Does that ring a bell?

When writers try to use common idioms and get them wrong, I scratch my head. “What do they think that means?” I wonder, dusting the dandruff off my keyboard.

Such is the case when I read this on Yahoo! Shine:

ringer shine

What did the writer think “put through the ringer” meant? This is a ringer:

ringer

This is a wringer — the part of a wringer washer that squeezes out water:

wringer

Putting English through the wringer

The English language gets put through the wringer every day on Yahoo!. This time it’s suffering at the keyboard of a reporter for Yahoo! News‘ “The Ticket”:

Less egregious offenses in that same article include capitalizing words that don’t deserve it:

typos that leave me confused:

and an apparent  reference to a life insurance company. Or is it a reference to prudent regulators? Or something else that might actually make sense?

It’s a dead ringer for a funny cliché

The English language is once again put through the wringer at the keyboard of a Yahoo! Shine writer:

Lobbing through the wringer

When he’s not lobbing insults at “American Idol” contestants, Simon Cowell spends his time trying to influence legislators. No, no, that can’t be right. It doesn’t make sense, but it does appear in the Yahoo! Music blog “Reality Rocks,” so there must be some truth to it:

constantine music blog 1

Was there a ringer in “American Idol”? Someone who was put there by the producers to affect the outcome of the voting?

constantine music blog 2

And was the ringer put through the wringer like the other contestants?

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 822 other followers

%d bloggers like this: