Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen aka The Ashleys

Ouch! That’s one nasty misspelling of slouch on Yahoo! DIY, followed by one hilarious misidentification of Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen as “The Ashleys.”

sloouch style

What will those wacky DIY writers dream up next? Maybe Tia and Tamera Mowry will become “The Tias.” I think that’s “aunts” in Spanish, so that might actually work.

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They never cease to fail

When in comes to quality writing, the scribes at Yahoo! DIY never cease to fail:

never ceases to fail

Why would anyone make cotton candy that is guaranteed to be a failure at wowing guests? What better way to show your carelessness than adding an unnecessary word to a common idiom or confusing then with than?

When it comes to writing errors, these folks never cease to amaze.

Need a recipe for cookies that no one will eat?

If you’re looking for a cookie that your guests will not want to eat, then head on over to Yahoo! DIY:

one can deny diy

Nobody can deny that a cookie that one can deny is kind of a dumb idea.

What was he tried for the first time?

An art teacher from Ohio took time after his retrial (for an undisclosed crime) to help decorate the White House for Christmas:

retried diy

When I see statements like that on Yahoo! DIY, I wonder if the site’s editors have all retired.

You just can’t teach it

Some people have had success teaching grammar, spelling, and other subjects related to written communication. I’ve been one of those people. But there’s one area of writing that I’ve failed at. I have never been able to teach someone logic. If their writing is illogical, their thinking is, too. And I can’t correct it.

I thought of that when I read this paragraph on Yahoo! DIY:

to upkeep

There’s just so much wrong here. The writer separates chemotherapy and cancer treatments, although we all know that chemotherapy is a cancer treatment. Perhaps she just forgot to include the word other: Undergoing chemotherapy and other cancer treatments would be correct here.

There’s just no way explain the use of the noun upkeep as a verb. It’s not a verb; to keep up would work, though.

I’m not sure why she had to specify an apartment (which is someone’s home) and home (did she perhaps mean house?) as if one wasn’t an example of the other.

Finally, that last sentence makes no sense. If I understand what she wrote, the mom was able to afford a cleaner, therefore it was possible to summon the energy to do it herself. Huh? Again, this is just a lapse in logic. I’m guessin’ the poor writer meant: If her mom had not been able to afford the cost of a house cleaner, the house would not be cleaned because she could not summon the energy to do it. Which is a lot of words. Better? Her mom could afford a house cleaner, which was fortunate since she didn’t have the energy to clean her own home.

Reverse that

It’s not unusual for a writer to use the possessive pronoun its when the contraction it’s is called for. So, I wasn’t surprised to see this goof on Yahoo! DIY:

its list diy

What did surprise me was that the writer uses it’s instead of the correct its:

its list diy 2

She’s really, really confused. But she can clear up this problem by writing it’s every time she thinks its is correct — and vice versa.

You must be yoking!

I’ve only seen this mistake once before, and of course it was on Yahoo!. This time it appears on Yahoo! DIY:

yolk diy

For the Yahoo! writers and editors, I’ll explain. This is a yolk:

yolk sweater

This is the yoke of a sweater:

yoke sweater

If you can’t be right, at least be consistent

That seems to be the motto of the writer for Yahoo! DIY who clings to the mistaken notion that a hangar is something you hang in your closet:

hangars diy

It is not. A hangar is something a plane hangs out in. But at least this gal is consistent:

hangars diy 2

… and maybe a bit stubborn. Here it is one more time:

hangars diy 3

The writer probably doesn’t think that spelling matters nowadays. Judging from the comments left for the article, I’d say she was wrong:

“For those who write these articles, PLEASE, check your spelling and verbiage.”

“Hanger – for clothes. Hangar – for airplanes”

“All the misused ‘hangars’ is very distracting. We’re not talking about organizing an airport hangar, we’re trying to get ideas on how to better organize our own closets. The word is h-a-n-g-e-r. with an ‘e’. Just for future reference, so those weird people like me who can’t get past incorrect spelling can focus on the content of the article instead of itching to make it right.”

What’s a cozy’s?

I don’t know what a cup cozy is, but I do know this isn’t its plural on Yahoo! DIY:

cozys apost diy

Seriously. What is wrong with the writers at DIY? They can’t seem to form a plural without an apostrophe and an S. The plural of cozy is cozies. No apostrophe.

You’re not fooling anyone

The writer over at Yahoo! DIY isn’t fooling anyone with this misspelling of trompe l’œil:

tromp diy

Trompe l’œil, which means “fool the eye” in French,l is a style of painting.

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