Either one

This is not the first time either a writer or an editor for Yahoo! Celebrity has made a grammatical error:

have omg

When the subject is two nouns joined by either…or, the verb must agree with the noun closer to it.

Grammatically challenged

Long-time readers of Terribly Write know all too well that many Yahoo! writers are grammatically challenged. Here’s more proof from Yahoo! TV:

pap was tv

 

Oy! When it comes to words based on Italian, they’re even more challenged. The word paparazzi is plural; its singular is paparazzo. A paparazzo is “a freelance photographer who doggedly pursues celebrities to take candid pictures for sale to magazines and newspapers” (American Heritage Dictionary). The word is taken from the name Paparazzo, a character who was a photographer in Federico Fellini’s 1960 film La Dolce Vita.

As for the end of that paragraph: I have no idea what that is supposed to mean. None.

Just kidding

Everything from the headlines to the teasers to the links has been proofread on yahoo.com:

fp have

Just kidding. Clearly that sentence, with its mismatched subject and verb, escaped the eyes of the proofreaders and editors.

Check out this

So, how did Yahoo! Answers get its name? Is it the result of consumer research? I really don’t know, but I do know that it’s not the best-written site on Yahoo!. Check out the mistakes in this one little paragraph, which include a contraction (it’s) instead of a possessive pronoun (its) and a noun (checkout) instead of a phrasal verb (check out):

bluetooth answers

Move your S

So, there are a coupla things on the Yahoo! front page that can be corrected simply by moving a letter:

fp tolls soars

I’m pretty sure that it’s a toll that soars and that thousands (and not a single thousand) flee. Just by moving the S from tolls to the end of thousand, the writer can correct two mistakes!

This headline make me want to cry

This headline, with its subject-verb disconnect, makes me want to cry:

blog make us travel

Does anyone at Yahoo! Travel proofread?

You think they’re fed up?

Two stars with the Colorado Rockies are fed up with losing. I wonder if the writers for the Yahoo! front page are fed up with being featured on Terribly Write. Here we go again, with a misspelled Gonzalez and a mismatch of the singular neither with the plural verb want:

fp gonazlez

Say goodbye to English

Say goodbye to English. When a writer can’t match a subject and verb, it feels like the language is dying. The writer for Yahoo! TV apparently thinks “Rizzoli & Isles” is two people. It’s actually the name of one TV program, so it’s singular and its verb should be singular, too:

say goodbye tv

This is how mistakes spread

When the verb phrase opt out appeared on Yahoo! Sports with a hyphen — not once, but twice — I feared we’d see this mistake elsewhere:

opt-out sports

It looks like Yahoo! News picked up the story and went with the misspelling of the verb, too:

opt-out news

Hey, they may be wrong, but at least they’re consistent. For a change.

They may have gotten this wrong

The writers for yahoo.com may have gotten this verb wrong:

fp may have got

If they’re writing for a U.S.  audience, the preferred past participle of get is gotten.

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