That’s not nice

It’s not nice to laugh and point at others who have stumbled. Case in point, the writer for Yahoo! News’ “Trending Now” who has a little problem with English:

case and point ledge

I point this out to be instructive: The idiom is case in point.  And any father would be wise to keep a baby off a building’s ledge. But it wasn’t a ledge that was attracting the toddler; it was a balcony.  As Mark Twain once said, “The difference between the right word and the nearly right word is the same as the difference between lightning and the lightning bug.

Headline mix-up

I can’t imagine what a “pregnancy mix” would be, but it sounds like it involves multiple sperm donors and a Waring blender.

mix shine

An alternate explanation? This is just one more mix-up on Yahoo! Shine.

It can accommodate one more

It’s surprising (at least to me) to see this word misspelled on Yahoo! Movies:

accomodate movies

It’s on everyone’s list of the most commonly misspelled words, so I thought a professional writer — especially one who doesn’t deign to use a spell-checker — would be familiar with that list and would take extra care when pounding out one of those words. But noooo. The writer just doesn’t know (or care) that accommodate can accommodate two M’s.

Littler little-known

Little-known just got littler on Yahoo! Sports:

litte sports

That explains a lot

If you’ve wondered how the many egregious mistakes made by Yahoo!’s writers can go uncorrected, consider these excerpts from an article written by Yahoo! Shine’s senior fashion and beauty editor.

You’d expect that a senior fashion and beauty editor could spell the name of designer Monique Lhuillier, wouldn’t you? But she gets it wrong here

palate 1

and here:

palate 4

Designer Galia Lahav doesn’t fare much better:

palate 3

Finally (although I can’t say for certain that this is the last error in the article), there’s this embarrassing homophonic error:

palate 2

A palate is the roof of a mouth; a palette is the board artists use to hold and mix paints, or a range of colors.

If a senior editor is a careless writer who can’t be bothered to proofread and confuses common homophones, is it any wonder that writing on Yahoo! is so amateurish?

A whopping misspelling

That’s a whopper of a misspelling on Yahoo! Shine:

whopping cough shine

The disease is whooping cough.

Not affordable?

I guess maybe a spell-checker just isn’t affordable for the folks at the Yahoo! front page:

fp affordabe

Let’s hope this puts an end to the typos on yahoo.com:

fp and end

How did Vera Wang start the trend?

There’s apparently a new trend in wedding gowns. It was started by Vera Wang with “pink and collections.”

fp pink

Thank you, yahoo.com writer, for enlightening us.

Devaluing your words

There’s a place for repetition and redundancy in writing. It can help you emphasize an important fact. It can help remind your readers of something of value. But redundancy can also frustrate your readers and leave them with the impression that you’re a careless writer or worse. In the case on the Yahoo! front page, the redundancy makes the writer look a little vocabulary-challenged:

fp devalue

Since devalue means “to lessen or cancel the value of” (American Heritage Dictionary), “devalue the worth of” means “lessen the value of the worth of.” A tad redundant or maybe just nonsensical.

Is it contagious?

Just a few days ago, someone at Yahoo! thought you could spell manager with only one A. So, is it surprising that another misspelled manager showed up on yahoo.com?

fp manger

Are typos now contagious?

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