Not a good place for that

The front page of Yahoo! — yahoo.com — is allegedly one of the most visited pages in the world. So, you’d think the editors would be extra careful to avoid misspellings and typos. This is one of those:

The man is Nelsan Ellis and this is not a good time or place to misspell his name.

Try romancing a dictionary

This Yahoo! Style writer won’t be making headlines for her knowledge of English:

Her rumored romance with a dictionary is hoax. Perhaps her editor can enlighten her on the correct preposition to use in this situation.

Not a good place for this

Misspelling Dwyane Wade’s name on your home page? Not a good move, Yahoo! Style.

Close enough

Don’t expect these folks to do actual research. A simple Google search is too much of a bother for the writers and editors at Yahoo! Celebrity. They’re happy letting us know that Taylor Swift’s estate is “near Rhode Island”:

So, it might be in Massachusetts or Connecticut or even Narragansett Bay. Real journalists would take the time to learn that Watch Hill, the location of Ms. Swift’s mansion, is in Rhode Island. I’d say that’s pretty “near.”

Happy Fourth of July!

It’s Independence Day here in the U.S. That’s a day also referred to as the Fourth of July, except at Yahoo! Style where the national holiday gets no respect:

In case you think that’s a careless typo, here it is again:

 

To whom it may concern

I wonder if Yahoo! Style has editors and writers who have shared information about the difference between nominative and objective pronouns. I think not:

The nominative pronoun who can be the subject of a verb like, oh, say, maybe have shared. The objective pronoun whom can be the object of a verb or preposition, like “to whom it may concern” and “For Whom the Bell Tolls.”

Racking my brain

I’m racking my brain trying to figure out how this Yahoo! Style writer could use raked up in this context:

The phrasal verb rake up means uncover. The expression the writer meant was raked in or racked up.

A full-blown editing crisis

At a legitimate publication, this would spawn a full-blown editing crisis. At Yahoo! Style, it’s just another misused word:

Apparently the editor didn’t know that crises isn’t singular; it’s the plural of crisis.

Bask in this!

I hopin’ one of my loyal readers can explain this sentence from Yahoo! Style:

Can you be “hugging onto” a person or simply hugging them? Or hanging onto them? What does that mean?

While you’re at it, maybe you can explain how one basks in firework beauty. Are you warmed by a single pyrotechnic device? Or are you enjoying fireworks, which is an actual display of the devices common on the Fourth of July.

Neither or nor have is correct

From Yahoo! Celebrity, two gaffes for the price of one:

Neither or nor the verb have responded is correct. The partner of neither is nor, not or. And when a compound subject is joined by the correlative conjunction neither…nor, the verb must agree with the subject closer to it. So, the verb should be has responded.

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