Do you mean Christmas songs?

Something’s amiss over at Yahoo! Style, and I’m pretty sure it has to do with a misspelling:

Did the writer mean carols? Or maybe carrots? I just don’t know. Think I’ll head to the library, grab a dictionary and settle into a carrel. Maybe I’ll find the answer there.

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She’s still not a princess

Let’s skip right over that misspelling of a cappella on Yahoo! Style and focus on the misspelling of Charlotte Casiraghi’s name:

And then let’s focus on the assertion that she is an “actual Princess of Monaco.” No, even if the writer had managed to get her name right, she’d be wrong about that royal title. Charlotte Casiraghi may be eighth in line to the throne of Monaco, but she is not a princess; in fact, she has no royal title. None.

Foxy stars of ‘Teen Wolf’

Don’t you love it when a writer tries to use an unusual or fancy-pants word and gets it wrong? Me, too. I just love the use of vulpine in this article on Yahoo! Style about “Teen Wolf” stars:

vulpine-sty

Vulpine refers to a fox or something resembling a fox. The word that refers to a wolf is lupine.

Kim Kardashian and deadly fame

If you’re unfamiliar with French, as this Yahoo! Style writer appears to be, perhaps you should avoid certain words and phrases, like femme fatale:

fame-fatale-sty

Pardon my French

It looks as if this Yahoo! Style writer knows a little French and not much more English. If this were an actual English word, it would probably be pronounced cash-ay. If it were a real English word, it would be spelled cachet.

cache-acc-sty

How to lose all credibility

If you’re a writer and your beat is fashion, shouldn’t you know how to spell the name of luxury brand Bottega Veneta? Not if you work for Yahoo! Style:

bottega-venetta-sty-hp

If you think that’s a typo, you would be wrong. In the article, after misspelling model Raquel Zimmermann’s name, she mangles Bottega Veneta:

bottega-venetta-sty

So, how much credibility does the writer — and Yahoo! Style —  have?

Destroying another language

Not content to commit a felony on the English and French languages, Yahoo! Style writers are now assaulting Italian:

spetaccolore sty

If you’re trying to be clever by using a word in a foreign language and you misspell it, you look like a spettacolare idiot.

Not discreetly placed

This hyphen from Yahoo! Style is not discreetly placed; it’s as clear as day:

discretely-placed sty

If you care about writing that is scrupulously correct, you wouldn’t put a hyphen between an adverb ending in -LY and the word that follows it. If you care about being understood and not looking like an undereducated dilettante, you’d use discreet when you’re referring to something that was designed to attract little attention.

Oh, baby, this is really sad

Waa-waa. These embarrassing goofs on Yahoo! Style make me cry.

bambini babys sty

Ms. Missoni is pregnant with baby number two, meaning she’s having one baby, which is a bambino. The word bambino, which is now considered informal English, is singular; bambini (or bambinos) is the plural.

So this genius of a writer uses a plural when she needs a singular and then uses a possessive when she needs a plural. I know I don’t have to tell you this, but I will anyway: The plural of baby is babies. Anything else is just the result of gross ignorance.

That’s unbelievable!

Here are two reasons I’d never believe anything I read on Yahoo! Travel. The first is something every American should know:

ellis island beauty

The Statue of Liberty never struck a pose on Ellis Island. She first appeared on Bedloe’s Island, which was later renamed Liberty Island, where she remains.

That normally would be enough for me to threaten to poke out my eyes with a number 2 pencil. But, I continued reading the article, which is purportedly about American models of the past. So, how did the writer screw up Peggy Moffitt’s name so badly — every freakin’ time she mentioned her?

name moffatt beauty

Here’s what I think: The writer is so damned sure of her superior knowledge that she didn’t bother to look up any facts. And without an editor to do a little fact-checking, you get an article like this.

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