Whom just seems wrong

If you’re a conscientious writer who strives to be grammatically correct 100 percent of the time, but you still struggle with choosing between who and whom, take my advice: Choose who. If you’re wrong, 90 percent of your readers won’t know it and the rest won’t care. If you choose whom, you might be correct, but your writing will sound pretentious and stilted. And if you’re wrong, you might be mistaken for a writer for Yahoo! Shine:

whom had work shine

Could that sound any uglier? The correct word happens to be who, because the pronoun is the subject of the verb had. The pronoun who is the subjective case (and hence, the subject of verbs); whom is the objective case (and the object of verbs or prepositions).

Like tatting or whittling?

When you think of extremely old crafts, what comes to mind? Crocheting? Basket weaving? Carving duck decoys? The writer for the Yahoo! front page wants you to forget the real meaning of crafts (which is “items made by craftspeople”) and conjure up aircraft:

fp crafts

Yes, the people who think the projection at the top of a building is a spiral, who don’t know a boon from a boom, and who think patent and trademark are synonyms want you to interpret crafts to mean some sort of vehicle. (It’s interesting to note that according to the American Heritage Dictionary, when you mean ” a boat, ship, aircraft, or spacecraft,” then the plural of craft is craft.)

Because a joint interview separately is just silly

I am indebted to Yahoo! Celebrity for explaining that two people had a joint interview together. I guess doing a joint interview separately would present a logistical challenge:

joint together omg

Arriving at the wrong preposition

To someone just learning English, prepositions can be difficult to master. Those people should not be reading Yahoo! Sports, where writers often arrive at the wrong word:

arrived to camp sports

Johnny Manziel arrived at camp. He may have arrived in style. But he didn’t arrive to anything.

Holy typos, Batman!

Here’s a look at what you can find in a single day on the home page of Yahoo! TV.

A misspelling of Kit Harington:

harrington tv hp

Incorrect quotation marks around a character’s name:

batman quot tv hp

(If the writer were referring to the movie or TV show, the quotation marks would be okie-dokie, but the reference is to the character.)

I’d like to give a shout-out to the writer of this headline, but I can’t. It’s missing the hyphen that makes shout-out a noun:

shout out tv hp

How on God’s green earth do you explain this one? Did the writer first pound out it’s, decide that it’s wrong, and change it to it is?

it is tv hp

I bet the writer of this headline would like to turn back time and correct this blunder:

turining tv

Finally, another typo (how could anyone miss that?) and a second misspelling of Mr. Harington’s name:

harrington tv hp 2

It’s Opposites Weekend at Yahoo!

What the heck is going on at yahoo.com? Are we the victims of some prank, a case of Opposites Weekend? Yesterday I noticed that yahoo.com lied about Daniel Radcliffe being the only star in a disguise at Comic-Con. Now there’s this headline:

fp godzilla quot

First let’s dispense with the issue of the quotation marks. Unless Godzilla refers to the movie (and it doesn’t), there shouldn’t be quotes around it. The names of characters don’t get that sort of treatment. (Hmmm. Unless that’s not really his name…) Then the writer alleges that Godzilla will be fighting new foes. Baloney!

Here’s the headline from the article, replete with the incorrect quotation marks. Notice the words Old Foes?

fp godzilla quot 2

Is Yahoo! just messin’ with us? Or are the writers there really that incompetent?

Dmitri Young still the third heaviest

There’s just a minor problem on the Yahoo! front page:

fp mlb

The obvious gaffe involves some missing capital letters: Major League Baseball is a trademark of Major League Baseball, Properties, Inc. Less obvious? Dmitri Young wasn’t just the third heaviest player in the years he played; he was the third heaviest player in MLB history.

8-year-old becomes youngest man alive

How did an 8-year-old become the youngest man alive? By appearing in a headline on Yahoo! Shine:

8-yr-old man shine

That don’t look right. Somebody made a boo-boo: Either the 8-year-old was a boy or there’s a digit missing in the man’s age.

How one little word can make you look dumb

OK, how would you know if Daniel Radcliffe was the only star “to go incognito”? If someone is incognito, how can you tell they are a celebrity or not? It makes no sense. But here it is on the Yahoo! front page:

fp incognito

That allegation makes no sense because the writer left out one teensy word: not. Mr. Radcliffe was not the only star in a costume. How do I know? Because I can read. And the headline for the accompanying article is:

dan rad movies

Thank heavens the children are safe

This could have been so much worse if children were involved:

childen news

From: Yahoo! News

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