Readers all scream “Wrong!”

If you’re quoting people who are screaming, you probably want to punctuate the scream with an exclamation mark. And unlike the writer for Yahoo! Shopping, you probably know it belongs inside the quotation marks:

summer excl shop

Is that correct? Not by a long shot

Is this idiom used correctly on Yahoo! Style? Not by a long shot. And by that I mean, “NO!” Jeez, doesn’t the writer know that a long shot is a horse, person, or occurrence that has little or no chance of succeeding?

long shot

This writer also is a long shot for succeeding at writing. If she’s not the worst writer at Yahoo!, she’s at least a runner-up.

Woe is me!

Woe is me! I made the mistake of reading this headline on Yahoo! Style:

woes me 1

I couldn’t figure out if Mr. Blacc had won the writer over or bowled her over. Does it matter? This writer was obviously suffering from the encounter and it spills over into her writing.

This gal loves her some commas, which she sprinkles liberally throughout the piece along with an extraneous word or two. But the fun for us is trying to figure out how a black suit comes with a white jacket:

woes me 2

Let’s say fare-thee-well to “has fared him well,” because that makes no sense. This writer is obviously a tad vocabulary-challenged. Perhaps she meant “has served him well.” A dictionary might just serve her well.

woes me 3

What is ‘Walking Dead’ character’s real name?

Did you think the “gentle giant” on the TV show “The Walking Dead” was called Tyreese? You’d be wrong. According to the folks at the Yahoo! front page, that was a nickname or a pseudonym or something else:

fp tyreese

Ha-ha. I kid. I am a kidder. The character is Tyreese and the mistake is Yahoo!’s by putting quotation marks around the name. They just don’t belong there. It’s like referring to the Shakespearean characters as “Romeo” and “Juliet.”

On the off chance you’re a writer…

On the off chance that the writer for Yahoo! Style would like to improve her writing, I suggest she study some common English idioms (like on the off chance) as well as the use of the hyphen to form compound adjectives (like two-piece):

in the off chance style

It get’s an apostrophe

If it ends in an S, it gets an apostrophe. That seems to be the philosophy of punctuation over at Yahoo! Makers:

gets apost diy

Refashion cash-in

Somebody at Yahoo! Finance needs to check the dictionary and then remove the hyphen from cash-in in the headline and the video:

cash-in finance

It’s New Year’s Day

It’s close to being New Year’s Day on the Yahoo! front page, but someone forgot a little curvy character:

fp new years day

1 New Year’s Eve mistake you don’t have to make

Here’s one New Year’s Eve mistake from Yahoo! DIY that I’m sure you’ll avoid:

nye no apost diy

Don’t forget the apostrophe in Year’s. That’s it. You’re welcome.

Back off the punctuation!

Here’s something you don’t see often, three consecutive punctuation marks:

colon parent

I don’t know the thinking behind all those little symbols on Yahoo! Parenting, but at least one of them is in the wrong place. If the writer insists on using both quotation marks and a colon, then the colon should go after the closing quotation mark. It is one of two punctuation characters that always go after a closing quotation mark in the U.S.; the other is the semicolon.


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