Is that correct? Not by a long shot

Is this idiom used correctly on Yahoo! Style? Not by a long shot. And by that I mean, “NO!” Jeez, doesn’t the writer know that a long shot is a horse, person, or occurrence that has little or no chance of succeeding?

long shot

This writer also is a long shot for succeeding at writing. If she’s not the worst writer at Yahoo!, she’s at least a runner-up.

Reader’s no-holds-barred reaction

Here’s my no-holds-barred reaction to this teaser on Yahoo! Celebrity: It sucks.

no-holds cel

It sucks, but it doesn’t suck as hard as this writer’s attempt at the common expression.

Idiom, idiot. They’re so close

Maybe the genius writer for Yahoo! Style made a little typo and was going for idiot when she wrote this:

idiom sty

Clearly she couldn’t have meant idiom because it’s not an idiom, it’s a saying, an adage, an old saw.

Now here’s an idiom (or it would be an idiom if the writer had gotten it right):

up to par with sty

The expression is “on a par with,” which means equal to. Or maybe it’s “up to par,” which means just average.

She would have been correct with close-ups — if she had just closed it up with a hyphen.

By “scratching on a century,” I think the writer means “approaching 100.” Maybe the writer doesn’t know that a century is 100 years and that at 86, the subject has 14 years before she’ll hit that milestone. That’s like saying a newborn is nearly a teenager or a 50-year-old is “scratching” on retirement.

Idiom, idiot. So close in spelling. And so close to being the correct word.

In love with hyphens?

Has the writer for the Yahoo! front page just discovered the Hyphen key on a keyboard, and decided to use it — once too often?

fp hy

The hyphen after Jenner is correct. (Good job!) But there shouldn’t be a hyphen in the name because there’s no chance of a misunderstanding. Unless you’re writing about Olivia Newton-John or Julia Louis-Dreyfus. Then they get one hyphen each. But just one.

Where has it been?

Where the heck did it go? Where’s the hyphen that makes it a real bunch of has-beens on the Yahoo! front page?

fp has beens

If you don;t like this…

If you don’t like the use of a semicolon to form a contraction, you won’t like this caption from Yahoo! Makers. But it doesn’t stop there: Your eyes aren’t deceiving you, the writer (who happens to be the site’s editor in chief) doesn’t know the difference between you’re and your and she omitted the hyphen in the compound adjective store-bought:

dont like youre diy

Hall of Fame error

If there were a Hall of Fame for hyphenation errors, this one on the Yahoo! front page would qualify for induction:

fp hall-of-famer 2

Take a 24-hour break

If you’re responsible for this headline on Yahoo! Style, step away from the keyboard and take a break — for about 24 hours. Then take a refresher course in the use of a hyphen:

24-hours sty

Hopefully to help

Huh? How do you helpfully build out a brand? What the heck did the writer for Yahoo! Style mean? Did she mean “to hopefully build” (meaning, to build with hope in one’s heart) or “to help build” (meaning, she can’t proofread)?

helpfully sty

At least she didn’t write runner-ups, but she did neglect to include the hyphen in what should be runners-up.

When I see expressions like “a piece” I have to wonder what the writer thinks that means. A piece of what? Did she perhaps mean each, in which case she should have used the word apiece.

Nice try, but wrong

The editors at yahoo.com made a valiant attempt to use the suspensive hyphen, but the result is really kinda pathetic:

fp mid-

The duchess is due in mid-April to late April. To avoid duplicating the word April, the writer tried using the suspensive hyphen after the prefix mid. Good job! But using a hyphen to join “to-late” makes no sense. But it’s too late to unsee that mistake. This should have been “mid- to late April.”

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