To kick off this post

To kick off this blog post about Yahoo! Style, I’m excited to share that neither the writer nor the editor knows the difference between a noun (like kickoff) and a phrasal verb (like kick off):

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Bask in this!

I hopin’ one of my loyal readers can explain this sentence from Yahoo! Style:

Can you be “hugging onto” a person or simply hugging them? Or hanging onto them? What does that mean?

While you’re at it, maybe you can explain how one basks in firework beauty. Are you warmed by a single pyrotechnic device? Or are you enjoying fireworks, which is an actual display of the devices common on the Fourth of July.

Where do you keep your clothes?

While most people keep their clothes in a closet and maybe a dresser, this Yahoo! Style has wardrobe stables:

I think that means she hangs her dresses in a horse stall. Or it could just be proof that a dictionary should be a staple for every writer.

I’m not mathematical genius

I’m no mathematical genius, in fact, I’m barely competent in basic arithmetic. But I’m pretty sure that this claim on Yahoo! Style is off by at least 100 years:

Levi’s the company has been around since 1853, which is somewhat more than 50 years ago. I think. But I’m no mathematical genius, so I could be wrong.

Know nothing about fashion?

Proving once again that you don’t need to know anything about fashion to land a job at Yahoo! Style, this writer claims to have spotted a paisley print:

Here’s what the writer calls “paisley,” but the retailer calls “floral stripes”:

That seems to be a lot (I mean A LOT) closer to the truth, since a paisley print involves amoeba-like figures like this:

A blend of old and new

Here’s a blend of old and new on Yahoo! Style:

Using the wrong word is an old error on Yahoo!, but using the expression blend between instead of blend of is a new error.

What makes this different from correct

If I could, I’d ask the Yahoo! Style writer if she knows what makes this wording different from, say, the correct wording:

The American Heritage Dictionary covers the use of different than and different from. Here’s the part that’s relevant, though you may want to read the full discussion:

Traditionally, from is used when the comparison is between two persons or things: My book is different from [not than] yours. Note that noun phrases, including ones that have clauses in them, also fall into this category: The campus is different from the way it was the last time you were here.

Something smells a little ripe

Yahoo! Style is rife with grammatical gaffes, terrible typos, and massive misspellings. But of all the mistakes I find on on the site, my favorite is the incorrect word:

ripe-with

You’re so vain, you probably think this blog is about you

Ever wonder if the Yahoo! Style writers think this blog is all about them? Well, it practically is, since they make so many errors they seemed to be featured every day. In the same vein, there are lots more errors in other Yahoo! sites, but the ones on Style are the easiest to find, like this one:

in-the-same-vain-sty

Does this strike a chord?

This strikes a chord with me, and not in a good way. It’s an example from Yahoo! Style of a writer confusing a group of three notes (which is a chord) and  a string or rope (called a cord):

chords-sty

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