It’s just an estimate

I guess this event will be starting at an estimated time of 2 PM. Or maybe an established time of 2 PM:

est style 2

In my estimation, the writers for Yahoo! Style have no idea what the abbreviation for Eastern Standard Time is. Here’s a hint, it doesn’t include a period.

It takes one millisecond’s time

It takes just one millisecond’s time to spot the missing apostrophe on Yahoo! News:

six years time new

An apostrophe is required in what the Associated Press Stylebook calls a quasi possessive: 6 years’ time, one week’s pay, ten years’ experience.

Where do nymphs frolic?`

So, this writer for Yahoo! Style had a little problem with punctuation. I wouldn’t ordinarily mention it because it seems too nitpicky, even for me. But I can’t ignore it.  Just like I can’t ignore the claim that a designer has revisited a theme for a second time. I guess that means he’s visiting it three times: The first visit, the revisit, and the revisit for the second time. I wonder if at each visit to the theme nymphs frolicked in woodlawn:

woodlawn style

And was this where the woodlawn nymphs frolicked?

woodlawn

Or is it just possible that maybe perhaps it was woodland nymphs who did the frolicking?

I just have to say it

I just have to say it: This is horrible. Atrocious. An embarrassment to the writer, Yahoo! Style, and all of Yahoo!:

maggie

It’s amazing the number and severity of errors one writer can make in a single sentence. First let me warn anyone who might be tempted to click on the first link. Don’t bother. It doesn’t have an actual URL behind it; you’ll just get an error.

Then let’s just say that apostrophes (especially when they face the wrong direction) are no substitute for actual quotation marks, which is what I think Yahoo! uses to delineate titles of TV shows.

How lazy a writer do you have to be to neglect to look up the name of the dancer in a YouTube video? Her name is Maddie Ziegler.

If by “empty rooms” the writer means rooms containing furniture, pictures on the wall, and curtains at the windows, then yes, the rooms are empty.

If these jaw-dropping errors are what we can expect to see in the future on the new Yahoo! Style, then I’ll be hanging out somewhere else — at a site that employs real writers with some measure of integrity and pride in their work.

You write the top, I’ll write the bottom

In this episode of “You Write the Top, I’ll Write the Bottom” from the Yahoo! front page, it’s apparent that the existence of the United Nations came as a complete surprise. Apparently the writers didn’t have time to decide how to abbreviate the international organization:

fp un

Lessons from Yahoo Health

You can learn a lot just by reading the headlines at the home page of Yahoo! Health. You won’t learn anything about health, but you will learn what not to do when you write.

 

Lesson 1: Make sure your text isn’t longer than the space reserved for it.

You might read this and wonder “Sneak a workout in at what?” The opera? The line outside the ladies room at Yankee Stadium? Your kid’s piano recital? The options are endless.

miss word health

 

Lesson 2: Not every sentence beginning with what is a question.

This headline isn’t a question and “Listen to Your Body” isn’t a question. The only question is why would anyone think that question mark is necessary. Oh, and another question: How did you get a job as a writer?

what quest health

 

Lesson 3: You can’t always trust your spell-checker.

Facing a jury verdict and want to rise above it? You can! And you can do it in time for Race Day, which is apparently when you start running before they take you in for sentencing:

jury health

Unfortunately, it’s not rarely seen

On the Yahoo! front page, the hyphen is overused, as it is in this recently published teaser:

fp recently-deceased 2

Perhaps if the writers were closely watched they wouldn’t throw a hyphen in after an adverb ending in -LY:

fp closely-watched 2

This mistake isn’t rarely seen; it occurs quite often on yahoo.com:

fp rarely-seen 2

Here’s what these writers don’t understand: An adverb ending in -LY is a signal to the reader that it modifies the word that follows it. There’s no need to join those two words with a hyphen.

Not a geography expert?

Not the winner of the National Geographic Bee, but still think you got what it takes to write about places around the world? No worries! You can write for the Yahoo! front page, where knowledge of geography (or just about any subject) is not required:

fp cabo

Even if you think that there’s a town named Cabo in a Mexican state called San Lucas, you could work at yahoo.com. Imagine how far you’d get if you actually know that the city is Cabo San Lucas.

It’s not just a replica

Jerry “The King” Lawler doesn’t own just a replica of a famous car, he owns a replica version of it. Which is something different, I guess — at least in the minds of yahoo.com staffers:

fp version 60s

Also different in their minds is the plural 1960s, which really doesn’t need that apostrophe.

You write the top, I’ll write the bottom

In this episode of “You Write the Top, I’ll Write the Bottom” from the Yahoo! front page, it’s apparent that the writer of the top module didn’t really think the U.S. is officially at war, but the writer of the bottom module thought it was:

fp at war

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