Thanks for the clothes!

Thanks to Yahoo! Style I am now the proud owner of the “fashion trends to know for fall 2017.” Some generous person just bought them for me!

That’s an excellent example of why you can’t rely solely on a spell-checker to do your proofreading.

What makes this different from correct

If I could, I’d ask the Yahoo! Style writer if she knows what makes this wording different from, say, the correct wording:

The American Heritage Dictionary covers the use of different than and different from. Here’s the part that’s relevant, though you may want to read the full discussion:

Traditionally, from is used when the comparison is between two persons or things: My book is different from [not than] yours. Note that noun phrases, including ones that have clauses in them, also fall into this category: The campus is different from the way it was the last time you were here.

Illiterate in two languages

When the editors at Yahoo! Style aren’t mangling the English language, they’re destroying French, or now-English phrases derived from French. Like this:

I can only assume the editors meant prêt-à-porter, which means “ready-to-wear,” and is a widely understood term in fashion. Except at Yahoo!.

Big Bird, Cookie Monster, and manmade errors

Maybe the writer for Yahoo! Style is dealing with a funky keyboard with an occasionally inoperable Shift key and a space bar that’s kinda jacked:

Just in case the writer actually made these mistakes intentionally, let’s school her: Big Bird and Cookie Monster are Muppets deserving of being treated as proper nouns. And manmade is one word according to the American Heritage Dictionary, though it allows the hyphenated man-made.

You have no idea what to do with it, do you?

The Yahoo! Beauty writer responsible for this has no idea when to use an apostrophe:

Here’s a hint, don’t use it in a plural noun and put it in a possessive noun. Now ask a colleague to explain what a noun is.

Everyday error appears every day

It’s a common, ordinary, everyday-type of error that appears nearly every day on Yahoo! Style:

It’s seems that the editors just can’t remember that as one word, everyday means “common, ordinary”; as two words it means “each and every day.”

A screaming cape, a ladylike error, and sometimes grey

It’s probably not ladylike to point out writing errors by professional writers, but I’ve never been mistaken for a lady. When I saw three errors in a single sentence on Yahoo! Style, I knew I had to say something:

What did the writer think “a lady like pink” means? That there’s a lady who likes pink? Uh, no. She meant “a ladylike pink.” That’s something completely different. Also different is the spelling of grey. Although it’s not technically wrong, some U.S. authorities consider it a chiefly British spelling, and all suggest that gray is the preferred spelling.

That sound you hear is me screaming: Seeing mistakes like that makes me literally scream. But can a cape literally scream? No, but it can figuratively scream.

Do you mean Christmas songs?

Something’s amiss over at Yahoo! Style, and I’m pretty sure it has to do with a misspelling:

Did the writer mean carols? Or maybe carrots? I just don’t know. Think I’ll head to the library, grab a dictionary and settle into a carrel. Maybe I’ll find the answer there.

She’s still not a princess

Let’s skip right over that misspelling of a cappella on Yahoo! Style and focus on the misspelling of Charlotte Casiraghi’s name:

And then let’s focus on the assertion that she is an “actual Princess of Monaco.” No, even if the writer had managed to get her name right, she’d be wrong about that royal title. Charlotte Casiraghi may be eighth in line to the throne of Monaco, but she is not a princess; in fact, she has no royal title. None.

Alter that word

The writer for Yahoo! Style altered the meaning of this sentence when she used alter instead of altar:

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