Numbers are hard

Basic elementary school arithmetic has proven to be beyond the mastery of Yahoo! writers. Now we see that even writing a number is just too hard for one Yahoo! Style writer:

12thousand sty

Who writes like that? Who speaks like that? First, if you have to spell out part of the number (and why would you?), at least use thousand and not thousands. (B) Every style guide I’ve ever seen dictates that numbers that large should be written using numerals, not words.

Was it writers’s block?

Did the Yahoo! Style writer suffer a brain aneurysm or just writer’s block when it came to writing this?

sportss sty

She was probably wondering if she should have used the singular sport’s or the plural sports’ and couldn’t make up her mind, so she did a little melding. Or maybe she just has no idea how to form the possessive of a noun. ‘Cuz she made the same mistake in a photo caption:

winnerss sty

Mon dieu!

Mon dieu! Here’s a little intro to a video on Yahoo! Style that claims to teach us how to pronounce famous brand names. (I think the writer meant famous French brand names, but I quibble.) The problem? The writer has her own problems with French.

troiz sty

I can’t be sure, but I think the writer was trying to count to three in French, but misspelled trois. Then there’s something about a cat (chat) inside a dog (chien). Personally, I would have written chat et chien, which would be cat and dog. Let’s not overlook the misspelled Alliance and the missing hyphen in Roche-Posay.

But my favorite gaffe is in the actual video, where the writer just can’t get that accent right in Hermès:

hermes vid sty

Don’t you love those experts at Yahoo!? They’re illiterate in two languages!

Is that a pleasure-school administrator?

The crucial difference between Yahoo! Style editors and the rest of the English-speaking world? Yahoo! Style editors don’t know the difference between a principal (which is a school administrator or something that is highest in rank or importance) and a principle (which is a rule or standard):

pleasure principal sty

They just had to put that headline in the largest font imaginable. But, minutes later, the editors changed it! When I saw that they had added a picture to that headline, I was hopeful that they’d also see the error of their ways. But, noooo:

pleasure sty

Not an award-winning headline

This headline on the home page of Yahoo! Style isn’t going to win any journalism awards. Or proofreading awards:

epsy

Maybe the editor should have looked at the photo to see that it’s the ESPY Awards.

To whoever is reading this

To whoever is reading this: The Yahoo! Sports writer is confused about the use of whomever (which is the objective case of whoever and is used as the object of a preposition) and whoever (which can be the subject of a verb like was listening):

to whomever spo

This writer isn’t alone in his confusion. To many people, it appears that whomever is the object of the preposition to, but it’s the entire clause that’s the object of the preposition. And whoever should be the subject of the verb in that clause.

If you’re not into being grammatically nitpicky and you’re faced with the choice between who and whom or whoever and whomever, go with who or whoever. In more the half the cases, you’ll be correct, and even if you’re wrong, your writing will sound more authentic and less stilted and formal.

Hall of Fame error

If there were a Hall of Fame for the overuse of hyphens, Yahoo! Sports would be in it:

hall-of-fame sp

There’s no reason to hyphenate a proper noun, even when it’s used as an adjective.

Talents for talons

Everybody has some talents. I’m not sure what this Yahoo! Style writer’s talents are, but they seem to be something that a manicurist would file and paint:

talents 4 talons

I’m guessin’ one of her talents isn’t her vocabulary.

Katie Couric would be horrified

Katie Couric was a legitimate journalist before she joined Yahoo. She’d be horrified if she saw this spelling of Philando Castile on yahoo.com:

castille fp

We will emphasize with emphasis

We (meaning me and my keyboard) will emphasize that this Yahoo! Sports writer has confused a noun (like emphasis) with a verb (like emphasize):

we will emphasis mlb

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,153 other followers

%d bloggers like this: