Maybe you could run into a dictionary

What’s the difference between a run-in and running into someone? A whole lot, but not to this Yahoo! Style writer:


A run-in is an angry disagreement. There was no disagreement in this case, just someone named Jenner running into (meeting or encountering, often by chance) a magazine rep.

Editors humiliate themselves

The editor or editors behind this headline on should be humiliated for writing this:


A woman can be humiliated, but a woman’s looks? Not so much.

Falling for the wrong word

You might be under the impression that a professional writer for Yahoo! Style is intimately familiar with the English language. You would be wrong:


The verb to use with “under the impression” is some form of to be. I’m under the impression that readers are under the impression that they deserve better than this.

Knock out that buy out

For a reason I will never understand, editors and writers at Yahoo! have trouble distinguishing between a phrasal verb and a noun. This time it’s evidenced on the home page of Yahoo! Finance — with not one, but two nouns, each of which should be two words:


Buyout is a noun; the phrasal verb is buy out. Knockout is a noun; the verb phrase is knock out.

You know what’s really funny? Even if the editor had written “Cabela’s to buy out Bass Pro…” that headline would still be wrong. I didn’t realize how really, really wrong it was until I saw the title of the article behind that headline:


Foxy stars of ‘Teen Wolf’

Don’t you love it when a writer tries to use an unusual or fancy-pants word and gets it wrong? Me, too. I just love the use of vulpine in this article on Yahoo! Style about “Teen Wolf” stars:


Vulpine refers to a fox or something resembling a fox. The word that refers to a wolf is lupine.

Look elsewhere

These misused words on Yahoo! Finance come at a time when everyone seems particularly sensitive to language:


Consumers in the market for reliable, well-written financial advice might look elsewhere.

Donning models

When Philipp Plein donned his models, according to Yahoo! Style, he put them on himself.


I imagine he looked something like this model, who has donned another model:


Someone needs to explain to the writer than don means “to put on.”

Kim Kardashian and deadly fame

If you’re unfamiliar with French, as this Yahoo! Style writer appears to be, perhaps you should avoid certain words and phrases, like femme fatale:


What month would you select?

What month would you select in the Dylann Roof trial? According to, a July selection begins in the trial.


But what is the selection for? Personally, I’d prefer to see a jury selection start now for Mr. Roof’s trial.

Speaking out

I must speak out about the writing by Yahoo! Answers staff: It sucks.


Judging by the incorrect word usage, I’d guess that the writer is not a native English speaker. Why do I think that? The CEO of Mylan testified before Congress. Neither the CEO nor Mylan can be accused of “speaking out,” which means to talk freely and fearlessly. Quite the contrary. The expression “in the recent years” isn’t familiar to me, but “in recent years” is. And people aren’t affected about an issue, but affected by one.

This writer just isn’t familiar enough with English to be let loose on the public without the support of a competent editor.

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