No clue. No clue at all

I know this teaser on the home page of Yahoo! Finance is wrong, but I have no clue how to make it right:

Donald Trump lead makes no sense to me, even if the editor had used the correct past tense of lead, which is led. Is there a word or two missing? Should this be: Donald Trump’s election led …? Who knows!?

Also, who knows why the editor chose to use data as a plural noun. Although data can be used with either a singular or a plural verb, except in the most technical cases, it’s treated as a singular noun denoting a mass quantity. Anyone Googling the word would see that recent data shows it’s most often used with a singular verb.

Did they emigrate from a non-English-speaking country?

Did the Yahoo! Style writer and editor immigrate to the United States from a country where English isn’t the national language?

The word migrate is used to describe a historically significant movement of many people. The verb that is used to indicate the movement of an individual to another country is immigrate.

A mistake that will live in infamy

When Franklin Roosevelt called December 7, 1941, “a date which will live in infamy,” he wasn’t saying it would be famous. He was telling the world that it was a day that would be remembered for an evil act. When the Yahoo! Style used the word infamy to describe the effect of the Duchess of Cambridge on designers, she was saying she has no idea what infamy means:

Infamy is not a synonym for fame, just as infamous is not a synonym for famous. Infamy and infamous imply notoriety for evil, disgraceful, or criminal actions.

Stop meddling with the language

With competent editors, maybe Yahoo! News staffers will stop meddling with the language:

Seriously, have you ever heard of someone meddling of anything? Me neither. The correction expression is meddling in or meddling with.

Who you calling a “good writer”?

Based solely on this sentence from Yahoo! Style, would you call the author a “good writer“? Would it matter to you that she doesn’t know where to place a question mark? Because this blogger isn’t feeling so good right about now. And neither are the readers of this sentence:

New record errors in one sentence

This might just be a new record for number of errors in a single sentence:

It’s unimaginable to me (and to most English speakers) how the writer could think that sentence is okie-dokie for publication. She didn’t notice that prices starts is a grammatical horror? Or that prices can start at $700 and also go up to $1500. But there’s only one starting price for any item.  And prices … is sold? That one made me spit out my sugar-free, nonfat vanilla latte. That’s so bad, I almost didn’t notice the random and totally unnecessary at.

Break down that word

The writer for  Yahoo! Finance needs to break down breakdown, which is a noun. (The verb is two words).

Plus-size errors

What to do? What to do? What does one do if one can’t decide if a compound adjective needs a hyphen? Well, if one works at Yahoo! Style, one hyphenates it once, and leaves it unhyphenated once. Problem solved!

That solution is neither appropriate nor correct, just as the use of the word or, instead of nor, with neither is wrong.

I just can’t go on

I tried reading an article on Yahoo! Style, but I just can’t force myself to read beyond the first paragraph. It is so stunningly awful in its grammatical mistakes and ignorance of basic English, that I gave up. Here’s what I found with just a cursory examination of the ‘graph; I’m sure I missed a few things that merit attention:

My experience tells me that this writer is not a native English-speaker. Her mistakes are ones that are common with people who did not grow up speaking and writing English. But there’s no excuse for not providing her with a competent editor, if only to save her from embarrassments like these:

  • 18 years old should be 18-year-old. He is 18 years old, but he is an 18-year-old model.
  • instagram follower should be Instagram followers.
  • on first name term seems to be a bastardization of on a first name basis.
  • to loose his cherries for the first time is not just a vulgar expression, it’s kind of a stupid metaphor. First, she means lose, not loose. And one can only lose one’s cherry (which is singular) once. So I’m really confused as to what this is purported to mean. Maybe it just means the writer is both careless and ignorant.
  • There’s a missing the in at Coachella music festival.
  • will also be is redundant when one ends a sentence with too.
  • been to famous music festival needs a the.

I’m sure I missed something, and I didn’t even touch on the run-on sentences. Please, Yahoo!, get this gal an editor!

I didn’t even know heath needed care

The United States Congress will be voting on the care of heath:

I had no idea that heath care was even a thing or that it needed federal funding. Thank goodness Yahoo! News is here to keep us informed!

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