Nice tries, but wrong

This writer for Yahoo! Finance seems a little confused about where to put a hyphen:

nobel prize fin

The writer’s not confused about capitalization, though — just wrong. It’s Nobel Prize, with two capital letters. Oh, that hyphen? It belongs after Nobel Prize: Nobel Prize-winner Stiglitz and Nobel Prize-winning economist.

What do you make when you slip up?

When you slip up, you make a slip-up. When you write for Yahoo! front page, chances are good that the slip-up will be seen by millions:

fp slip up

A Hall of Fame error

Do the Dallas Cowboys have a plan for Randy Gregory? Or does the team have plans? You just can’t tell because of this mismatch of subject and verb on Yahoo! Sports:

plan include spo

That’s not exactly an error for the Hall of Fame of Grammar Goofs, but hyphenating Hall of Fame is.

At least she got the color right

If you’ve been reading Terribly Write for a while, you know that the writers at Yahoo! Style are particularly challenged when it comes to issues such as grammar, punctuation, and spelling. So it’s no surprise that a writer thinks there should be a hyphen after an adverb ending in -LY and that she can’t spell anointed:

morning coat sty

When she’s not mangling the language, she’s mangling the facts. She claims Prince William wore a morning coat for his wedding. This is a morning coat:

morning

This is what Prince William actually wore:

morning coat

It is a military uniform and what we might call a jacket is referred to as a tunic. But I can see how one might confuse it with a morning coat because they both have two sleeves.

Is that correct? Not by a long shot

Is this idiom used correctly on Yahoo! Style? Not by a long shot. And by that I mean, “NO!” Jeez, doesn’t the writer know that a long shot is a horse, person, or occurrence that has little or no chance of succeeding?

long shot

This writer also is a long shot for succeeding at writing. If she’s not the worst writer at Yahoo!, she’s at least a runner-up.

Reader’s no-holds-barred reaction

Here’s my no-holds-barred reaction to this teaser on Yahoo! Celebrity: It sucks.

no-holds cel

It sucks, but it doesn’t suck as hard as this writer’s attempt at the common expression.

Idiom, idiot. They’re so close

Maybe the genius writer for Yahoo! Style made a little typo and was going for idiot when she wrote this:

idiom sty

Clearly she couldn’t have meant idiom because it’s not an idiom, it’s a saying, an adage, an old saw.

Now here’s an idiom (or it would be an idiom if the writer had gotten it right):

up to par with sty

The expression is “on a par with,” which means equal to. Or maybe it’s “up to par,” which means just average.

She would have been correct with close-ups — if she had just closed it up with a hyphen.

By “scratching on a century,” I think the writer means “approaching 100.” Maybe the writer doesn’t know that a century is 100 years and that at 86, the subject has 14 years before she’ll hit that milestone. That’s like saying a newborn is nearly a teenager or a 50-year-old is “scratching” on retirement.

Idiom, idiot. So close in spelling. And so close to being the correct word.

In love with hyphens?

Has the writer for the Yahoo! front page just discovered the Hyphen key on a keyboard, and decided to use it — once too often?

fp hy

The hyphen after Jenner is correct. (Good job!) But there shouldn’t be a hyphen in the name because there’s no chance of a misunderstanding. Unless you’re writing about Olivia Newton-John or Julia Louis-Dreyfus. Then they get one hyphen each. But just one.

Where has it been?

Where the heck did it go? Where’s the hyphen that makes it a real bunch of has-beens on the Yahoo! front page?

fp has beens

Hall of Fame error

If there were a Hall of Fame for hyphenation errors, this one on the Yahoo! front page would qualify for induction:

fp hall-of-famer 2

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