Grammatically challenged

Long-time readers of Terribly Write know all too well that many Yahoo! writers are grammatically challenged. Here’s more proof from Yahoo! TV:

pap was tv

 

Oy! When it comes to words based on Italian, they’re even more challenged. The word paparazzi is plural; its singular is paparazzo. A paparazzo is “a freelance photographer who doggedly pursues celebrities to take candid pictures for sale to magazines and newspapers” (American Heritage Dictionary). The word is taken from the name Paparazzo, a character who was a photographer in Federico Fellini’s 1960 film La Dolce Vita.

As for the end of that paragraph: I have no idea what that is supposed to mean. None.

How one little word can make you look dumb

OK, how would you know if Daniel Radcliffe was the only star “to go incognito”? If someone is incognito, how can you tell they are a celebrity or not? It makes no sense. But here it is on the Yahoo! front page:

fp incognito

That allegation makes no sense because the writer left out one teensy word: not. Mr. Radcliffe was not the only star in a costume. How do I know? Because I can read. And the headline for the accompanying article is:

dan rad movies

A couple of letters are missing

A couple of letters are missing from the Yahoo! front page —  O and F:

fp couple years

Yes, the idiom is couple of, not couple, at least according to the American Heritage Dictionary:

The of in the phrase a couple of is often dropped in speech, but this omission is usually considered a mistake. In 2013, 80 percent of the Usage Panel found the sentence A couple friends came over to watch the game to be unacceptable.

Having troible proofreading?

Geez. We know that the writers and editors at Yahoo! have trouble proofreading, by which I mean they do not proofread. So, you’d think that the Internet giant would at least provide them with a spell-checker. At least one error on Yahoo! Music could be eliminated:

troibled music

A spell-checker would have spit out troibled, but wouldn’t have identified the missing words. That’s for the reader to provide.

John Kerry carries heavy load

When they’re not erroneously claiming that Secretary of State John Kerry was once the governor of Massachusetts (or Massachussetts as they would have it), the folks at Yahoo! News place the entire country of Afghanistan on his shoulders:

latest afghan news

That’s quite a heavy load for a 70-year-old.

headline meaningless words

Here’s a headline from Yahoo! News that’s from the Refrigerator Magnetic School of Writing:

kfc lc news

It looks as if someone threw a handful of random words on magnets onto the front of the Frigidaire. Perhaps a Yahoo! staffer could have taken a few minutes and written an actual headline, with an actual meaning, before publishing this mess.

Not a high school graduate

How the heck did Eminem’s daughter do that? In October she was a high school homecoming queen, and now she’s a college graduate?

fp grad college

The answer is pretty simple: This appeared on yahoo.com, a site not known for accurately reproducing facts. It was right under the writer’s nose. Assuming the writer doesn’t have a schnoz like Cyrano de Bergerac, it should have been easy to see that the girl didn’t graduate from college. (And I meant graduate from college, not graduate college.)

You’re not the only who hates typos

Hate typos? Hate missing words in headlines? Me, too. That’s why I’m not fond of this headline on Yahoo! TV:

missing one tv

This seems totally off

Here’s something on yahoo.com that had me scratching my head and dusting the dandruff off my keyboard:

fp weight loss

I just don’t see how losing some pounds can pay for a baseball player. It might pay off for a minor league player. And how does someone make the Major League after 12 years of baseball? Did he start playing when he was 20?  Oh, right. That’s wrong. He spent 12 years in minor league baseball. That’s something completely different.

This is a sorry excuse for writing

I’m sorry to say it, but it’s hard to believe that this article from Yahoo! Shine was produced by a professional writer. Heck, it’s hard to believe it was written by a middle school graduate.

There are a few minor problems, like needlessly capitalizing a word. “Sorry” doesn’t get a capital letter unless it’s at the start of a sentence or you’re writing about the board game:

sorry 1

This is a sorry attempt at making a possessive out of women:

sorry 2

(To form the possessive of a plural noun not ending in S, just add an apostrophe and S: women’s, men’s, children’s.)

Things get a little sorrier with an error-filled paragraph, which includes a subject-verb mismatch (the subject study takes the verb has identified):

sorry 3

A “verbal tick” sounds like a talking, bloodsucking arachnid. If the writer meant an idiosyncratic and habitual behavior, that would be a tic. Then there’s the issue of the pronoun they, which has no antecedent. Just who is they? The rest of the sentence is just a mess. If you’re still reading that article at this point, I feel sorry for you.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 699 other followers

%d bloggers like this: