Just call it a holiday

When I read this on the front page of Yahoo Finance, I attributed the inconsistent spelling of the February holiday to carelessness:

But it could just be the result of laziness: The editors at Yahoo didn’t bother to refer to any authorities on how to spell the holiday. But they weren’t so lazy that they couldn’t come up with yet another place to stick an apostrophe:

So, is it Presidents’ Day, Presidents Day, or President’s Day? According to the federal government, the correct name is Washington’s Birthday. But there is no universal agreement on whether to include an apostrophe in Presidents Day. The only universal agreement: Be consistent.

 

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Is this a Brendan Fraser conspiracy?

When I read this on yahoo.com, I thought the missing word may have been a careless error:

But now I’m not so sure. There may be a conspiracy over at the Internet giant to ruin the actor’s career. Why else would the editors run another story about the star of “The Mummy”?

The actor who may have been blacklisted and who may have been sexually assaulted is Brendan Fraser.

Should you share with colleagues?

Nothing makes a newsroom look more dysfunctional than the inability to spell a simple word the same way twice. Case in point: This headline from the home page of Yahoo Finance:

Was this just a simple typo? In an effort to sleuth out the truth, I looked at the article itself. The headline and text in the video are equally confused:

Maybe Yahoo writers should start sharing the same dictionary. Or maybe they should just refer to people you work with as colleagues.

Do you work for the same company?

Editors at Yahoo News seem to be unfamiliar with sports writer Ben Rohrbach — or at least how to spell his name:

That’s a little odd. Not just because it’s so easy to verify the spelling of a name (what with the Internet and all), but because Ben Rohrbach is a writer for “Big League Stew,” a column for Yahoo Sports:

You’d think the editors would know better or would at least try to avoid embarrassing themselves in front of millions of readers.

And then I fell aslee

Did the editors at yahoo.com suffer from an attack of narcolepsy before they could finish this sentence?

 

Would not be first time

This would not be the first time a word has gone missing on yahoo.com:

Ya’ll laugh

Y’all take a look at this headline; y’all be embarrassed for the yahoo.com editor:

The Southern express y’all is a colloquial contraction of you and all. The misplaced apostrophe in ya’ll makes that a contraction of ya (or you) and will. Y’all got that?

A lost win

I know virtually nothing about American football, but I do know that this tidbit on yahoo.com is wrong:

Philadelphia isn’t looking for its first Super Bowl. It’s looking for its first Super Bowl win. That’s kinda different.

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