I have nothing further to say

This appeared today on yahoo.com and nothing could be further from accurate than this use of farther:

Confused about the difference between further and farther? Here’s what the American Heritage Dictionary says:

Since the Middle English period many writers have used farther and further interchangeably. According to a relatively recent rule, however, farther should be reserved for physical distance and further for nonphysical, metaphorical advancement. Thus 74 percent of the Usage Panel prefers farther in the sentence If you are planning to drive any farther than Ukiah, you’d better carry chains, and 64 percent prefers further in the sentence We won’t be able to answer these questions until we are further along in our research.

Not a good place for that

The front page of Yahoo! — yahoo.com — is allegedly one of the most visited pages in the world. So, you’d think the editors would be extra careful to avoid misspellings and typos. This is one of those:

The man is Nelsan Ellis and this is not a good time or place to misspell his name.

Great proofreading job!

What are the odds that someone at yahoo.com proofread this headline? Zero.

If you can’t be right…

If you can’t be right, at least be consistent. That’s advice that the folks at yahoo.com could use:

It looks like they couldn’t agree on how to abbreviate United Kingdom. Legitimate news outlets use a little something called a style (or editorial) guide so they avoid embarrassments like this.

Tousling the language

Proving once again that knowledge of English isn’t a requirement for a job writing for yahoo.com, the Internet giant unleashes this assault on readers:

Mr. Fallon didn’t tussle anyone’s hair; that would involve a vigorous struggle or scuffle. What he did was tousle the then-candidate’s hair. He messed it up, similar to what Yahoo!’s editors are doing with the language.

Find a lucrative career

Here’s some unsolicited advice to the editors of yahoo.com: Find a lucrative career that doesn’t depend on knowledge of English:

The adjective lucrative doesn’t mean substantial or significant. It means profitable.

The real Twitter problem

When an Internet giant makes a mistake in a headline on its front page, it’s impossible to ignore:

The real problem is the misuse of a trademark. When referring to the social network, Twitter is a trademark deserving a capital letter.

Take off ‘of’ in ‘off of’

Spotted yesterday on yahoo.com:

What’s the issue? It’s the use of off of, which some think is wrong and others say merely lacks concision.

The American Heritage Dictionary says:

The compound preposition off of is generally regarded as informal and is best avoided in formal speech and writing: He stepped off (not off of) the platform.

While Merriam Webster states:

The of is often criticized as superfluous, a comment that is irrelevant because off of is an idiom. It is much more common in speech than in edited writing and is more common in American English than in British.

Aha! There’s the reason for the superfluous of! I’m reading yahoo.com, which isn’t exactly “edited writing.”

The editors at yahoo.com managed to get the hyphen in the right spot in the compound adjective guided-missile. But they couldn’t manage to do it twice:

Blogger addresses grammar

Let’s address the grammatical gaffe on yahoo.com:

What the heck were the editors thinking!?

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