Not a New York-born writer?

I’m imagining a Yahoo! Style editor saying to this writer, “You need to put a hyphen in ‘New York born’ because it’s a compound adjective.” And the writer saying “OK, will do!” And this is what happened:

new-york-born-sty

There’s that hyphen! It’s just in the wrong place. There’s no need to hyphenate New York (that’s just wrong); the hyphen belongs after New York.

Hyper hyphenation

Somebody over at yahoo.com must love hyphens enough to throw them around like rice at a wedding:

fp-world-series-starved

It’s a well-known rule that a hyphen can join two words to form a compound modifier before a noun. But if one of those words is actually a name or other proper noun, don’t stuff a hyphen in it. So, the following are all correct: a World Series-starved team, a Donald Trump-inspired wig, a Hillary Clinton-signed book.

The only publicly misused punctuation

OK, so I lied. There is no single punctuation character that is publicly misused. Every punctuation character is misused in public, especially on Yahoo!. This time the punctuation is a hyphen and the site is Yahoo! Finance:

publicly-traded-fin

The rule: Don’t put a hyphen between an adverb ending in -LY and the word it modifies.

When did that happen?

When did 14-year-olds become preteens? Oh, when they were born and stayed preteens up until the day before their 13th birthday — at least according to everyone who isn’t a writer for Yahoo! Style:

preteen sty

I know that Yahoo! writers and editors are not good with numbers. They confuse millions and billions, think that digits and letters are the same thing,  and just don’t get percentages. But you’d think they’d know that fourteen isn’t a preteen because teen is part of the word.

In-house editor needed

If ever there was a site that needed a competent in-house editor, it’s Yahoo! Style. Someone who knows that in-house needs a hyphen would be a start:

pedigree style

Someone who knows that “designed in house from a pedigree of experienced industry personnel” makes absolutely no sense could be helpful. It would be great if that person knew to shorten that to “designed in-house by experienced industry personnel.” Someone who knew that “boasts their apparel to be” also is nonsense and should be something like “boasts their apparel is.” An in-house editor would be great. Heck, even an outhouse editor could be great.

Who stitched this together?

Whoever stitched together this sentence for Yahoo! Sports did a pretty good job, if you ignore the misspelling and the missing hyphen in the compound adjective gruesome-looking:

stiches spo

A pitcher with only one hat

I’ve read that some baseball players would like to see a Home Run Derby that was for pitchers only. It’d be a pitchers-only derby. It would not be the pitcher’s only derby that Yahoo! Sports alleges:

pitchers only

Were they really eels?

Dory, the character from “Finding Nemo” and “Finding Dory” apparently comes from a family of long fish, according to the editors at yahoo.com:

fp long lost

Was the “long, lost family” made up of eels? I guess it could be worse for Dory: She could have a long-lost family.

Fifty-two pickup

This excerpt from Yahoo! Sports would be perfect if fifty-two could just pick up a hyphen:

fifty two spo

All two-part numbers (from twenty-one to ninety-nine) require a hyphen.

Uniquely unprepared to edit

The editors at the Yahoo! front page seem uniquely unqualified to perform their jobs. They just can’t remember that there’s no hyphen between an adverb ending in -LY (like, oh, say, maybe uniquely) and the word that follows it:

fp uniquely-shaped

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