You must be yoking!

I’ve only seen this mistake once before, and of course it was on Yahoo!. This time it appears on Yahoo! DIY:

yolk diy

For the Yahoo! writers and editors, I’ll explain. This is a yolk:

yolk sweater

This is the yoke of a sweater:

yoke sweater

You risk looking like you’re careless

If you confuse your and you’re in front of millions of readers, you look like you’re careless. Or worse, you look like you’re a writer for Yahoo! Style:

your wearing style

If you can’t be right, at least be consistent

That seems to be the motto of the writer for Yahoo! DIY who clings to the mistaken notion that a hangar is something you hang in your closet:

hangars diy

It is not. A hangar is something a plane hangs out in. But at least this gal is consistent:

hangars diy 2

… and maybe a bit stubborn. Here it is one more time:

hangars diy 3

The writer probably doesn’t think that spelling matters nowadays. Judging from the comments left for the article, I’d say she was wrong:

“For those who write these articles, PLEASE, check your spelling and verbiage.”

“Hanger – for clothes. Hangar – for airplanes”

“All the misused ‘hangars’ is very distracting. We’re not talking about organizing an airport hangar, we’re trying to get ideas on how to better organize our own closets. The word is h-a-n-g-e-r. with an ‘e’. Just for future reference, so those weird people like me who can’t get past incorrect spelling can focus on the content of the article instead of itching to make it right.”

Looking forward to a change

I’m looking forward to the day that the writers at Yahoo! Style know that the introductory text in a book is a foreword:

forward style

Getting your nails done, one at a time

Men who want to get their nails done individually, and not in a lump, should head on over to the salons mentioned on Yahoo! Style:

discretely style

These salons do nails discretely, as separate and distinct parts. I’ll bet they also perform their services discreetly, so as not to attract unwanted attention.

It’s one of those errors

It’s one of the most common errors careless writers make. And it’s on Yahoo! Style — it a headline:

its apos style

Does anyone need an explanation of why this is wrong? I didn’t think so.

It’s not a bum rap

Yahoo! Style writers will soon have a reputation for being the worst professional writers on the Net. And it’s not a bum rap. It’s well deserved:

bum wrap diy

This is a bum wrap:

bum wrap 2

An undeserved negative reputation is a bum rap. That’s something entirely different.

Also entirely different are hit the town (which means to party, usually implying some bar-hopping) and hit town (which means to arrive).

What does a tick say?

Just skip over the capitalized syndrome, and head right to the verbal ticks in this excerpt from Yahoo! Travel:

verbal ticks

A verbal tick is one of these guys who actually speaks:

tic pic

The uncontrollable outbursts of words from those with Tourette’s are verbal tics.

It just goes from bad to more bad

This headline was my first indication that the article on Yahoo! Style was not going to go well:

ed pick 1

The new ’60s-inspired pieces you need now? I think they involve a correctly placed an apostrophe (which shouldn’t be used to form the plural) and a hyphen.

Things only got worse. It’s hard to imagine what went through the writer’s mind when she pounded out this:

ed pick 2

It’s pretty clear that makes and reminds should be make and remind (because their subject is surfboards) and that summer isn’t a proper noun. But what could be wrong with wool sweater? The answer lies in the handy caption for the sweater that the writer provided:

ed pick 3

WTF? How did the writer screw up that badly? It’s a freakin’ linen sweater, not a wool one!

This writer is just obsessed with wool sweaters, to the point of lying about the actual material of her recommendations:

ed pick 4

First, let’s look at the helpful information the writer supplied because the alleged black stripe is actually navy:

ed pick 5

And is it mohair? Of course not! It’s nylon and acrylic. The writer just likes to make up her own little facts.

Do you know how difficult it is to find the correct spelling of gray? Luckily you don’t have to. In the U.S., it gets an A; in other English-speaking countries, the preferred spelling is grey:

ed pick 55

Again the writer proves that she’s grammatically challenged, unable to identify a plural subject (shape and color) and match it to a verb (which should be are).

When not making up information about sweaters, the writer likes to be creative about pants:

ed pick 6

What could possible wrong with that? The pattern is called dogtooth and the pants aren’t cropped, even though the writer just can’t let go of the whole crop pants thing:

ed pick 7

Geez. This just keeps getting worse. There’s a missing hyphen in must-have, fall is capitalized erroneously, and this sentence makes no sense:

ed pick 8

I don’t know what this means nor what FW means:

ed pick 9

Think it can’t get worse? Think again:

ed pick 85

The handbag is not made from box leather; it’s a leather box bag.And it was seen from a lot of famous people.

I have to keep reminding myself that this article was written by a professional writer, someone who is actually paid real money to write this crap:

ed pick 10

That’s someone who doesn’t know the difference between its and it’s. Who doesn’t know to end a sentence with a period (a comma just won’t do) and stick a hyphen in cat-eye.

It started off with a mistake and just kept piling ‘em on. It went from bad to more bad and more bad.

Would that be an Alp?

I don’t know what kind of peak Ms. Bundchen gave her followers. Maybe if you take a sneak peek at this article on Yahoo! Style, you can tell me if it’s in the Alps or the Pyrenees.

peak luhrman style

Oh, I almost forgot: Can you also tell me why the writer misspelled Baz Luhrmann’s name?

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