Do I repeat myself? repeat myself?

From yahoo.com, more evidence that everyone needs to proofread:

At least error 1 on yahoo.com

There’s at least one error on yahoo.com, one of the world’s most visited websites:

Forth what it’s Worth . . .

This is probably a common typo involving the Texas city of Fort Worth. But the fact that it appears on one of the most visited pages on the Internet — yahoo.com — makes it a real embarrassment:

Says who?

This is a common grammatical mistake on yahoo.com, says blogger:

One of two words is wrong in that teaser, but which one? The hapless reader doesn’t know if one official or multiple official made a statement. Sad.

It’s not everyday

It’s not every day you see something like this on yahoo.com — it only seems that way:

If it’s a commonplace, ordinary, everyday occurrence, it might happen every day.

That’s a new one

I’ve seen all kinds of misuse of the apostrophe, but this one on yahoo.com take’s the cake:

I have nothing further to say

This appeared today on yahoo.com and nothing could be further from accurate than this use of farther:

Confused about the difference between further and farther? Here’s what the American Heritage Dictionary says:

Since the Middle English period many writers have used farther and further interchangeably. According to a relatively recent rule, however, farther should be reserved for physical distance and further for nonphysical, metaphorical advancement. Thus 74 percent of the Usage Panel prefers farther in the sentence If you are planning to drive any farther than Ukiah, you’d better carry chains, and 64 percent prefers further in the sentence We won’t be able to answer these questions until we are further along in our research.

Not a good place for that

The front page of Yahoo! — yahoo.com — is allegedly one of the most visited pages in the world. So, you’d think the editors would be extra careful to avoid misspellings and typos. This is one of those:

The man is Nelsan Ellis and this is not a good time or place to misspell his name.

Great proofreading job!

What are the odds that someone at yahoo.com proofread this headline? Zero.

If you can’t be right…

If you can’t be right, at least be consistent. That’s advice that the folks at yahoo.com could use:

It looks like they couldn’t agree on how to abbreviate United Kingdom. Legitimate news outlets use a little something called a style (or editorial) guide so they avoid embarrassments like this.

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