How many daughters are the Obamas hiding?

President and Mrs. Obama admit to having two daughters, Malia and Sasha. Is there a third daughter hidden away in the White House attic? That’s what I’m wondering after reading this on yahoo.com:

fp-youngest

If the president has only two daughters, then Sasha would be the younger of the two. But the word youngest implies he has at least three. Where is the third? And why is he hiding her? This is how rumors (and hoaxes) get started…

Not a real reporter?

Are the folks who write for yahoo.com real reporters or former journalists? Looking at this, I’d say no:

fp-undercovered

Mistakes like that are underreported in blogs about writing and grammar. That’s why I’m here: To let folks know that undercovered is not a word. The word is underreported. I’d think that a real journalist would know that.

What was the character’s real name?

And you thought that William Christopher’s character on M*A*S*H was Father Mulcahy? That really was not the character’s name, according to the Einsteins at yahoo.com:

fp-father-mulcahy

Why did the editors think that the name required quotation marks except to indicate it was the character’s so-called name? I guess if they were writing about characters in a Shakespearean play they’d refer to “Romeo” and “Juliet.” And they’d be wrong about that, too.

Don’t add to Kanye’s stress

As if Kanye West wasn’t stressed enough, this headline on yahoo.com might just send him around the bend. Again.

fp-kayne

Is that your question?

“Based on a true story?” That’s the question that yahoo.com asks:

fp-ques-quot

Of course, that makes no sense, because the entire headline is actually the question. For some reason the editor made a common mistake (at least it’s common on Yahoo!) by placing the question mark before the closing quotation mark. In the U.S., a comma and period go before a closing quotation mark; a semicolon and colon go after. If you’re looking to place a question mark, put it before the closing quote only if the entire text inside the quotation marks is a question. Otherwise, it goes after the closing quote mark.

Trick to write headline in record time

Here’s a trick to help you write a headline in record time: Ignore English and common idioms. Just do as the folks at yahoo.com and write anything, even if it makes no sense:

trick

You can cook a turkey in record time, or at record speed, but not in record speed because that makes no freakin’ sense.

This is not surprising

Is it a typo? Is it a misspelling? Whichever it is, it’s not surprising to find it on yahoo.com:

fp-suprising

Prime minister heartbreaker

Is that a heartbreaking prime minister on “Walking Dead” or did the editors at yahoo.com confuse premier (which is a prime minister) with the word that means “first public performance,” or premiere?

fp-premier

Yeah, you’re right; it’s the latter.

Someone violated the language

Someone violated English on yahoo.com with this nasty spelling:

fp-vileted

Hyper hyphenation

Somebody over at yahoo.com must love hyphens enough to throw them around like rice at a wedding:

fp-world-series-starved

It’s a well-known rule that a hyphen can join two words to form a compound modifier before a noun. But if one of those words is actually a name or other proper noun, don’t stuff a hyphen in it. So, the following are all correct: a World Series-starved team, a Donald Trump-inspired wig, a Hillary Clinton-signed book.

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