Talk about abrupt!

If there’s anything in this world that is abrupt, it’s this sentence on yahoo.com:

fo abrupt of

I think it’s like the word game Mad Libs, except readers are supposed to supply the missing word or words. So, gimme a noun and we’ll plug it into “the abrupt noun of Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort.”

Capital punishment

Stop. comparing. me. to. an. editor.

That could have been written by the editor at yahoo.com who isn’t clear when to capitalize mother:

fp my mother

Here’s a hint: Don’t capitalize mother, father, sister, and the like if the word is preceded by an adjective. So, it’s my mother, a great father, my mean-girl sister.

Once is a typo

If you transpose two digits when you’re typing a date, that could just be a typo. But if you do it twice, as this Yahoo! Style writer did, does it indicate something more serious?

1986 sty

The first modern Olympics was in 1896 in Greece. At least the writer got half of that right.

Copy-paste is your friend

How is it possible in a world of online words, that the writer for Yahoo! Style didn’t know enough to copy and paste a quote into the article she was writing? She apparently typed the quote and screwed it up rather badly:

supported sty

You might wonder why the American Immigration Council, which is opposed to Donald J. Trump’s immigration policies, said that they were “supported by the facts.” That’s because the council did not say that. They wrote, “Trump’s now well-established views on immigration policy are not only unsupported by the facts, but they are dangerous as well.” I’m pretty sure I got that right because I copied the words from the council’s website and pasted them into this post.

What could you ask a dress code?

Oh, to be a fly on the wall when a student made a formal request of a dress code. What could she ask for? What did the dress code say? And why am I talking about this? Because I read this on Yahoo! Style:

petitions sty hp

This is yet another case of an editor with a vocabulary deficit. She clearly has no idea what petition means and how to use it. As a verb petition means to ask for (by a petition) or to make a request. Maybe the student petitioned the school administration concerning the dress code. Maybe the student opposed the school dress code. Maybe the writer would learn some basic English.

Everyday error appears (almost) every day

It’s a common, everyday experience: Someone at Yahoo! Style uses the wrong word. This time an editor confused everyday (which means commonplace, ordinary, or routine) with every day (which means each day):

everyday style hp

Hocked? I’m shocked!

I’m shocked, but probably shouldn’t be. This Yahoo! Style writer (and her editor, if she has one) thinks that hocked means sold:

hocked sty

It does not. The verb hock means to pawn, as in, “she hocked her dictionary at the local pawn shop because she felt she didn’t need it.” The verb the writer should have used is hawked.

Why aren’t editors typically aren’t employed?

Why aren’t editors employed at Yahoo! Finance? They might actually prevent something like this:

arent arent fin

U.S. 8-year medal drought finally over

Forget what you think you know about Michael Phelps, the Final Five U.S. gymnasts, and Simone Manuel. It’s all a hoax. The United States of America hasn’t won a medal in the Olympics since 2008. At least until this boxer came along:

fp first medal

The long drought of losses and disappointment at the Olympics is finally over. At least according to Yahoo!.

Ha-ha. I kid. The truth is, Mr. Hernandez won the first medal in boxing for the U.S. since 2008. It’s just a teensy, weensy, itsy, bitsy detail that some editor forgot to mention.

Did they take back her diploma?

How do you become a former graduate of a school? If you’re a graduate of Parsons School of Design, aren’t you always a graduate? Or can the school rescind your diploma and make you a former graduate? Only the writer for Yahoo! Style knows:

former grad sty

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,158 other followers

%d bloggers like this: