This could have an adverse effect on readers

Maybe if you’re writing for Yahoo! Finance, you have dollars on the brain and hence, use both a dollar sign and the word dollars:

affect fin

One or the other is sufficient, really. Simple mistakes like that could have an adverse effect on your readers.

1 sneaky typo source of typos

OK, so maybe it’s not so sneaky. Maybe it’s right in front of your nose and the nose of all the people at Yahoo! front page who should be proofreading before publishing:

fp sugar

It isn’t decent

This might be a decent article from Yahoo! Style — if it weren’t for the errors. The writer could make the age decent with a couple of hyphens: 20-year-old. (Omitting a hyphen from an age is one of the top three hyphen errors you’ll see on Yahoo!.) The paragraph might be decent if the writer appreciated the difference between decent and descent — and if the writer told us how polite the subject is:

decent style

Try to keep your story straight

It must be hard for some people to keep information in their heads. Some people can write a paragraph and just can’t remember what they wrote minutes later. Take this excerpt from Yahoo! Style:

ball 1

We can’t expect a writer to remember that there’s no hyphen in nonprofit. Nor that there’s no “the Barbados.” Nor that amongst is considered a pretentious variation of among to American ears. But she might remember that she wrote about a foundation created in honor of Rihanna’s grandmother.

Dang! If you hadn’t told us this, I would have believed that the foundation was in honor of her grandmother:

ball 2

See? She forgot what she wrote in the preceding paragraph. That’s maybe too much info for anyone to recall.

Perhaps next time she pounds out an article for which she is paid real money to write, she’ll remember that a peak is a top and a peek is a quick look:

ball 3

That’s usually the case

Yes, a resemblance is usually a similar resemblance, and we have the genius writer at Yahoo! Style to tell us that:

jig-jagged style

What she hasn’t told us is the meaning of jig-jagged. Did she make up that word? Yes. What she calls jig-jagged lines looks like zigzag lines to me.

Not to knock your writing, but…

Not to knock Yahoo! Style, but I think the quality of its content would be greatly improved if it were written by people actually familiar with English:

knock against style

Maybe if they employed college graduates familiar with common idioms and with using Google to check the spelling of characters (like, say, Maleficent), the writing wouldn’t be so amateurish. And if their writers knew that one of five “women” is actually a one-year-old baby, another is a doll, and another is a Lego figure, the word choices might be also be a bit more accurate.

I guess I really was knocking Yahoo! Style.

It’s not a bum rap

Yahoo! Style writers will soon have a reputation for being the worst professional writers on the Net. And it’s not a bum rap. It’s well deserved:

bum wrap diy

This is a bum wrap:

bum wrap 2

An undeserved negative reputation is a bum rap. That’s something entirely different.

Also entirely different are hit the town (which means to party, usually implying some bar-hopping) and hit town (which means to arrive).

One one, one and too many

It just takes one one to make it one one too many on the Yahoo! front page:

fp one one

And just one and to make it one and too many:

fp and and

Can the headline be saved?

I haven’t been to Olive Garden in decades. I haven’t been to the Olive Garden ever. So, is it just me or is the superfluous (nay, wrong) in this headline on yahoo.com?

fp the olive garden

Will be today’s be the worst

Yes, it is confusing, isn’t it. But here’s something just as confusing on Yahoo! Music:

next yearfs be music

The writer meant “the pop star will be next year’s main attraction” or “the pop star will be the main attraction.” Or something else. You decide.

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