Move your S

So, there are a coupla things on the Yahoo! front page that can be corrected simply by moving a letter:

fp tolls soars

I’m pretty sure that it’s a toll that soars and that thousands (and not a single thousand) flee. Just by moving the S from tolls to the end of thousand, the writer can correct two mistakes!

This headline make me want to cry

This headline, with its subject-verb disconnect, makes me want to cry:

blog make us travel

Does anyone at Yahoo! Travel proofread?

You think they’re fed up?

Two stars with the Colorado Rockies are fed up with losing. I wonder if the writers for the Yahoo! front page are fed up with being featured on Terribly Write. Here we go again, with a misspelled Gonzalez and a mismatch of the singular neither with the plural verb want:

fp gonazlez

Say goodbye to English

Say goodbye to English. When a writer can’t match a subject and verb, it feels like the language is dying. The writer for Yahoo! TV apparently thinks “Rizzoli & Isles” is two people. It’s actually the name of one TV program, so it’s singular and its verb should be singular, too:

say goodbye tv

This is a sorry excuse for writing

I’m sorry to say it, but it’s hard to believe that this article from Yahoo! Shine was produced by a professional writer. Heck, it’s hard to believe it was written by a middle school graduate.

There are a few minor problems, like needlessly capitalizing a word. “Sorry” doesn’t get a capital letter unless it’s at the start of a sentence or you’re writing about the board game:

sorry 1

This is a sorry attempt at making a possessive out of women:

sorry 2

(To form the possessive of a plural noun not ending in S, just add an apostrophe and S: women’s, men’s, children’s.)

Things get a little sorrier with an error-filled paragraph, which includes a subject-verb mismatch (the subject study takes the verb has identified):

sorry 3

A “verbal tick” sounds like a talking, bloodsucking arachnid. If the writer meant an idiosyncratic and habitual behavior, that would be a tic. Then there’s the issue of the pronoun they, which has no antecedent. Just who is they? The rest of the sentence is just a mess. If you’re still reading that article at this point, I feel sorry for you.

We’re in complete disagreement

It’s not uncommon to see a disagreement between a subject and its verb on Yahoo! When that grammatical gaffe occurs on the home of Yahoo! News, I have to wonder about the accuracy of the article. I’m not sure I’d trust a site that gets the verb wrong here:

marks news

and here:

heighten news

That’s news to me

It’s news to me: I had always thought that news was a plural noun that was used with a singular verb. But the grammatical Einsteins at yahoo.com have come up with a different take on the word:

fp news come

Either have or has is correct

Neither the writer nor the editor has addressed this incorrect verb on Yahoo! Music:

neither have music

When a subject consists of two nouns joined by the correlative conjunction neither…nor, the verb must agree with the noun closer to it.

Blogger regularly battles grammar gaffes

Is there a worse place to make a grammar gaffe than on the home page of Yahoo! Celebrity?

battles omg

Houston, we have a problem

Houston, we have a problem on the home page of Yahoo! Sports:

houson sports

But that’s not all. Perhaps it was the same person who couldn’t spell Houston who also couldn’t match a verb to its subject:

has sports

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