Just trying to help

Sitting here in my room in Miss Lilli Mae’s Boarding House and Bowling Lanes, I’m just trying to help Yahoo! News with a little proofreading:

Those writers and editors are under a lot of pressure to meet deadlines, I guess. So there’s no time for proofreading and missing words just stay missing.

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To kick off this post

To kick off this blog post about Yahoo! Style, I’m excited to share that neither the writer nor the editor knows the difference between a noun (like kickoff) and a phrasal verb (like kick off):

A couple of S’s?

It’s become almost a daily occurrence at Yahoo! Style: the inability to form possessive of a plural noun:

What the heck is so hard about this? If you’re writing about one couple, it’s couple’s. If more than one couple, it’s couples’. If you’re really confused, it’s couples’s and it’s wrong.

While I’m pondering the reason for that common mistake, perhaps you’ll solve another mystery for me: Why did the writer (and presumably her editor) refer to a boy with the pronoun her? Is this a transgender thing?

What do you call getting nauseated in a museum?

Sick at a museum? You may be suffering from ad nauseum! Sick of seeing misspellings on Yahoo! Style? Me, too. They seem to occur ad nauseam:

Neither the writer nor the editor was correct

Neither the writer nor the editor at Yahoo! Style was correct when they accepted this verb choice:

When a compound subject is joined by the correlative conjunction neither…nor, the verb must agree with the noun closer to it. That noun, groom, is singular and the verb should be was, not were.

Blogger is preparing to crack down

Someone at Yahoo! News should be preparing to crack down on editors who don’t know a noun (like crackdown) and a phrasal verb (like crack down):

Do you think a crackdown will actually happen?

Trump’d up charges

Are charges that Yahoo! News editors are careless just trumped up charges?

Maybe it’s only a typo and the editor really meant trumped. Or Trump’s.

I have nothing further to say

This appeared today on yahoo.com and nothing could be further from accurate than this use of farther:

Confused about the difference between further and farther? Here’s what the American Heritage Dictionary says:

Since the Middle English period many writers have used farther and further interchangeably. According to a relatively recent rule, however, farther should be reserved for physical distance and further for nonphysical, metaphorical advancement. Thus 74 percent of the Usage Panel prefers farther in the sentence If you are planning to drive any farther than Ukiah, you’d better carry chains, and 64 percent prefers further in the sentence We won’t be able to answer these questions until we are further along in our research.

Continually making an error

The folks at Yahoo! seem to make the same mistake continually. This time it’s Yahoo! News scribes who can’t tell the difference between continuously and continually:

I wasn’t in the Senate to verify this for myself, but I’m guessin’ that the legislation wasn’t being amended ceaselessly, without stop. But it may have been continually amended.

This appears to be wrong

One reader’s confidence in Yahoo! News appears to be shaken when the editors can’t match a singular subject (confidence) with the correct verb:

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