Not the best in journalism

How to explain the “journalists” at the Yahoo! front page writing about a giant in journalism? You can bet that you wouldn’t find a newspaper spelled one way in The Washington Post:

the uc

and another way in the same publication:

fp the lc

Which is correct? Check the paper’s masthead for the preferred capitalization. In this case, it’s The Washington Post.

When tales are reports

Huh? I have no idea what this means on the Yahoo! front page:

fp tales are reports

Does this mean that some tales are not tales, but reports? What kind of reports? Book reports? Or does “just reports” mea “just gossip” or “just secondhand info” or “just rumors” or “just newspaper reports”? I’m so confused.

What’s a cozy’s?

I don’t know what a cup cozy is, but I do know this isn’t its plural on Yahoo! DIY:

cozys apost diy

Seriously. What is wrong with the writers at DIY? They can’t seem to form a plural without an apostrophe and an S. The plural of cozy is cozies. No apostrophe.

Oscar de la Renta: The go-to

In an attempt to pay tribute to the late Oscar de la Renta, the folks at yahoo.com come up with a little creative capitalization:

fp la renta

(I think Mr. de la Renta was more than just a “go-to” for women. Perhaps he was the “go-to” designer.)

As if that weren’t enough creativity, one writer for Yahoo! Style thought this was the correct way to capitalize the designer’s name:

de la renta style

and another Style writer had a completely different take on de la Renta:

renata style

I think that if you’re going to be lauding a man whose name is so well-known, you should be able to spell it correctly.

Isn’t that the only way to score?

You don’t have to be a baseball aficionado to know that the only way to score a run is in an inning. Because runs scored during the seventh-inning stretch just don’t count. Thanks to Captain Obvious at the Yahoo! front page for this news:

fp in the inning

It might have been a tad more informative if the writer had deigned to tell us which inning the run was scored.

It took a whole team to write this badly?

Here’s a shocking admission from Yahoo! Style: This article, and all its errors, was written by “Yahoo Style Editors.” Apparently it takes more than one editor to screw up this badly. In general first ladies doesn’t get capital-letter treatment (at least according to most authorities, including the Associated Press). And no authority would OK the use of an apostrophe in the plural houses. (But no article from Style would be complete without at least one apostrophe in a plural):

fl 1

One of those “Yahoo Style Editors” really ought to be able to spell the name of every U.S. president, so one of them should be able to spell every president’s wife’s name, too. Like Nancy Reagan:

fl 2

I kinda think that’s inexcusable. And I’m horrified that the writers think that Hillary Clinton was inaugurated in 1997. She never had her own inauguration. She did, however, attend her husband’s 1997 inauguration.

Those “editors” could use a little tutelage in the use of a spell-checker:

fl 3

Lordie, lordie. Doesn’t anyone in the group of “Yahoo Style Editors” know how to spell? Or use a dictionary? Or a spell-checker?

fl 4

And finally there’s just one more lie they have to tell. (It’s probably not a lie so much as an inability for the combined brains of “Yahoo Style Editors” to understand words of more than two syllables.) Mrs. Clinton did not wear an embellished gown to her husband’s second term ceremony. She wore one to her husband’s second-term Inaugural Ball.

That’s usually the case

Yes, a resemblance is usually a similar resemblance, and we have the genius writer at Yahoo! Style to tell us that:

jig-jagged style

What she hasn’t told us is the meaning of jig-jagged. Did she make up that word? Yes. What she calls jig-jagged lines looks like zigzag lines to me.

I am not a table

Are the folks at Yahoo! DIY asking me what my story is?

tells a story diy

I ask because it seems that every table tells a story. But I am not a table. So why do they want to know my story? Maybe they mean “What’s your table’s story?” Is that so difficult to write? Apparently it is for some people.

Back to school for you!

Could the writer of this module on the Yahoo! front page be a college graduate? I’m not sure. I’d expect a college graduate to know that an apostrophe is required in “Parents college debt nightmare”:

fp college debt

I’d expect that a college graduate could read an article and summarize it accurately. And that’s when I realized that perhaps this writer is still in high school, struggling with understanding text written for a tenth grader. That’s how I’d explain the allegation that these parents owe a huge sum “nearly a decade after the graduation.” Since the parents have more than one daughter, I wanted to know whose graduation was a decade ago. So I read the article and learned that these folks borrowed the money a decade ago — not that their daughters graduated a decade ago.

To the writer, I’d say, stay in school and get that high school diploma. To readers of yahoo.com, I say don’t believe what you read.

Doe a Deere, a female Deere

What an embarrassment for everyone at Yahoo! Style:

doe deer

Who the heck works for a “style” site and can’t spell makeup? And how the heck did the misspelling of Doe Deere (the subject of the article) make it into a headline and past the editor’s eyeballs?

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