It’s both avoidable and laughable

Yahoo! Movies makes a mistake that’s both avoidable and laughable:

both movies carradine

The correlative conjunction pair bothand must join two elements of the same type, like two nouns or two prepositional phrases.

Conjunction dysfunction

I wish the writer were trying to use both a balanced phrase and a correct placement of the correlative conjunction both…and in this excerpt from Yahoo! Shine:

both-trying-shine-beauty

Music and fashion hits and misses, but mostly misses

Someone should tell the writer of this headline on Yahoo! Shine that hits and misses aren’t acronyms:

hits-and-misses-1

And unless the writer is using those words ironically, there’s no need for the quotation marks (even the missing and misplaced ones):

hits-and-misses-2

It’s means it is, and it’s misused here:

hits-and-misses-3

Also misused are the quotation marks around House of Deréon:

hits-and-misses-4

It also would have been nice to include the é in both spellings of Deréon.

Again with the quotation marks!

hits-and-misses-5

And why use an ampersand instead of spelling out the word and? I guess someone was in a hurry and was trying to type as few characters as possible. No, that can’t be right, ’cause there’s an extra character in overpriced:

hits-and-misses-7

Finally, in that same hit-and-miss blog post, there’s this correlative conjunction miss:

hits-and-misses-6

A correlative conjunction must join two parallel items — in this case, since there’s an article before critical, there needs to be one before commercial.

Email slow? Could be lack of resources

With only two resources (whatever they are), it’s no wonder Yahoo! Mail is slow. At least that’s how this Yahoo! Mail help topic could be interpreted:

The writer may have meant “both wastes our resources and makes you appear…,” but the misplaced correlative conjunction both…and makes this one sloppy and possibly misleading sentence.

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