At least it wasn’t tinnitus

Whew! Tinnitus, otherwise known as ringing in the ear, can be difficult to deal with. According to Yahoo! Movies, the  character Baby only suffered from ringing in his eardrums. That’s not so bad:

Tousling the language

Proving once again that knowledge of English isn’t a requirement for a job writing for yahoo.com, the Internet giant unleashes this assault on readers:

Mr. Fallon didn’t tussle anyone’s hair; that would involve a vigorous struggle or scuffle. What he did was tousle the then-candidate’s hair. He messed it up, similar to what Yahoo!’s editors are doing with the language.

Find a lucrative career

Here’s some unsolicited advice to the editors of yahoo.com: Find a lucrative career that doesn’t depend on knowledge of English:

The adjective lucrative doesn’t mean substantial or significant. It means profitable.

Not a real designer

To most people Rei Kawakubo of Comme des Garçons is a designer. To a Yahoo! Style writer she’s not a real designer — only an honorary designer, even though she’s the honored designer of the Met Gala:

Brought to you live

Brought to you live by Yahoo! Finance: A misused word practically brought to life.

A blend of old and new

Here’s a blend of old and new on Yahoo! Style:

Using the wrong word is an old error on Yahoo!, but using the expression blend between instead of blend of is a new error.

What rich people look like

Displaying a remarkable ability to tell a person’s financial worth by a mere picture, the writer for Yahoo! Style declares the cast of a Las Vegas show “well-heeled”:

Here’s the picture that led to that bit of wisdom:

Can you tell that they’re wealthy? Or would you use a different word to describe them? Maybe one that you actually know the meaning of and that actually applies to the picture. Then maybe you can tell the writer that well-heeled means prosperous or wealthy.

No clue. No clue at all

I know this teaser on the home page of Yahoo! Finance is wrong, but I have no clue how to make it right:

Donald Trump lead makes no sense to me, even if the editor had used the correct past tense of lead, which is led. Is there a word or two missing? Should this be: Donald Trump’s election led …? Who knows!?

Also, who knows why the editor chose to use data as a plural noun. Although data can be used with either a singular or a plural verb, except in the most technical cases, it’s treated as a singular noun denoting a mass quantity. Anyone Googling the word would see that recent data shows it’s most often used with a singular verb.

Did they emigrate from a non-English-speaking country?

Did the Yahoo! Style writer and editor immigrate to the United States from a country where English isn’t the national language?

The word migrate is used to describe a historically significant movement of many people. The verb that is used to indicate the movement of an individual to another country is immigrate.

A mistake that will live in infamy

When Franklin Roosevelt called December 7, 1941, “a date which will live in infamy,” he wasn’t saying it would be famous. He was telling the world that it was a day that would be remembered for an evil act. When the Yahoo! Style used the word infamy to describe the effect of the Duchess of Cambridge on designers, she was saying she has no idea what infamy means:

Infamy is not a synonym for fame, just as infamous is not a synonym for famous. Infamy and infamous imply notoriety for evil, disgraceful, or criminal actions.

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