Readers put through the wringer

Readers of have been put through the wringer trying to decipher this expression:


A wringer is the part of an old-timey washing machine that squeezed the water out of laundry:


It doesn’t take a vivid imagination to visualize being put through a wringer. I have no idea what the writer thought “through the ringer” could possibly mean.

Editors humiliate themselves

The editor or editors behind this headline on should be humiliated for writing this:


A woman can be humiliated, but a woman’s looks? Not so much.

It was bound to happen

When it became acceptable (at least in some circles) to use the pronouns they, their, and them to refer to an individual of unknown gender, it was bound to happen: Those same plural pronouns would be used when a singular pronoun is required. It happened on


The pronoun their refers to one of two candidates, both of whom are purported to be male. The correct pronoun is the singular his.

‘Crazy punctuation’: Who wrote that?

Somebody at probably misunderstood a punctuation rule when it comes to quotation marks:


In the U.S., commas and periods go before a closing quotation mark. (In other English-speaking countries, they go after the quotation mark.) But, regardless of country, two punctuation marks never go before a closing quotation mark: Colons and semicolons.

What month would you select?

What month would you select in the Dylann Roof trial? According to, a July selection begins in the trial.


But what is the selection for? Personally, I’d prefer to see a jury selection start now for Mr. Roof’s trial.

Can you spot it?

Can you spot the misspelling from


The white dog with the spots is a Dalmatian. The breed is named after Dalmatia, an area on the Adriatic Sea.

Oh no she didn’t

Despite what you might read on, the model in question did not tip over during a fashion show:


As the article and videos attest, she was wobbly, but never fell. This just illustrates — again — the importance of hiring writers who can actually read and who are familiar with common English verbs.

It’s not a rare occurrence

A misspelled word is not a rare occurrence on


Not a high school graduate?

Doesn’t every high school graduate know that the pronoun who refers to human beings? Apparently not. There must be colleges that accept applicants who don’t know that and at least one editor at who’s unaware of the rule:

fp colleges who

Is Yahoo anti-Republican?

Is this a political statement from the editors at Are they so anti-Republican that they won’t even recognize the party as a proper noun?

fp republican lc

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