Writer of anarchy

If you’ve never seen than mistaken for then, or haven’t seen the compound adjective 30-second without its hyphen, then you haven’t been reading Yahoo! DIY.

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What would Yahoo! DIY be without its very own misuse of it’s for its?

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Somehow in that same article, this got past the eagle-eyed editors:

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I think it has something to do with wearing a pattern to keep your head warm. Frankly, I think a hat would be warmer than a pattern.

Of course there are more typos, like this one below:

soa 4

Call me old-fashioned, but I appreciate the well-placed hyphen and the beauty of a real dash (like this: —) and not a puny hyphen:

soa 5

Also, I think pronouns (like them) should refer to a noun that’s actually present in the same sentence. Or paragraph. Or article.

What a crock!

This article on Yahoo! DIY has a promising start: The writer, whose title is actually editor, gave the trademarked Crock-Pot its due with capital letters and a hyphen. Then the wheels fell off:

crock pots diy

She has a little trouble with the extraneous them, which was just dropped in for no reason. And more trouble with the pronoun they, which requires a plural antecedent (the object it refers to); there’s just none other than recipes and that makes no sense. Of course, we know she should have used the singular it, referring to Crock-Pot, which is how she should have spelled the trademarked name of the slow cooker.

You write the top, I’ll write the bottom

In this episode of “You Write the Top, I’ll Write the Bottom,” the editors at yahoo.com can’t agree on the spelling of a word with or without a hyphen:

fp lookalikes

The American Heritage Dictionary prefers look-alike, but the unhyphenated word is also acceptable. What’s not acceptable is using both.

Try to keep your story straight

It must be hard for some people to keep information in their heads. Some people can write a paragraph and just can’t remember what they wrote minutes later. Take this excerpt from Yahoo! Style:

ball 1

We can’t expect a writer to remember that there’s no hyphen in nonprofit. Nor that there’s no “the Barbados.” Nor that amongst is considered a pretentious variation of among to American ears. But she might remember that she wrote about a foundation created in honor of Rihanna’s grandmother.

Dang! If you hadn’t told us this, I would have believed that the foundation was in honor of her grandmother:

ball 2

See? She forgot what she wrote in the preceding paragraph. That’s maybe too much info for anyone to recall.

Perhaps next time she pounds out an article for which she is paid real money to write, she’ll remember that a peak is a top and a peek is a quick look:

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You write the top, I’ll write the bottom. Halloween edition

One of these spellings on the Yahoo! front page is probably right. Which one? I don’t know. But I do know that if you can’t be right, at least be consistent: Pick one spelling and go with it. Oh, and let the other person also writing on yahoo.com know what you’ve decided.

fp hall-oween

Do you need a second costume?

So, you already have your Halloween costume. You’re going to your BFF’s party as a slutty slut. But the boss just announced that everyone must come to work in costume on October 31. Your slutty slut is kinda NSFW. You need a second costume! Don’t panic. The creative minds at Yahoo! DIY have ten second costumes; one is sure to be just right:

10 second costumes diy

But wait! There’s more! Each of these costumes can be made in less than a minute. In fact, you might call them “10-Second Costumes.”

What a difference a hyphen makes.

A no-nonsense look at writing

After reading the scribblings of Yahoo! writers and editors for years, few mistakes surprise me. But here are two that I’ve never seen before and hope to never see again:

themself diy

From Yahoo! DIY we get the nonsense that should be no-nonsense and the inscrutable themself. Really? The writer couldn’t figure out the plural themselves? In all the horrible, terrible, no good writing I’ve come across, I’ve never, ever seen a themself. Never.

I should have stopped reading

I shouldn’t have read more than this headline on Yahoo! Style:

our stories 1

I should have known that if the headline contains one humongous goof, the article itself is going to be a disaster. The huge mistake in the headline? The article is about a retailer called & Other Stories. How bad is that? Bad. But it gets worse.

At least in the opening paragraph, the writer manages to use the correct words for the retailer, though she does close up the space after the ampersand:

our stories 2

But she drops the the in what should be “in the U.S.” and the hyphen that’s required in brand-new. Maybe the writer is a recent arrival to the States and doesn’t realize that it’s capitalized when referring to the United States.

When it’s a noun or an adjective, must-have must have a hyphen:

our stories 3

This could be a simple typo (names instead of named), but the use of the pronoun their without any known antecedent is just wrong:

our stories 4

How do you explain the misspelling of a product when it appears below a picture of the product?

our stories 5

The final sentence of the article doesn’t disappoint: One hardly ever sees the use of a plural verb with the singular everything:

our stories 6

That was not good. I knew when I read the headline I should have stopped reading. My bad.

Not even trying

Ah, geez. This writer came up with one stinking little paragraph and she can’t even get the name of the product right? She’s not even trying:

fendi peekaboo

The bag is called the Peekaboo — without any of those hyphens. It’s downright (notice it’s one word?) crazy that the writer would insert them. I can forgive her for referring to an object as she, although it strikes me as both amateurish and juvenile. But then she tries to construct a sentence that is pure nonsense and seems to think navy is a synonym for midnight blue. It isn’t and the claim that “her navy is also .. midnight blue” just makes no sense.

The worst case of the hick-ups

It seems that the writers for Yahoo! Style have no regard for spelling. Case in point: these ridiculous errors that include a misspelling of hiccups and arbitrary (and totally incorrect) hyphens.

hick-ups style

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