That’s not everyday glamour

That’s not everyday glamour on the Yahoo! Beauty home page. But it should be:

glamor bea

Although some dictionaries recognize glamor, the preferred spelling is glamour. According to the American Heritage Dictionary:

Many words, such as honor, vapor, and labor, are usually spelled with an -or ending in American English but with an -our ending in British English. The preferred spelling of glamour, however, is -our, making it an exception to the usual American practice. The adjective is more often spelled glamorous in both American and British usage.

Stay in school and get that diploma!

My advice to this associate editor for Yahoo! Style? Stay in school and get that high school diploma. Or take some GED classes that include basic English vocabulary. Then, you might not make this embarrassing mistake:

matriculation ceremony

That’s from an article about a student graduating from high school, not entering a college or university, which is what matriculation means. It’s a word I’d expect would be familiar to a high school graduate. But maybe I’m wrong.

Messing around with the language

If this Yahoo! Style writer is going to go for a common idiom, she does mess around:

mess aground sty

This delightful malapropism screams funny.

That’s no way to treat Celine Dion’s husband’s death

When dealing with a sensitive subject like death, try not to look like the Einstein on Yahoo! Style who doesn’t know when to use an apostrophe. And try not to do it in a headline:

husbands sty hp

This writer needs a vocabulary-improvement regimen

This Yahoo! Beauty writer could use a vocabulary-improvement regimen, sort of like those Word-a-Day calendars. Then she might learn the difference between a military unit of ground troops (like a regiment) and a procedure or routine (like a regimen):

regiment sty bea

Whose mistake is it?

Who’s responsible for this homophonic error on Yahoo! Beauty? Whose mistake is it?

whos breed bea

Who doesn’t know that who’s is a contraction of who is or who has. The writer and editor.

Did anyone hear her signing?

I just don’t understand the controversy that was recently covered by Yahoo! Sports. How many people could actually hear a woman signing the national anthem? I thought signing was a way to communicate with people who are hearing-challenged and therefore didn’t involve sounds:

signing mlb

This looks a lot like a sentence

This looks a lot like a sentence on the Yahoo! front page. It just doesn’t make a lot of sense, what with the missing word or words:

fp sounds a lot

Eek! An error!

Eek! Two errors compound this homophonic goof on Yahoo! Sports:

eek mlb

The expression is eke out, not eek out, not eke out of, and definitely not eek out of. The word eek is what cartoon characters (and apparently women in the 1970s) say when they see a mouse:

eek a mouse

Josh Hamilton: A man for our season

Josh Hamilton is ours for the season. I think. Or maybe he’s out for the season. I think. What do you think this headline from Yahoo! Sports really means?

our for season spo

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