I should have stopped reading

I shouldn’t have read more than this headline on Yahoo! Style:

our stories 1

I should have known that if the headline contains one humongous goof, the article itself is going to be a disaster. The huge mistake in the headline? The article is about a retailer called & Other Stories. How bad is that? Bad. But it gets worse.

At least in the opening paragraph, the writer manages to use the correct words for the retailer, though she does close up the space after the ampersand:

our stories 2

But she drops the the in what should be “in the U.S.” and the hyphen that’s required in brand-new. Maybe the writer is a recent arrival to the States and doesn’t realize that it’s capitalized when referring to the United States.

When it’s a noun or an adjective, must-have must have a hyphen:

our stories 3

This could be a simple typo (names instead of named), but the use of the pronoun their without any known antecedent is just wrong:

our stories 4

How do you explain the misspelling of a product when it appears below a picture of the product?

our stories 5

The final sentence of the article doesn’t disappoint: One hardly ever sees the use of a plural verb with the singular everything:

our stories 6

That was not good. I knew when I read the headline I should have stopped reading. My bad.

Lessons from Yahoo Health

You can learn a lot just by reading the headlines at the home page of Yahoo! Health. You won’t learn anything about health, but you will learn what not to do when you write.

 

Lesson 1: Make sure your text isn’t longer than the space reserved for it.

You might read this and wonder “Sneak a workout in at what?” The opera? The line outside the ladies room at Yankee Stadium? Your kid’s piano recital? The options are endless.

miss word health

 

Lesson 2: Not every sentence beginning with what is a question.

This headline isn’t a question and “Listen to Your Body” isn’t a question. The only question is why would anyone think that question mark is necessary. Oh, and another question: How did you get a job as a writer?

what quest health

 

Lesson 3: You can’t always trust your spell-checker.

Facing a jury verdict and want to rise above it? You can! And you can do it in time for Race Day, which is apparently when you start running before they take you in for sentencing:

jury health

Sanother day, sanother typo

It’s another day and another typo from Yahoo! News:

sanother news

Chris Brown is not the only one

Chris Brown is not the only one who should plead guilty. I’m nominating the folks at the Yahoo! front page who didn’t catch this assault on the English language:

fp assult

Right below Yu Darvish’s what?

Yahoo! Sports suggests that Yu Darvish and his inflamed right below shouldn’t pitch again this season. That’s just wrong:

right below sports

That’s a typo that even a spell-checker (should Yahoo!’s writers deign to use one) wouldn’t catch. Of course, it’s his right elbow that’s left us wondering how a proofreader missed that.

What a nut!

You know what’s weirder than Blueberry Hazelnut Pringles? Blueberry Hazelnet Pringles!

hazelnet travel

Thanks for that, Yahoo! Travel.

American flighting for ISIL

Apparently an American was flighting (which I think is combat inside a plane) for ISIL, according to the ever-reliable Yahoo! News:

flighting news

Shark Week cut short

Is that a euphemism for the urine of a shark on Yahoo! TV?

shark wee tv

Is anyone oncerned about this?

It seems reasonable to assume that no one working on yahoo.com is the least bit concerned about accuracy, grammar, or spelling:

fp oncerns

Time for a new beginning

Is it me? Or are there more typos on Yahoo! Sports lately, especially in the category of ice hockey? Actually, it is me here, but it should be he:

boy find 2

When a boy finds a mismatched subject and verb, he should report it:

boy find 1

Maybe it’s time for a new beginning:

boy find 3

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