Just kidding

Everything from the headlines to the teasers to the links has been proofread on yahoo.com:

fp have

Just kidding. Clearly that sentence, with its mismatched subject and verb, escaped the eyes of the proofreaders and editors.

This is for whoever wrote that

Whoever wrote this for the Yahoo! front page has a problem with grammar:

fp whomever

The pronouns whoever and whomever signal a dependent clause; the choice of pronoun to use depends on its function in the dependent clause. In this case, it is the subject of the verb shot; therefore, the correct word is whoever.

This headline make me want to cry

This headline, with its subject-verb disconnect, makes me want to cry:

blog make us travel

Does anyone at Yahoo! Travel proofread?

Maybe Mitt Romney was right

When Mitt Romney claimed during his bid for the presidency that “corporations are people, too,” he was met with derision. But he may have been right, if you believe what you read on the Yahoo! front page:

fp who for that

The pronoun who is reserved for human beings. Is yahoo.com alleging that companies are people? Or did the writer fail to realize that the correct pronoun is that?

You think they’re fed up?

Two stars with the Colorado Rockies are fed up with losing. I wonder if the writers for the Yahoo! front page are fed up with being featured on Terribly Write. Here we go again, with a misspelled Gonzalez and a mismatch of the singular neither with the plural verb want:

fp gonazlez

Say goodbye to English

Say goodbye to English. When a writer can’t match a subject and verb, it feels like the language is dying. The writer for Yahoo! TV apparently thinks “Rizzoli & Isles” is two people. It’s actually the name of one TV program, so it’s singular and its verb should be singular, too:

say goodbye tv

This is a sorry excuse for writing

I’m sorry to say it, but it’s hard to believe that this article from Yahoo! Shine was produced by a professional writer. Heck, it’s hard to believe it was written by a middle school graduate.

There are a few minor problems, like needlessly capitalizing a word. “Sorry” doesn’t get a capital letter unless it’s at the start of a sentence or you’re writing about the board game:

sorry 1

This is a sorry attempt at making a possessive out of women:

sorry 2

(To form the possessive of a plural noun not ending in S, just add an apostrophe and S: women’s, men’s, children’s.)

Things get a little sorrier with an error-filled paragraph, which includes a subject-verb mismatch (the subject study takes the verb has identified):

sorry 3

A “verbal tick” sounds like a talking, bloodsucking arachnid. If the writer meant an idiosyncratic and habitual behavior, that would be a tic. Then there’s the issue of the pronoun they, which has no antecedent. Just who is they? The rest of the sentence is just a mess. If you’re still reading that article at this point, I feel sorry for you.

He and his wife’s decision is wrong

Is there anyone in the English-speaking world (besides the writer for Yahoo! TV) who thinks this is correct?

he and his wife tv

I have no explanation for why the writer would think he is correct, unless the writer is a fourth-grade dropout. Anyhoo, the correct phrase would be “his and his wife’s decision,” which is a bit awkward. I’d probably suggest a rewrite: the decision he and his wife made…

Depends on whom you ask

How many errors have there been on Yahoo! News? Hundreds? Thousands? I don’t really know and I don’t think there is anyone to tell the tale of homophonic errors, like this one:

tail news

Is this correct? It depends on whom you ask. A Yahoo! writer and editor would think that who is the correct pronoun and have their been is really cool:

who you ask news

Well, there have been many, many errors on Yahoo! News. And these are just a few more.

We’re in complete disagreement

It’s not uncommon to see a disagreement between a subject and its verb on Yahoo! When that grammatical gaffe occurs on the home of Yahoo! News, I have to wonder about the accuracy of the article. I’m not sure I’d trust a site that gets the verb wrong here:

marks news

and here:

heighten news

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