Editing recommendations were inadequate

For years I’ve been recommending that Yahoo! stop outsourcing the writing on yahoo.com to non-English-speaking countries. But it appears that my recommendations on editing were inadequate:

fp was

Yahoo! continues to employ grammatically challenged staffers. Is it so hard to match a subject (like, oh, say, maybe recommendations) and a verb (like were)? Is it so hard to find writers who can do that?

Apparently it is hard. Because here’s another verb flop from this morning’s yahoo.com:

fp take

The subject of that sentence is one, and it’s singular because, well, because it is one. It takes takes as a verb. The editor must have been on a lunch break when that got posted.

Chances are you wouldn’t make this mistake…

…unless you write for yahoo.com:

fp chances takes

The chances are good that if you’re not a writer or editor for Yahoo!, you’d recognize the subject (chances) is plural and the verb (take) should be, too .

Second day of errors takes shape

OK, so maybe I wasn’t completely accurate. This is hardly the second day of errors from Yahoo!, but the title of this post does illustrate the correct verb for the subject day — unlike this headline from Yahoo! News:

take shape news

One out of three readers has a problem with grammar

OK, so I made up that stat. I don’t know what percentage of people have a problem with grammar. Unless we’re talking about the people who write for the Yahoo! front page. Then I’d guess that it’s three out of three people:

fp one have

Clearly someone (or someones) didn’t know that the subject of that sentence is one, and one is singular and therefore takes the singular verb has.

A writer’s influence on their readers

It shouldn’t be surprising that when people starting using they, their, and them to refer to an individual whose gender was unknown to the writer that there would come a time that those pronouns would be used for an individual whose gender was apparent. That time has come and the place is Yahoo! Style:

their daughters

Did the writer use their instead of her because she didn’t know the mother was a female or because the writer didn’t know that a pronoun should agree with its antecedent?

Where prices are superfluous

Regardless of what they might think at yahoo.com, readers aren’t interested in the cheapest and most expensive beer prices, they’re interested in the cheapest and most expensive beer, except for people like me who don’t care for beer or football:

fp varies

Everyone, including me, likes a verb matched to its subject, so we’re not crazy about the use of varies (which should be vary) because the subject (cost and size) is plural.

Not a good place for that

Headlines in mile-high letters are not good places for grammatical errors.

thats sports

I bet the writer for Yahoo! Sports would really be embarrassed to learn that his that’s should be that are.

Me and my dog were appalled

Holy Milk Bone! Even my dog Millie would know that this is a giant grammatical gaffe on Yahoo! Answers:

me and my dog answers

If the writer had said that in front of my mother, he or she would have gotten a smack upside the head. She taught me and all my siblings that you never put yourself first. If the writer had put my dog first, then it would be obvious that the correct pronoun is I, not me: my dog and I were. At least I hope it would be obvious.

Here’s a better way to thank someone

You know what would be a better way for the editor in chief of Yahoo! Style to thank someone? Getting his name right:

paul style

This misspelling isn’t even close. The president and publisher is Paul Turcotte. The writer could also show some respect for his readers by employing correct grammar. He should be thanking Mr. Turcotte for “having Gigi and me,” not “Gigi and I.”

Take a critical look these errors

Behold the errors from Yahoo! Movies:

ic truck movies

There’s no shortage of creativity when it comes to hyphen usage. These folks can’t decide if it’s “ice cream truck” or “ice-cream truck” or the truly original “ice cream-truck.”

Not confined by the rules of grammar, the writer seems to think it’s okie-dokie to use the plural pronouns them and they to refer to the singular truck. It’s not.

And if you take a critical look at this paragraph you might spot another goof: A missing word.

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