Bored with grammar

Apparently writers at Yahoo! Shine are bored with using correct English, correct spelling, and correct punctuation:

burts bees

If you think “are bored of ” sounds right to you, you should read what the American Heritage Dictionary says:

If an activity or experience starts to bore you, are you bored by it, bored of it, or bored with it? All three constructions are common in informal writing and speech, but they enjoy different degrees of acceptance. … In our 2012 survey, the sentences I’m getting bored with this lecture series and I’m getting bored by this lecture series were accepted by 93 percent and 88 percent of our Usage Panel, respectively. By contrast, only 24 percent of the Panelists found I’m getting bored of this lecture series at least somewhat acceptable.

In an article about Burt’s Bees, this writer can’t even spell the brand. This so-called professional also thinks it’s okie-dokie to use quotation marks after so-called. It’s not.

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What’s still going on at Yahoo?

Yesterday I did something I seldom do; I published a blog post with multiple boo-boos from the Yahoo! front page. Usually I just cover one, but the errors on yahoo.com were so numerous, that I lumped them all in a single post.

Did I just write “all”? That’s not quite accurate, because after that post went live, the hits misses just kept on comin’. Like this attempt at trying to spell Sprinkler:

fp sprinker

And this pathetic try at Steve Carell’s name:

fp steve carrell

This looks to be an attempt at saying “Johnny Manziel owes his appeal to” or “Johnny Manziel’s appeal is due to”:

fp appeal owes to

Oh, lordie. This so-called headline contains redundant quotation marks. Don’t use quotation marks if you’re using so-called because they mean the same thing:

fp so-called costco

I’m no chemist (in fact, chemistry was my weakest subject in college), but I know something about logic. Here’s the scoop: If everything in the world is made up of chemicals, you really don’t need to tell us that “not all are toxic” because it’s unlikely there would still be a human being alive if everything were toxic:

fp chemicals

Written by a so-called professional?

Even so-called professional writers make grammatical, punctuation, and spelling mistakes — especially if they work for Yahoo!. Take this example from Yahoo! News‘ “The Sideshow,” where the writer believes that quotation marks belong after the expression “so-called”:

ped 1

They don’t. According to the American Heritage Dictionary, “Quotation marks are not used to set off descriptions that follow expressions such as so-called and self-styled, which themselves relieve the writer of responsibility for the attribution: his so-called foolproof method (not ‘foolproof method’).

That’s a common mistake. On Yahoo!, there are a lot of common mistakes, like failing to match a pronoun with its antecedent (the word it refers to). And failing to hyphenate modern-day when it’s used as an adjective, misspelling Flintstones, and best of all using peddles instead of pedals:

ped 2

This is more akin to a careless error:

ped 3

And any decent spell-checker would have flagged Minnealpolis as a misspelling:

ped 4

But for Yahoo!’s so-called journalists, spell-checking is optional. Heck, it’s not just optional, it’s nonexistent.

Just to be sure we understand that Jeff Stone is a Republican state representative, the writer tells us in two slightly different ways, each containing its own errors:

ped 5

If you think I’m the only person who is appalled by this professional writer’s ignorance, you’d be wrong. Here’s one comment left by a reader:

“using peddles underneath their seats”
“PEDDLES”???? Jeezuz Joe Bob. My 6-year-old can write better than this. Apparently they’re trying to solve the unemployment problem by giving illiterate idiots jobs writing “news” articles. Sheesh.

Even millennials would know better

Misspellings, typos, missing punctuation. It’s all in a day’s work for the reporter for Yahoo! News‘ “The Ticket.” The fun starts with a so-called punctuation goof coupled with a misspelling:

 

If you’re using the term so-called, don’t include quotation marks around the so-called object. As for what could be a typo, it’s anyone’s guess: Was it one four-year college or several four-year colleges? The writer’s typo leaves us wondering.

So, it’s pretty clear that the writer doesn’t know how to spell millennials:

There’s a hyphen missing here:

It should be 18- to 29-year-olds. I think even millennials would know that. Unless they write for Yahoo!, in which case they don’t know and don’t care.

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