That’s quite a vocabulary you have!

How about we all agree that the writer for Yahoo! News’ “Trending Now” uses words in a new way. Maybe not the way the words were intended to be used, but at least he’s creative.

When he has an issue with something, he doesn’t tackle it, he doesn’t address it, he solves it! Just as if it were a problem. And when discussing a refrigerator, he lets you know that his has a bin on the front door (and apparently a back door, too?) and not shelves. When reading his articles, you also run into words that get split into two words:

fridge news 1

I didn’t know what an egg container was until I read further. Silly me, I thought it was the eggshell. But no, it’s the egg carton. (At least that’s what it’s commonly called in the U.S.)  This guy also loves the sound of his own typing. Instead of telling us that Mr. Brown places each bottle upside down, he goes on and on:

fridge news 2

And what about those crevasses? A crevasse is a deep fissure or crack, like in a glacier or a levee. I suspect the writer meant crevice, which is the wrong word also. A crevice is a narrow crack or opening. The compartments of an egg carton are called compartments or dimples.

Downright embarrassing

As anyone who’s ever been duped by something they’ve read on Yahoo! Shine can attest, the site has some problems. There are problems with the accuracy of some articles. Like the claim that Shine had pictures of Prince George in Australia — days before he arrived there. And, of course, there are problems with grammar and spelling and word choice.

Not all mistakes are horrid, like this sentence with an extra word and the breakup of a perfectly fine word into two words:

praying 1

But some goofs are downright embarrassing:

praying 2

I’m assuming that the writer meant preying (which means victimizing). But co-counsil? Is that the bastard child of a council mating with a counsel?

Blogger says claims too many words

UPDATE: On rereading this, I believe I was mistaken. It is not a case of an extraneous word, but a case of what looks like two verbs when it’s really a case of one verb (says) and a noun (claims). I wouldn’t have been so confuddled if this were: …Putin says that claims…

I think there’s at least one word too many on the Yahoo! front page:

fp says claims

How did Vera Wang start the trend?

There’s apparently a new trend in wedding gowns. It was started by Vera Wang with “pink and collections.”

fp pink

Thank you, yahoo.com writer, for enlightening us.

Devaluing your words

There’s a place for repetition and redundancy in writing. It can help you emphasize an important fact. It can help remind your readers of something of value. But redundancy can also frustrate your readers and leave them with the impression that you’re a careless writer or worse. In the case on the Yahoo! front page, the redundancy makes the writer look a little vocabulary-challenged:

fp devalue

Since devalue means “to lessen or cancel the value of” (American Heritage Dictionary), “devalue the worth of” means “lessen the value of the worth of.” A tad redundant or maybe just nonsensical.

See pictures before it happens!

Now on Yahoo! Shine you can view pictures of Prince George in “the Australia,” days before he actually arrives!

the australia

Prince George and his parents are scheduled to visit “the Australia” on April 16, but Shine has pictures now of his visit, six days before he arrives!

Watch this!

Do you think the editor was watching the Yahoo! Shine writer compose this headline?

watches on shine

I hope not. I hope a real editor knows that watch means “to look on” and that the on is redundant. Either “…as Kate Middleton watches” or “…as Kate Middleton looks on” is correct. (Of course, there are those who would also argue that referring to Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, as “Kate Middleton” constitutes a higher crime.)

Countless errors

If there are so many errors that they can’t be counted, there are countless errors. Here’s just one more on the Yahoo! front page:

fp countless

I can’t figure out if “countless numbers” is an oxymoron, but I’m sure that there’s no need for “numbers of.”

Blogger proofreads says proofreading…

What are the odds that someone — anyone — proofread this sentence on the Yahoo! front page?

fp walks says walking

I’d say slim to none.

And then I wrote… And then I wrote…

The is from the from the Yahoo! front page:

fp from the from the

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