Try romancing a dictionary

This Yahoo! Style writer won’t be making headlines for her knowledge of English:

Her rumored romance with a dictionary is hoax. Perhaps her editor can enlighten her on the correct preposition to use in this situation.

Racking my brain

I’m racking my brain trying to figure out how this Yahoo! Style writer could use raked up in this context:

The phrasal verb rake up means uncover. The expression the writer meant was raked in or racked up.

A full-blown editing crisis

At a legitimate publication, this would spawn a full-blown editing crisis. At Yahoo! Style, it’s just another misused word:

Apparently the editor didn’t know that crises isn’t singular; it’s the plural of crisis.

Bask in this!

I hopin’ one of my loyal readers can explain this sentence from Yahoo! Style:

Can you be “hugging onto” a person or simply hugging them? Or hanging onto them? What does that mean?

While you’re at it, maybe you can explain how one basks in firework beauty. Are you warmed by a single pyrotechnic device? Or are you enjoying fireworks, which is an actual display of the devices common on the Fourth of July.

And then I stopped reading

I admit it. I really wasn’t interested in this article from Yahoo! Style, but I thought I could force myself to read it. And then I read it. Actually, I only read the first paragraph and couldn’t bring myself to read any further:

You may think you know Yahoo! writers, what with their use of incorrect words, but you don’t know half of it. My comments are based on the evidence (not based off of it). This paragraph is the latest brainchild of a Yahoo! writer (of “I don’t know where to put the parenthesis fame”).

Where do you keep your clothes?

While most people keep their clothes in a closet and maybe a dresser, this Yahoo! Style has wardrobe stables:

I think that means she hangs her dresses in a horse stall. Or it could just be proof that a dictionary should be a staple for every writer.

I suspect this is wrong

I’m not sure, but I think there’s an error in this headline from Yahoo! News:

Were there two London attacks, or were they suspected attacks? And what the heck was identified? I’m so confused. But so is the writer of this headline, I suspect.

At least it wasn’t tinnitus

Whew! Tinnitus, otherwise known as ringing in the ear, can be difficult to deal with. According to Yahoo! Movies, the  character Baby only suffered from ringing in his eardrums. That’s not so bad:

Tousling the language

Proving once again that knowledge of English isn’t a requirement for a job writing for yahoo.com, the Internet giant unleashes this assault on readers:

Mr. Fallon didn’t tussle anyone’s hair; that would involve a vigorous struggle or scuffle. What he did was tousle the then-candidate’s hair. He messed it up, similar to what Yahoo!’s editors are doing with the language.

Find a lucrative career

Here’s some unsolicited advice to the editors of yahoo.com: Find a lucrative career that doesn’t depend on knowledge of English:

The adjective lucrative doesn’t mean substantial or significant. It means profitable.

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