Dueling bombings

Unless the two bombings at the Boston Marathon were fighting each other, the writer for Yahoo! News meant dual bombings:

duel news

And unless she refers to MIT as “mitt,” and not by its letters like the rest of the world does, then the article before it should be an, not a.

Pilfering rolls?

Inquiring minds ask the folks at Yahoo! Style: Hot dog or hamburger buns? Just what kind of buns were stolen?

buns of steal style

If you’re referring to Coco Chanel’s derrière, then they’re likely buns of steel.

Just hangin’ out

I was hangin’ out over at Yahoo! Style, reading about Parisian restaurants when I almost spit out my nonfat, sugar-free vanilla latte:

hangar steak tr

Did the writer think that the steak sits around in those Quonset hut-like shelters for planes? The hanger steak gets its name because it hangs from the diaphragm of the steer, not because it hangs out at an airport.

Here’s a roundup

Here’s a roundup of what you can find in a single sentence on Yahoo! Style: A misspelling of roundup, a noun (round up, two words, is a phrasal verb) and a mistake that shines brighter than diamonds:

round up then style

It’s its, but it should be it’s

In spite of the fact that it’s the number 1 error in Terribly Write’s “Commonly Confused Words,” I don’t believe that professional writers don’t know the difference between its and it’s. I think that the writers for yahoo.com are just really careless:

fjp its no apos

For readers who are just learning English, let’s review: its is the possessive for of it; it’s is a contraction for it is or it has. It’s not hard.

It’s the principle of the thing

Here’s the principal reason I dislike Yahoo! Style: The quality of writing on the site is abysmal.

principle dancers style

It’s a basic principle of mine: If you’re paid to write, you should have a basic knowledge of the language you’re writing in.

Dem’s da breaks

Someone needs to fix this breaks on Yahoo! Travel:

breaks travel

Dem breaks should be brakes, which is the stuff that’ll stop your car.

Nothing says ‘I don’t give a crap’ like umf

There’s lots of bad writing on the Internet, even by paid professionals. And when they don’t give a crap about their writing, you’ll likely see factual errors, misspellings, and incorrect word choices. That’s what I was thinking when I read this on Yahoo! Travel:

breakfast travel 1

This is allegedly about something called “Hearty Eggs,” but nothing could be further from the truth. It’s really about haggis. It’s clear the writer was a tad confused about her subject, just as she was confused about the difference between further and farther, the word that refers to real, physical distance.

But nothing says “I don’t give a sh*t” like umf, which I take to be a lazy writer’s attempt at oomph. Umf is not a word, but it is an abbreviation and according to the Urban Dictionary it means “ugly motherf***er,” which I don’t think the writer meant. Although if she reads this, she may be thinking that.

That is not right

Abbreviations are handy little devices for communicating quickly and for conserving precious space online. But some abbreviations are so often misused that they’re not worth the time and space savings. That’s the case with the abbreviations i.e. and e.g., as illustrated by Yahoo! Style:

ie style

Even if the writer had included the period after the E and a comma after the entire abbreviation, it would still be wrong. The abbreviation stands for the Latin id est, which means that is. The writer meant e.g., the abbreviation used before an example.

These abbreviations are not only used incorrectly by most writers, but they’re also misunderstood by 90% of all readers. So why risk using the wrong abbreviation and confounding your readers? There are simple words (e.g., that is or for example) that you can use with confidence.

Oooh, nice figure you got there, Kate

What kind of compliment would a “high waist and color blocking” pay to Kate Winslet’s figure? That’s the question we all want answered after reading this on Yahoo! Movies:

compliment celeb

When you say something nice, you compliment a person. When two things go well together, they complement each other.

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