You really meant firery, didn’t you?

I was willing to call it a typo. Obviously the writer for Yahoo! DIY knew how to spell fiery. She was just a little clumsy when typing out the headline:

firery diy

Then I noticed that she didn’t know that the thing over a fireplace was a mantel. Then I noticed a repeated firery. This time it had to be intentional. She really thinks that’s a word! Just like she really thinks that an ellipsis is made up of six periods, and not the customary three.

Whether you’re a writing pro…

… or you’re an amateur blogger, you don’t want to look like this grammatically impaired writer for Yahoo! DIY:

your a diy pro

Supporting Taylor Swift’s midriff

Does it take the magic of smoke and mirrors during Taylor Swift’s performances to hold up her midriff? Just wondering what the writer for Yahoo! Style was watching when the rest of the world was watching Ms. Swift’s midriff-baring costumes:

midriff-bearing style

What are the odds?

What are the odds that a professional writer would use its and mean it’s and use it’s and mean its? If that writer works for Yahoo! DIY, pretty good:

its w wo apos diy

That’s altogether different

You can replace the words all together with altogether and then this would be altogether correct on Yahoo! DIY:

all ltogether diy

If you mean entirely, completely, or utterly, use altogether. It’s altogether different from all together, which refers to members of a group doing something collectively.

Why not thinking out of the box

It looks like the elementary school crowd has taken over the writing of this article on Yahoo! DIY. How else would you explain the verb gets with an apostrophe? Or the use of it’s instead of its? Did we all master that by the time we were 12? And I’m still trying to figure out how an editor would fix the last sentence here:

gets its apos diy

Is it “Warm gatherings … call for” or “A warm gathering… calls for”? Anyone?

Sometimes when you’re trying to write something creative, you have to think out of the box. But not this far out of the box:

gets its apos diy 2

There’s that apostrophe again, used to form a plural this time. And for the third time in a single article, it’s wrong. Never has a little punctuation mark done so much and been so wrong.

You must be yoking!

I’ve only seen this mistake once before, and of course it was on Yahoo!. This time it appears on Yahoo! DIY:

yolk diy

For the Yahoo! writers and editors, I’ll explain. This is a yolk:

yolk sweater

This is the yoke of a sweater:

yoke sweater

You risk looking like you’re careless

If you confuse your and you’re in front of millions of readers, you look like you’re careless. Or worse, you look like you’re a writer for Yahoo! Style:

your wearing style

If you can’t be right, at least be consistent

That seems to be the motto of the writer for Yahoo! DIY who clings to the mistaken notion that a hangar is something you hang in your closet:

hangars diy

It is not. A hangar is something a plane hangs out in. But at least this gal is consistent:

hangars diy 2

… and maybe a bit stubborn. Here it is one more time:

hangars diy 3

The writer probably doesn’t think that spelling matters nowadays. Judging from the comments left for the article, I’d say she was wrong:

“For those who write these articles, PLEASE, check your spelling and verbiage.”

“Hanger – for clothes. Hangar – for airplanes”

“All the misused ‘hangars’ is very distracting. We’re not talking about organizing an airport hangar, we’re trying to get ideas on how to better organize our own closets. The word is h-a-n-g-e-r. with an ‘e’. Just for future reference, so those weird people like me who can’t get past incorrect spelling can focus on the content of the article instead of itching to make it right.”

Looking forward to a change

I’m looking forward to the day that the writers at Yahoo! Style know that the introductory text in a book is a foreword:

forward style

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