Not done with Lea Michele

Yesterday we learned that the folks at Yahoo! Style have trouble spelling Lea Michele’s name. You might think the misspelling was a mere typo, but you would be wrong. In the article about Ms. Michele, the writer gets her name wrong twice in the opening paragraph:

lea-1

Not content to abuse Ms. Michele’s name, the writer took a sledgehammer to the English language with has sang (does anyone think that’s correct?), followed by a misplaced apostrophe in what should be Kohl’s, followed by a bit of nonsense that I think should be get to see which workout kicked and the ridiculous ideal of a perfect night (which I think is supposed to be idea of a perfect night).

The rest of the article doesn’t get any better. It contains more misspellings, more misplaced and missing punctuation, and a whole lot of unintelligible word salad. I’ve seen better writing in a high school newspaper. Maybe I should stick to reading that.

A series of mistakes

The series of mistake in Yahoo! News leaves me dumbfounded:

series-leave-new

The word series is both singular and plural. If you’re referring to a single series, it’s singular and takes a singular verb like leaves.

Editor shows us exactly how not to write a headline

Here’s a tip for Yahoo! Style editors: Although New Orleans ends in an S, it is not plural, it is singular. And this is wrong:

new-orleans-show-sty-hp

I hate the verbification of nouns

Am I the only one who thinks that an editor who uses a noun as a verb is guilty of an inability to think of an appropriate word?

tributed-tv-hp

The genius editors at Yahoo! TV couldn’t come up with remembered, lauded, honored, extolled, admired, celebrated, or adored. So they made tribute, which is strictly a noun, a verb.

His influence is not to be overlooked

According to a certain Yahoo! Style writer, George Michael’s influence on fashion and style are not to be overlooked:

in-his-staid-sty

Apparently to the writer (and her editor), though, think it’s OK to overlook grammar — like matching a subject (say, influence) with a correct verb (let’s just say it ain’t are). In its stead, the writer should have used is. And in staid‘s stead, she should have used stead.

All good things come to an end

All good things come to an end, and in this excerpt from Yahoo! Style that end starts with the fourth word:

of-our-dream-sty

Why couldn’t the writer match the verb to the subject? Probably for the same reason she thought “our dream” was a substitute for “our dreams.”

Fashion not your passion?

If fashion isn’t your passion, maybe you shouldn’t be writing for Yahoo! Style. Or maybe it just doesn’t matter that you don’t know the real name of designer Nicolas Ghesquière:

nicholas-ghesquire-sty

So, you don’t care to spell his name correctly. No biggy. You might want to focus on grammar and using the correct tense instead. Or not.

Number of errors has skyrocketed

The number of grammatical errors on Yahoo! Style hasn’t really skyrocketed. It’s just held steady at a number that is far too large for a professionally written site. Here’s just one more example:

searches-has-sty

I can’t explain how a mistake like that gets made. Maybe the writer thought the subject of the verb was accessory, and not searches. Yeah, I’m going with that.

Writer and editor has a problem

This Yahoo! Celebrity writer and his/her editor have a problem with grammar — specifically, matching a verb to its subject:

has-cel

Yahoo clinches worst headline of the day

Yahoo! Sports clinches the title for worst headline of the day with this mismatch of a singular subject and a plural verb:

clinch-spo-hp

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