Ack! It’s Auckland!

Ack! Someone at Yahoo! Shine misspelled Auckland. And that’s not all! There’s the incorrect whom. It should be who because it’s the subject of the verb, which is either was or wasn’t.

ackland whom

As for the abbreviation a.k.a (for “also known as”), the Associated Press style is without periods (aka), while the American Heritage Dictionary’s style is AKA.

Then we’ll tell you how to comb your out hair

You, too, can grow your out hair just like Jennifer Lawrence! Check out this article on Yahoo! Shine:

out hair

Guess what’s not a question

Why would anyone think that this headline on Yahoo! Shine is a question?

guess whos coming quest shine

That’s actually an imperative sentence: An imperative sentence gives an instruction, an order, a command, or a request. In this case, the writer is requesting that you guess who’s coming to the gala.

Who you callin’ loose?

Someone was asleep at the keyboard when this went live on Yahoo! Shine:

you loose shine

The word loose rhymes with noose, moose, and caboose. So there’s loose women with loose morals working for loose change. The word that starts with an L, but rhymes with news, muse, and coos is lose.

Downright embarrassing

As anyone who’s ever been duped by something they’ve read on Yahoo! Shine can attest, the site has some problems. There are problems with the accuracy of some articles. Like the claim that Shine had pictures of Prince George in Australia — days before he arrived there. And, of course, there are problems with grammar and spelling and word choice.

Not all mistakes are horrid, like this sentence with an extra word and the breakup of a perfectly fine word into two words:

praying 1

But some goofs are downright embarrassing:

praying 2

I’m assuming that the writer meant preying (which means victimizing). But co-counsil? Is that the bastard child of a council mating with a counsel?

Headline mix-up

I can’t imagine what a “pregnancy mix” would be, but it sounds like it involves multiple sperm donors and a Waring blender.

mix shine

An alternate explanation? This is just one more mix-up on Yahoo! Shine.

That explains a lot

If you’ve wondered how the many egregious mistakes made by Yahoo!’s writers can go uncorrected, consider these excerpts from an article written by Yahoo! Shine’s senior fashion and beauty editor.

You’d expect that a senior fashion and beauty editor could spell the name of designer Monique Lhuillier, wouldn’t you? But she gets it wrong here

palate 1

and here:

palate 4

Designer Galia Lahav doesn’t fare much better:

palate 3

Finally (although I can’t say for certain that this is the last error in the article), there’s this embarrassing homophonic error:

palate 2

A palate is the roof of a mouth; a palette is the board artists use to hold and mix paints, or a range of colors.

If a senior editor is a careless writer who can’t be bothered to proofread and confuses common homophones, is it any wonder that writing on Yahoo! is so amateurish?

A whopping misspelling

That’s a whopper of a misspelling on Yahoo! Shine:

whopping cough shine

The disease is whooping cough.

Do I have to draw you a picture?

A great photograph can convey feelings, emotions, and a surprising amount of information. It can save you words — as long as you pick the right pic. Here’s how a writer at Yahoo! Shine illustrated the benefits of coconut oil:

pic coconut oil

You, too, can be young, tall, and slim all while nonchalantly resting on a mailbox. Looks great! Hey, waiter, I’ll have another latte with Splenda and coconut oil!

And when I’m done sipping that coffee beverage, I’m going to clean my fridge because those miniblinds on the fridge’s glass door don’t clean themselves:

pic fridge window

Then I think I’ll make dinner. How does spaghetti carbonara sound? Only without the spaghetti. Kinda like this linguini on yahoo.com:

pic fp spag pic

I think the pictures and headlines on Yahoo! are far more entertaining that the actual articles.

Do you feel bad about your grammar?

The writer for Yahoo! Shine shouldn’t feel bad about herself for making this mistake — a lot of people (especially if they write for Yahoo!) make the same grammatical goof:

feel badly

As I’ve said before: If you’re trying to pick out a ripe peach by gently squeezing the fruit, but you’re wearing oven mitts, you might feel badly. If your emotional state is sad, depressed, anxious, or unhappy, you might feel bad.

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