Check out this

So, how did Yahoo! Answers get its name? Is it the result of consumer research? I really don’t know, but I do know that it’s not the best-written site on Yahoo!. Check out the mistakes in this one little paragraph, which include a contraction (it’s) instead of a possessive pronoun (its) and a noun (checkout) instead of a phrasal verb (check out):

bluetooth answers

Going through a phase

Not much fazes me when I’m reading Yahoo! Celebrity. I generally remain unfazed by the writers’ many mistakes, even this one:

unphased omg

Let’s hope the ceilings are high

Any capitol would need high ceilings to accommodate a little NBA action.

capitol sports

The nation’s capitol is the United States Capitol. It’s a building on Capitol Hill in Washington D.C., which is the nation’s capital.  The capital is far more likely to be the site of an NBA game, and not the building that’s alleged on Yahoo! Sports.

It’ll leave you in stitches

Sewing seeds involves needle and thread. Sowing seeds (even figuratively) involves scattering them around so that they’ll grow. Screwing up the words involves a writer on Yahoo! Sports:

sewn sports

That makes no sense

I sense a homophonic error on Yahoo! TV. Could it be that the writer really doesn’t know the difference between a sensor and a person who bleeps out sweary words?

sensors tv

Yup.  I swear that’s the most fucked-up (strike-through courtesy of TW censors) mistake I’ve seen today.

You can’t win

Here’s one expression on Yahoo! News that you’ll never get right:

just desserts

The correct expression is just deserts. The word deserts (which is pronounced like desserts) means “something deserved.” But I guarantee you, that if the writer had used just deserts, some reader would claim it is wrong.  Regardless of the spelling you use, someone will think it’s wrong.

The solution: Avoid using this expression. Do not use it.  Never, ever write just deserts or just desserts.

Like crackers and cheese?

Do you have two favorite snacks that go well together? You know, like they’re complementary? I’m thinking crackers and cheese. Ruffles and Lipton Onion Soup dip. Hummus and pita. Those are my favorite complementary snacks. I wonder if that’s what the Yahoo! Travel writer meant:

complementary travel

Do you think you have to pay for the snacks — or are they complimentary?

What’s an virtual shoe-in?

What’s an virtual shoe-in (besides an incorrect use of the indefinite article an)? A virtual foot, of course. That wasn’t what the writer for Yahoo! News meant, though:

an virtual shoe-in news

He meant “a virtual shoo-in.”

Laying it out in black and white

Let’s lay this out in black and white for the Yahoo! Celebrity writer: If you don’t know that fiancé is an engaged man (and fiancée is an engaged woman), perhaps you should refer to the man as betrothed. Or maybe boyfriend:

simpson omg 1

If you’re using it as an adjective, then black-and-white gets two hyphens. (As a noun, it doesn’t need those hyphens.)

So, Jessica Simpson posted a black-and-white photo on Instagram. Is it any surprise that it looked like she was wearing a black and white dress? (I really don’t know how the writer could tell what color the dress was.) Repeating a word isn’t the worst mistake a writer can make, but claiming she “was laid out” makes it sound like the poor woman was prepared for a funeral, not a wedding:

simpson omg 2

Finally, the writer alleges that her hand was “placed seductively over her eyebrow.” Unless her eyebrow is somewhere on the top of her head, I think the writer made a misstatement:

simpson omg 3

Would that be the Sahara?

Which desert would that be? The Sahara? Gobi? Mojave? No, that would be a misspelling of dessert on Yahoo! Travel:

desert travel

As I learned in third grade: You want more dessert, so give dessert more letters (actually, one letter more) than desert.

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