Littler little-known

Little-known just got littler on Yahoo! Sports:

litte sports

Not affordable?

I guess maybe a spell-checker just isn’t affordable for the folks at the Yahoo! front page:

fp affordabe

Let’s hope this puts an end to the typos on yahoo.com:

fp and end

Is it contagious?

Just a few days ago, someone at Yahoo! thought you could spell manager with only one A. So, is it surprising that another misspelled manager showed up on yahoo.com?

fp manger

Are typos now contagious?

Thanks a milion!

Thanks a million to Yahoo! News for providing proof that everyone needs to proofread:

milion movies

When a spell-checker isn’t enough

I’m constantly bitching about the misspellings on Yahoo!. I don’t understand why writers don’t use a spell-checker to catch misspellings like immitations and annoucement. Sometimes, however, (actually, I say always) you need a real human bean spell-checker. Someone who could read this on Yahoo! Finance and know that it’s wrong:

as simple impossible finance

Let me make this as simple as possible: No spell-checker would flag that as incorrect.

Only a live proofreader or editor would spot this error — unless, of course, they work for Yahoo! Shine:

kicked our of shine

There’s no spell-checker that would notice that this isn’t the right word on Yahoo! News:

manger news

Kurt Cobain: Great artiss?

Kurt Cobain wasn’t the only great artiss to die to young, according to Yahoo! Music:

artiss music

How to attract crows

If you’re thinking of attracting birds to your backyard, don’t do what the folks at this rally did. According to Yahoo! News, the rally couldn’t even attract a large crow:

crow news

Where’s that?

Which country is “Orange Country”? I have no idea, no idea at all. Perhaps the writer for Yahoo! Music could enlighten me:

orange country

Could it possibly be that The Colourist, from Orange County, know the rockers from Orange Country?

Soiree, foray. What’s the diff?

This is one of those articles from Yahoo! News that actually makes me feel sorry for the writer. Clearly, English is not his first language, and he’s being asked to write as if it were and as if he were a trained professional. It can’t be easy. So, that may be why he thinks sing-a-long makes sense as a verb. It does not:

soiree news 1

Of course, he meant sing along.

He may have thought that the adverb completely was called for here, but he’s wrong again. The correct word is complete:

soiree news 2

This is clearly just a typo (I hope), so he gets a bye with this:

soiree news 3

But “first soiree with Internet stardom” makes no sense whatsoever. I can hardly imagine what he thought he was writing:

soiree news 4

Could it be “first foray into Internet stardom”? Anyhoo, the writer also omitted an apostrophe after Keys (or perhaps it should be Keys’s, one never knows what Yahoo!’s standard is), but helpfully dropped an unnecessary (and incorrect) comma after called.

English is a difficult language to master. Maybe this writer could use a little help — from a competent editor.

A news source you can trust?

How many typos, misspellings, and wrong word choices does it take before you question the credibility of a news article? If the article is written by a Yahoo! News staffer, I start with an attitude of skepticism, which is buttressed by the errors that are sure to be there.

I can count on there being at least one homophonic error. In this article, the writer claims an ice sculpture was discretely wheeled into a hotel suite:

cpac 1

Unless that sculpture was delivered in bits of ice cubes, it was brought in discreetly, so as not to attract attention.

A typo in a photo caption isn’t the worst thing you’ll find in the article:

cpac 2

But a second homophonic error just might be:

cpac 3

Perhaps it’s a rite of passage at Yahoo! News: You can’t get a byline until you’ve made at least three boneheaded mistakes in a single article.

Here’s a makeshift spelling of makeshift:

cpac 4

There’s nothing wrong with this paragraph except for the arbitrarily capitalized former and the spelling of Dinesh D’Souza and Cathy McMorris Rodgers:

cpac 5

Two of those mistakes would get you sent to the woodshed in a legitimate news organization. But wait! There’s more! Here, the writer claims there was a big band consisting of 16 pieces:

cpac 7

and yet in the photo caption, he’s added a musician:

cpac 6

Perhaps the writer was enjoying the contents of the kegerator when he wrote this:

cpac 8

and then forgot that if you use a dollar sign, you shouldn’t also use the word bucks (because that would be “20 dollars bucks”):

cpac 9

So, I’m not trustin’ too much (if anything) I read from this author. I guess for some, getting an article published is all that matters:

cpac 10

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