You write the top, I’ll write the bottom

In the continuing saga of “You Write the Top, I’ll Write the Bottom,” we see that the Internet giant still hasn’t decided how to spell Internet:

fp internet uc lc

You’d think that a company that kinda depends on the Internet for its very existence would have standardized the spelling by now and wouldn’t put such an embarrassment on its front page.

It’s a zoo out there

This article on Yahoo! Travel may be about the best zoos in the United States, but it represents some of the worst travel writing on the Internet. It’s shocking the number of mistakes made by someone who is a “managing editor” and an experienced travel writer.

This is how bad it can get:

zoo 1

It’s not an orange-colored, artificially flavored breakfast drink. It’s an orangutan. And the zoo calls it the Stingray Beach, with a capital B.

How did she screw this up so badly? The zoo is the Saint Louis Zoo and it’s in St. Louis, Missouri. Don’t go on a Saturday or Sunday expecting to see a concert. Although the writer claims concerts occur every weekend, they really occur only on Fridays and only between May 23 and August 29. Then there’s the case of the subject (admission) and its verb (which the writer thinks should be are):

zoo 2

The problem is, if she used the correct verb (is), then she’s got a really awkward sentence. That’s because she misplaced both. It belongs before “the zoo and the concert”: … admission to both the zoo and the concert is free.

I was expecting that if I went to this zoo, I’d be able to do more than just see the wolf cubs. Maybe I could bottle-feed them. Or dress them in coats and ties.

zoo 3

Again, the writer misplaced a modifier; this time it’s just. It should be: You won’t see just three cuddly wolf cubs; you’ll also see, etc., etc. etc.

How does a travel writer writing about zoos get another zoo’s name wrong? It’s Riverbanks Zoo and Garden (it’s not Zoos and it’s not Botanical):

zoo 4

OK, so maybe someone will explain to me how this project will create a new grizzly bear:

zoo 5

Would you trust the information in this article?

Can we disc-uss this?

Let’s talk about this treatment of the trademark Frisbee on Yahoo! Sports:

frisbee sports

It’s a trademark! It gets a capital letter!

You write the top, I’ll write the bottom

In this episode of the continuing saga of “You Write the Top, I’ll Write the Bottom,” there’s a lack of agreement on the treatment of a popular brunchtime beverage:

fp bloody mary

If your authority on capitalization and spelling is the American Heritage Dictionary, then the preferred spelling is bloody mary, although Bloody Mary is also acceptable. Just not simultaneously.

Dmitri Young still the third heaviest

There’s just a minor problem on the Yahoo! front page:

fp mlb

The obvious gaffe involves some missing capital letters: Major League Baseball is a trademark of Major League Baseball, Properties, Inc. Less obvious? Dmitri Young wasn’t just the third heaviest player in the years he played; he was the third heaviest player in MLB history.

Not ready for the big leagues

I don’t think that the writer for Yahoo! News’ “Odd News” is quite ready for the big leagues of journalism, especially not in sports journalism. Anyone familiar with professional baseball knows about Major League Baseball. It’s a trademark owned by Major League Baseball Properties, Inc.

mlb news

Do you work for the same company?

Something’s amiss with KISS.  And it’s featured on yahoo.com:

fp kiss lc

Somebody decided to spell KISS with some lowercase letters. So, OK. Sometimes it shows up that way. But then someone else, who presumably works for the same company, decided to stylize it with all capital letters:

fp kiss cap

Do the people at Yahoo! talk to each other? Email each other? Text each other? Send smoke signals? What is so hard about deciding how to spell KISS?

Why, fie on that spelling!

According to the Wi-Fi Alliance, Wi-Fi is one of its registered trademarks. It’s not a common noun as alleged on the Yahoo! front page:

fp wifi

It’s more than a direction

If you’re referring to the Western Hemisphere as the West, give it a capital W; otherwise, it’s just a direction. And as you can see on yahoo.com, it doesn’t always make sense:

fp west lc

In this context, the reader isn’t sure if the virus went westward or if it made its way to the Western Hemisphere.

headline meaningless words

Here’s a headline from Yahoo! News that’s from the Refrigerator Magnetic School of Writing:

kfc lc news

It looks as if someone threw a handful of random words on magnets onto the front of the Frigidaire. Perhaps a Yahoo! staffer could have taken a few minutes and written an actual headline, with an actual meaning, before publishing this mess.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 710 other followers

%d bloggers like this: