Bask in this!

I hopin’ one of my loyal readers can explain this sentence from Yahoo! Style:

Can you be “hugging onto” a person or simply hugging them? Or hanging onto them? What does that mean?

While you’re at it, maybe you can explain how one basks in firework beauty. Are you warmed by a single pyrotechnic device? Or are you enjoying fireworks, which is an actual display of the devices common on the Fourth of July.

Neither or nor have is correct

From Yahoo! Celebrity, two gaffes for the price of one:

Neither or nor the verb have responded is correct. The partner of neither is nor, not or. And when a compound subject is joined by the correlative conjunction neither…nor, the verb must agree with the subject closer to it. So, the verb should be has responded.

And then I stopped reading

I admit it. I really wasn’t interested in this article from Yahoo! Style, but I thought I could force myself to read it. And then I read it. Actually, I only read the first paragraph and couldn’t bring myself to read any further:

You may think you know Yahoo! writers, what with their use of incorrect words, but you don’t know half of it. My comments are based on the evidence (not based off of it). This paragraph is the latest brainchild of a Yahoo! writer (of “I don’t know where to put the parenthesis fame”).

How many pilots?

When a typo appears on Yahoo! News (at least I hope it’s just a typo), it can leave me scratching my head:

After dusting the dandruff off my keyboard, I have to ask: How many pilots were doin’ the asking? One pilot asks passengers to pray? Or two or more pilots ask passengers to pray?

I’m praying for an answer.

More thought, time and energy might help

The thought, time and energy that go into editing have not increased exponentially on Yahoo! Sports:

More thought, time and energy might have led to correcting the mismatched plural subject and singular verbs.

Who do you trust?

Would you consider Yahoo! News a trustworthy source of information if the editors either don’t proofread or can’t spot an obvious typo in a headline?

The word they were going for is affluenza, a blend of affluence and influenza, which joined the pop culture lexicon in 2013 when it was used in the defense of an obnoxious teen charged with four counts of intoxication manslaughter.

I hate to be a tattletale…

… but the editors at Yahoo! Sports broke up a perfectly good word:

A good time to stop

Yahoo! News makes a good case for stopping a search:

Incidents like these

Incidents of mismatched subjects and verbs are unfortunately common on Yahoo! Style:

This doesn’t pass the smell test

If only there were a way for the Yahoo! Style writer to verify the spelling of the captions she writes. Maybe if she had a picture of the eau de parfum she’s writing about, she wouldn’t make these misspellings:

Oh, wait! Here’s the actual picture that goes with that caption:

Maybe she didn’t think she needed to look at it. But when writing this caption:

. . . don’t you think she should have checked out the picture of the bottle of eau de parfum, which is quite different from cologne and eau de cologne:

Well, she finally got the product right in this caption:

. . .  but not the name of the manufacturer:

If these captions didn’t appear right next to the product pictures, perhaps no one would have noticed that the writer can’t copy words right under her nose. But they’re there and there’s no amount of eau de parfum that can cover the stink.

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