Look closely at this

You don’t have to read closely to spot this grammatical gaffe on the Yahoo! front page:

fp to read close

The number is close to one

The number of errors that you’ll find in this sentence from Yahoo! Celebrity is close to one:

number are celeb

It’s so close to one, that it is one. And it’s a common subject-verb disagreement when the subject is number. Here’s what the American Heritage Dictionary says about number as a collective noun:

As a collective noun number may take either a singular or a plural verb. It takes a singular verb when it is preceded by the definite article the: The number of skilled workers is increasing. It takes a plural verb when preceded by the indefinite article a: A number of the workers have learned new skills.

Everyone needs an editor

The editor in chief over at Yahoo! Style could use a little help in the editing department:

us editors style

If you think readers don’t care about grammar, here’s what one person said about the article:

Joe, you commented . . .”but upon careful inspection we did realize that she pulled off a styling trick that us fashion editors – and Carrie Bradshaw – have been doing for years.” As Editor in Chief, I hope you recognize your grammar faux pas. “Us fashion editors” needs to be & quot;we” with no two ways about it! As I tell my students, “Check your work!” You would be wise to do the same!

Wondering about wanderlust

Those wacky editors over at Yahoo! Style are at it again with their crazy-ass vocabulary and their grammatical blunders:

wanderlust style

In their world, wanderlust isn’t an obsession or impulse to travel. It’s a synonym for wanderers or travelers (which, of course, it isn’t to the rest of us). Maybe. That’s the only explanation I can offer to the use of the pronoun their. It needs an antecedent (the thing it refers to) and it looks like the reader has to supply it, since the writer didn’t.

Writer of anarchy

If you’ve never seen than mistaken for then, or haven’t seen the compound adjective 30-second without its hyphen, then you haven’t been reading Yahoo! DIY.

soa 1

What would Yahoo! DIY be without its very own misuse of it’s for its?

soa 2

Somehow in that same article, this got past the eagle-eyed editors:

soa 3

I think it has something to do with wearing a pattern to keep your head warm. Frankly, I think a hat would be warmer than a pattern.

Of course there are more typos, like this one below:

soa 4

Call me old-fashioned, but I appreciate the well-placed hyphen and the beauty of a real dash (like this: —) and not a puny hyphen:

soa 5

Also, I think pronouns (like them) should refer to a noun that’s actually present in the same sentence. Or paragraph. Or article.

An delightfully unconventional word

Do you recognize the objects tied around the box, below? The writer for Yahoo! DIY didn’t:

ticket stub 2

She claims they’re ticket stubs:

ticket stub 1

They are not. They are actual tickets. Ticket stubs are the part of a ticket that the buyer keeps as a receipt.

So, the writer occasionally has trouble with choosing the right word. Sometimes the result is a delightfully unconventional stumble. Sometimes the result is a mismatch of a subject (like perforation) and verb (like help). Either she meant to type perforations or she meant to type helps or she meant exactly what she typed. Which would be not so delightful.

This doesn’t sound good

Everything in this sentence on Yahoo! Sports sounds good until you get to the verb. And then a little subject-verb clash happens:

sounds good sports hp

The subject is plural; the verb should be, too. And that would be sound.

What a crock!

This article on Yahoo! DIY has a promising start: The writer, whose title is actually editor, gave the trademarked Crock-Pot its due with capital letters and a hyphen. Then the wheels fell off:

crock pots diy

She has a little trouble with the extraneous them, which was just dropped in for no reason. And more trouble with the pronoun they, which requires a plural antecedent (the object it refers to); there’s just none other than recipes and that makes no sense. Of course, we know she should have used the singular it, referring to Crock-Pot, which is how she should have spelled the trademarked name of the slow cooker.

Writer’s ridiculous spelling

I have no explanation for why the writer for the Yahoo! front page would add an apostrophe to the plural stars. None.

fp stars apost

Never know whom to thank?

If you spotted this grammatical error on the Yahoo! front page, thank a teacher:

fp who to tip 2

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 822 other followers

%d bloggers like this: