And bad days sit around doing nothing

Good days work. Bad days don’t. What does that have to do with the talks surrounding the situation in Ukraine? You’d have to ask the writer for Yahoo! News responsible for this:

good days work news

OK, so we all know that the writer meant: Good day’s work. That’s what the Associated Press calls a quasi possessive. Other examples include: three years’ experience, two weeks’ pay, and a good night’s rest.

Editor’s quick thinking saves headline

If only it were true. If only an editor had read this headline on Yahoo! Shine before it was published it might have included an apostrophe (for teens’) and the correct verb:

teens quick thinking shine

The writers’ age factor

Just what is the writers’ age factor (besides being an extremely awkward phrase)? Does a writer’s age have an influence on the quality of his or her writing? There’s lots of anecdotal evidence that those who graduated from high school in the last twenty years don’t have the same writing skills as their parents.  Is the writer for the Yahoo! front page — who forgot about a little apostrophe — one of those recent high school grads?

fp enrollees age

Let’s relegate that to the language dumpster

Let’s relegate the use of a hyphen after an adverb ending in -LY  to the Grammar Slammer. While we’re at it, let’s make a citizen’s arrest and haul in the Yahoo! Shine writer who also thinks that delegating is the right word:

delegating shine

I had never heard (or read) anyone use delegate when relegate was the word that was called for — until I started reading Yahoo!. Relegate means “to assign to an obscure place, position, or condition.” Delegate means “to commit or entrust to another.”

Is it chicken or just chicken-like?

Are chicken-fried vegetables anything like “chicken”-fried veggies? I think that one has been fried in a fat that was also used to fry chicken and the other was fried in something that was used to fry faux chicken. According to yahoo.com, you’ll find recipes for both on Yahoo!:

fp chicken-fried

No, thanks. I’m allergic

Nuts? No, thanks.

Maybe you weren’t asking if I wanted some of that salty stuff. Maybe you were trying to ask an entirely different question. But, the truth is, the folks at yahoo.com were asking: Nuts?

fp nuts

Why can’t they remember that if the words inside the quotation marks form a question, then the question mark goes inside, too? It’s a common mistake at Yahoo!, and it just drives me nuts.

Well known for all the wrong reasons

Writers are just as well known for omitting hyphens (in brand-new, for example) as they are for using the wrong word. Case in point: This sentence from Yahoo! Sports:

brand new sports

Soiree, foray. What’s the diff?

This is one of those articles from Yahoo! News that actually makes me feel sorry for the writer. Clearly, English is not his first language, and he’s being asked to write as if it were and as if he were a trained professional. It can’t be easy. So, that may be why he thinks sing-a-long makes sense as a verb. It does not:

soiree news 1

Of course, he meant sing along.

He may have thought that the adverb completely was called for here, but he’s wrong again. The correct word is complete:

soiree news 2

This is clearly just a typo (I hope), so he gets a bye with this:

soiree news 3

But “first soiree with Internet stardom” makes no sense whatsoever. I can hardly imagine what he thought he was writing:

soiree news 4

Could it be “first foray into Internet stardom”? Anyhoo, the writer also omitted an apostrophe after Keys (or perhaps it should be Keys’s, one never knows what Yahoo!’s standard is), but helpfully dropped an unnecessary (and incorrect) comma after called.

English is a difficult language to master. Maybe this writer could use a little help — from a competent editor.

Yahoo’s ‘colonapocalypse’: Blogger reacts

Why can’t the writers and editors for the Yahoo! front page get this right? It’s not that hard:

fp colon quot

In the U.S., the period and the comma go before the closing quotation mark; in other English-speaking countries, it goes after. But two punctuation marks always go after the closing quote, regardless of where you’re writing: the semicolon and the colon.

Your know your proofreading skill is sucky when…

You know your proofreading skills suck if you missed the typo and erroneous punctuation in this headline from Yahoo! Shine:

your know shine

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