It leaves a bad taste in my mouth

Is your sense of taste so unusual that you’d describe it as a “stray random palate”? Or is it the roof of your mouth that’s a really weird palate? I’m trying to picture what the writer for Yahoo! DIY meant and how anyone could transform their palate into a holiday keepsake. The image is not pretty:

palate diy 1

So, I was willing to overlook the random palate, and accept that it was a random typo — until I saw the instructions from making that Christmas tree:

palate diy 2

I never, ever thought that there were people who didn’t know the difference between a palate and a pallet. But that was before I started reading Yahoo!.

Lots of one guest

Just what is the fate of your guest during the holidays? The lots of a guest mentioned on Yahoo! DIY has me wondering:

youre guests diy

Maybe that’s supposed to guests! Yes, that’s the ticket. But now I have to figure out why those folks at Yahoo! said “you are guests.” Are they inviting us all over for a little eggnog?

Writer of anarchy

If you’ve never seen than mistaken for then, or haven’t seen the compound adjective 30-second without its hyphen, then you haven’t been reading Yahoo! DIY.

soa 1

What would Yahoo! DIY be without its very own misuse of it’s for its?

soa 2

Somehow in that same article, this got past the eagle-eyed editors:

soa 3

I think it has something to do with wearing a pattern to keep your head warm. Frankly, I think a hat would be warmer than a pattern.

Of course there are more typos, like this one below:

soa 4

Call me old-fashioned, but I appreciate the well-placed hyphen and the beauty of a real dash (like this: —) and not a puny hyphen:

soa 5

Also, I think pronouns (like them) should refer to a noun that’s actually present in the same sentence. Or paragraph. Or article.

Reverse that

It’s not unusual for a writer to use the possessive pronoun its when the contraction it’s is called for. So, I wasn’t surprised to see this goof on Yahoo! DIY:

its list diy

What did surprise me was that the writer uses it’s instead of the correct its:

its list diy 2

She’s really, really confused. But she can clear up this problem by writing it’s every time she thinks its is correct — and vice versa.

All it needs is a little paint

In an article about paint colors, the Yahoo! DIY writer gets a bit confused by a homophone:

pallet diy

This is a pallet; throw some paint on it and it’d be a color pallet:

pallet diy 2

A range of colors is a color palette.

If you can’t spell it, should you be writing about it?

Oh, com’on! You’re writing about a subject that you can’t even spell? Really? How the heck did the writer for Yahoo! DIY not know that stationery is writing paper and stationary is a something standing still?

stationary diy

What do harried shoppers hoard?

What do hordes of harried shoppers hoard? That’s what I want to know after reading this on Yahoo! DIY:

hoards of shoppers

For people concerned about the impression they make, correct grammar is a chance to display their intelligence to friends and family (and maybe instill pride in themselves, too).

People who write correctly know not to change person in a sentence.They know that if you start writing about “people on a budget” you don’t switch to “yourself,” but rather use the pronoun “themselves” because its antecedent is “people.”

These ideas make for hilarity

Do you find this as funny as I do? I think it’s hilarious that the writers for Yahoo! DIY keep mistaking a palate (which is the roof of your mouth) with a palette (which is a range of colors):

palate diy

Some ideas make me double over with laughter. Or pain. One of those ideas is that people actually get paid to write this stuff.

Your readers are sure to eat this up

You’re sure to impress your readers with a misspelled word and a contraction when a possessive pronoun is called for. Do them both in a single sentence and you could qualify for a job at Yahoo! DIY:

reptillian youre diy

Shave or a haircut? What’s your favorite?

All you barbers out there, here’s a poll for you: Which service do you prefer to give a customer? A shave or a haircut. Let me know in the comments. While I’m waiting for the responses to flood in, I think I’ll amuse myself with this homophonic horror from Yahoo! DIY:

barber poll diy

This is what the writer meant: It’s a barber pole:

barber pole

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