Maybe it really is fake news

I’m not one to holler “fake news” when I see something obviously wrong online. I’m more likely to holler “Yahoo!” Yup, the internet giant makes mistakes on its pages — mistakes that are completely avoidable by a little bit of reading by its editors. Take this teaser on Yahoo News:

I can’t understand how that mistake was made. For the last month we’ve heard and read about the 17 deaths in Florida. And anyone who has been paying attention knows that 14 students and 3 staff members were victims of that tragedy. Why don’t the Yahoo editors know that?

Maybe they just don’t like to read. Maybe they prefer to exercise their imagination. Like they did on with this falsehood:

The pedestrian bridge that collapsed has not been open for a few days. Not even for one day. The bridge has not been opened at all. Period! (as Sean Spicer would say).

I had hope that the editors corrected the error when I noticed they updated the headline, but noooooo:

The editors still insist that the bridge opened days ago. With hope springing once more, I was sure they’d corrected the error when they updated the headline yet again:

And yet again, the alternative fact is still there. Maybe I have to reconsider my avoidance of calling obvious errors fake news.


How is your state of nind?

If you think readers don’t care about typos, think again. Here’s a little typo (in a headline, no less!) from

Did readers notice? Of course they did. And they had something to say about the error:

  • His nind is fine. His mind, not so much.
  • What exactly is “Nind”? perhaps its the author that is not doing well….
  • However, Wilbur’s ”Nind” is in question now.
  • Trump is in a constant New York state of nind.
  • State of nind?
  • Trump’s “state of nind”? yahoo has surely lost its own.
  • A nind is a terrible thing to waste.
  • why not do a spell check yahoo
  • I can see typo or spelling/grammatical errors getting thru the proofing process when it’s part of the article’s text. That’s impossible to always avoid. The headlines should never have one though. That’s embarrassing.
And my personal favorite:
  • I do worry about the “State of Nind” of the proofreaders at yahoo. Perhaps they should have their Covfefes examined.


Is this a Brendan Fraser conspiracy?

When I read this on, I thought the missing word may have been a careless error:

But now I’m not so sure. There may be a conspiracy over at the Internet giant to ruin the actor’s career. Why else would the editors run another story about the star of “The Mummy”?

The actor who may have been blacklisted and who may have been sexually assaulted is Brendan Fraser.

And then I fell aslee

Did the editors at suffer from an attack of narcolepsy before they could finish this sentence?


Would not be first time

This would not be the first time a word has gone missing on

Ya’ll laugh

Y’all take a look at this headline; y’all be embarrassed for the editor:

The Southern express y’all is a colloquial contraction of you and all. The misplaced apostrophe in ya’ll makes that a contraction of ya (or you) and will. Y’all got that?

A lost win

I know virtually nothing about American football, but I do know that this tidbit on is wrong:

Philadelphia isn’t looking for its first Super Bowl. It’s looking for its first Super Bowl win. That’s kinda different.

Do I repeat myself? repeat myself?

From, more evidence that everyone needs to proofread:

At least error 1 on

There’s at least one error on, one of the world’s most visited websites:

Forth what it’s Worth . . .

This is probably a common typo involving the Texas city of Fort Worth. But the fact that it appears on one of the most visited pages on the Internet — — makes it a real embarrassment:

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