Did you out a word?

Do you proofread your pearls to make sure you haven’t left out a word? Why risk the embarrassment that a Yahoo! News writer is facing with the claim that “Suspect in missing Virginia student linked to…”:

embassy news

You might also do a little research to make sure you haven’t undercapitalized a word, such as embassy, which should have an initial cap when it’s preceded by the country’s name. According to Associated Press style, it’s the Ethiopian Embassy, the American Embassy, but an embassy.

Well, I never!

I wish I could say I’ve never seen anything like this, but I can’t. It’s just text that’s obviously longer than the space provided for it on yahoo.com:

fp you never

Makes you wonder if anyone at Yahoo! bothered to check this after it was published. Nah, it doesn’t really make me wonder, because I’m pretty sure nobody checks anything after it’s live. Like, I bet nobody at Yahoo! Health took the time to check out this headline about repercussioi of Mr. Depardieu’s something-or-other:

repercussio health

Lessons from Yahoo Health

You can learn a lot just by reading the headlines at the home page of Yahoo! Health. You won’t learn anything about health, but you will learn what not to do when you write.

 

Lesson 1: Make sure your text isn’t longer than the space reserved for it.

You might read this and wonder “Sneak a workout in at what?” The opera? The line outside the ladies room at Yankee Stadium? Your kid’s piano recital? The options are endless.

miss word health

 

Lesson 2: Not every sentence beginning with what is a question.

This headline isn’t a question and “Listen to Your Body” isn’t a question. The only question is why would anyone think that question mark is necessary. Oh, and another question: How did you get a job as a writer?

what quest health

 

Lesson 3: You can’t always trust your spell-checker.

Facing a jury verdict and want to rise above it? You can! And you can do it in time for Race Day, which is apparently when you start running before they take you in for sentencing:

jury health

Writing expert … recommend proofreading

Here’s an idea that’s sure to be of use of the folks at Yahoo! Health: Proofread your headlines before and after you’ve published them:

recommend genetic

Yup, that’s it. Does that headline make sense to you?

Take a critical look these errors

Behold the errors from Yahoo! Movies:

ic truck movies

There’s no shortage of creativity when it comes to hyphen usage. These folks can’t decide if it’s “ice cream truck” or “ice-cream truck” or the truly original “ice cream-truck.”

Not confined by the rules of grammar, the writer seems to think it’s okie-dokie to use the plural pronouns them and they to refer to the singular truck. It’s not.

And if you take a critical look at this paragraph you might spot another goof: A missing word.

Suffice it to say, this is not good

It looks like there’ll be lots of material for Terribly Write in the new Yahoo! Style. Here’s a random snippet that offers lessons in writing for all of us:

paring style

Lesson 1: If you’re writing about fashion, learn to spell the names of designers and fashion labels, like Emporio Armani. Misspelling something so basic marks you as careless — or worse.

Lesson 2: Suffice it to say, make sure you get common idioms right.

Lesson 3: Pairing misspellings with homophonic errors makes you look uneducated. Know the difference between pare (which means to trim) and pair (which doesn’t).

Lesson 4: If you mean socks with white laces, then write “white-laced socks.” If you mean socks with white lace, don’t.

What a nut!

You know what’s weirder than Blueberry Hazelnut Pringles? Blueberry Hazelnet Pringles!

hazelnet travel

Thanks for that, Yahoo! Travel.

This should be investigated

Do you think the writer is being investigated for dropping a word on the home page of Yahoo! Sports?

investigated sports

Nah.

Grammatically challenged

Long-time readers of Terribly Write know all too well that many Yahoo! writers are grammatically challenged. Here’s more proof from Yahoo! TV:

pap was tv

 

Oy! When it comes to words based on Italian, they’re even more challenged. The word paparazzi is plural; its singular is paparazzo. A paparazzo is “a freelance photographer who doggedly pursues celebrities to take candid pictures for sale to magazines and newspapers” (American Heritage Dictionary). The word is taken from the name Paparazzo, a character who was a photographer in Federico Fellini’s 1960 film La Dolce Vita.

As for the end of that paragraph: I have no idea what that is supposed to mean. None.

How one little word can make you look dumb

OK, how would you know if Daniel Radcliffe was the only star “to go incognito”? If someone is incognito, how can you tell they are a celebrity or not? It makes no sense. But here it is on the Yahoo! front page:

fp incognito

That allegation makes no sense because the writer left out one teensy word: not. Mr. Radcliffe was not the only star in a costume. How do I know? Because I can read. And the headline for the accompanying article is:

dan rad movies

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