New record errors in one sentence

This might just be a new record for number of errors in a single sentence:

It’s unimaginable to me (and to most English speakers) how the writer could think that sentence is okie-dokie for publication. She didn’t notice that prices starts is a grammatical horror? Or that prices can start at $700 and also go up to $1500. But there’s only one starting price for any item.  And prices … is sold? That one made me spit out my sugar-free, nonfat vanilla latte. That’s so bad, I almost didn’t notice the random and totally unnecessary at.

Advertisements

I have a question

I have a question for the editors at Yahoo! Finance: Who the heck edited this? Anyone?

Am I supposed to mail my taxes to Yahoo!? Not a chance. If the intent was to tell readers to email a question, then them should be it.

Break down that word

The writer for  Yahoo! Finance needs to break down breakdown, which is a noun. (The verb is two words).

This is altogether wrong

This use of all together on Yahoo! Finance is altogether wrong:

The expression all together indicates a group performing some action collectively. The word that means “completely, entirely” is altogether.

Reactions to headline

Reactions to a headline on Yahoo! Style shine:

Actually, I don’t know what that means; I have no idea how reactions shine (or shines, as Yahoo! editors would have it).

Plus-size errors

What to do? What to do? What does one do if one can’t decide if a compound adjective needs a hyphen? Well, if one works at Yahoo! Style, one hyphenates it once, and leaves it unhyphenated once. Problem solved!

That solution is neither appropriate nor correct, just as the use of the word or, instead of nor, with neither is wrong.

Keep that word intact

Whenever I see intact spelled as two words I wonder what was going through the writer’s head. Like here on Yahoo! Beauty:

Did the writer think that the hairstyle was d being tactful?

I just can’t go on

I tried reading an article on Yahoo! Style, but I just can’t force myself to read beyond the first paragraph. It is so stunningly awful in its grammatical mistakes and ignorance of basic English, that I gave up. Here’s what I found with just a cursory examination of the ‘graph; I’m sure I missed a few things that merit attention:

My experience tells me that this writer is not a native English-speaker. Her mistakes are ones that are common with people who did not grow up speaking and writing English. But there’s no excuse for not providing her with a competent editor, if only to save her from embarrassments like these:

  • 18 years old should be 18-year-old. He is 18 years old, but he is an 18-year-old model.
  • instagram follower should be Instagram followers.
  • on first name term seems to be a bastardization of on a first name basis.
  • to loose his cherries for the first time is not just a vulgar expression, it’s kind of a stupid metaphor. First, she means lose, not loose. And one can only lose one’s cherry (which is singular) once. So I’m really confused as to what this is purported to mean. Maybe it just means the writer is both careless and ignorant.
  • There’s a missing the in at Coachella music festival.
  • will also be is redundant when one ends a sentence with too.
  • been to famous music festival needs a the.

I’m sure I missed something, and I didn’t even touch on the run-on sentences. Please, Yahoo!, get this gal an editor!

I didn’t even know heath needed care

The United States Congress will be voting on the care of heath:

I had no idea that heath care was even a thing or that it needed federal funding. Thank goodness Yahoo! News is here to keep us informed!

I’m just cury-ous

I’m cury-ous: How does a mistake like this on Yahoo! Style get past the editor and the spell-checker?

%d bloggers like this: