Can’t make up your mind?

Can’t make up your mind about the spelling of a word and refuse to check a dictionary? It seems that the answer is “yes” for the writers on yahoo.com when it comes to cease-fire. Somebody thinks it needs a hyphen:

fp cease-fire

and somebody thinks it doesn’t:

fp ceasefire

I guess that solves that dilemma. Spell the word both ways! Or, take a look at the American Heritage Dictionary (which is part of the Yahoo! network) to see that the preferred spelling is with a hyphen, although the single, unhyphenated word is also acceptable.

Holy typos, Batman!

Here’s a look at what you can find in a single day on the home page of Yahoo! TV.

A misspelling of Kit Harington:

harrington tv hp

Incorrect quotation marks around a character’s name:

batman quot tv hp

(If the writer were referring to the movie or TV show, the quotation marks would be okie-dokie, but the reference is to the character.)

I’d like to give a shout-out to the writer of this headline, but I can’t. It’s missing the hyphen that makes shout-out a noun:

shout out tv hp

How on God’s green earth do you explain this one? Did the writer first pound out it’s, decide that it’s wrong, and change it to it is?

it is tv hp

I bet the writer of this headline would like to turn back time and correct this blunder:

turining tv

Finally, another typo (how could anyone miss that?) and a second misspelling of Mr. Harington’s name:

harrington tv hp 2

It’s Opposites Weekend at Yahoo!

What the heck is going on at yahoo.com? Are we the victims of some prank, a case of Opposites Weekend? Yesterday I noticed that yahoo.com lied about Daniel Radcliffe being the only star in a disguise at Comic-Con. Now there’s this headline:

fp godzilla quot

First let’s dispense with the issue of the quotation marks. Unless Godzilla refers to the movie (and it doesn’t), there shouldn’t be quotes around it. The names of characters don’t get that sort of treatment. (Hmmm. Unless that’s not really his name…) Then the writer alleges that Godzilla will be fighting new foes. Baloney!

Here’s the headline from the article, replete with the incorrect quotation marks. Notice the words Old Foes?

fp godzilla quot 2

Is Yahoo! just messin’ with us? Or are the writers there really that incompetent?

Jay Z gets a little more and Justin Bieber gets off a bus

Yahoo! Music is just full of breaking news. It starts with rapper Jay Z, who removed the hyphen from his name a year ago. But if we are to believe the music experts at Yahoo!, he’s put it back in:

jay-z music hp

And in other music news, Justin Bieber gets off a bus:

debus music hp

Check out this

So, how did Yahoo! Answers get its name? Is it the result of consumer research? I really don’t know, but I do know that it’s not the best-written site on Yahoo!. Check out the mistakes in this one little paragraph, which include a contraction (it’s) instead of a possessive pronoun (its) and a noun (checkout) instead of a phrasal verb (check out):

bluetooth answers

Sill, you can’t help noticing

Sometimes, when I read something on Yahoo! Celebrity, I can’t help wondering if the writer is familiar with basic English idioms, like this:

rent 1

Actually, the Kardashians have been renting a home; the owner of the home has been renting out the home.

There are some mistakes I can overlook. Still, I can’t help noticing the typos:

rent 2

and the missing apostrophe in what should be Kardashians’:

rent 3

and at least one word too many here:

rent 4

Can you overlook errors like these?

Not ready for the big leagues

I don’t think that the writer for Yahoo! News’ “Odd News” is quite ready for the big leagues of journalism, especially not in sports journalism. Anyone familiar with professional baseball knows about Major League Baseball. It’s a trademark owned by Major League Baseball Properties, Inc.

mlb news

Why, fie on that spelling!

According to the Wi-Fi Alliance, Wi-Fi is one of its registered trademarks. It’s not a common noun as alleged on the Yahoo! front page:

fp wifi

You write the top, I’ll write the bottom

In yet another edition of “You Write the Top, I’ll Write the Bottom,” where I point out the inconsistencies on yahoo.com, we see that there’s some confusion over hyphen use:

fp debt relief hyph no hyph

New isn’t always better

The Yahoo! Health site has been completely redesigned. But it brings with it more articles written by Yahoo! staffers and hence, more and more errors.

Here’s an example; it’s not the worst writing you’ll see on Yahoo!. It’s just bad enough to make me skeptical of the accuracy of the content.

Are there less opportunities to exercise outside? No, there are fewer opportunities to exercise outside, so people are getting less exercise and doing fewer exercises:

overeat health 1

Actually, wrecking havoc would be a good thing. Better to wreck havoc than to wreak havoc (which means “to bring about” havoc):

overeat health 2

I can’t begin to fathom why the writer thought this apostrophe was necessary:

overeat health 3

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