A series of mistakes

The series of mistake in Yahoo! News leaves me dumbfounded:

series-leave-new

The word series is both singular and plural. If you’re referring to a single series, it’s singular and takes a singular verb like leaves.

Editor shows us exactly how not to write a headline

Here’s a tip for Yahoo! Style editors: Although New Orleans ends in an S, it is not plural, it is singular. And this is wrong:

new-orleans-show-sty-hp

His influence is not to be overlooked

According to a certain Yahoo! Style writer, George Michael’s influence on fashion and style are not to be overlooked:

in-his-staid-sty

Apparently to the writer (and her editor), though, think it’s OK to overlook grammar — like matching a subject (say, influence) with a correct verb (let’s just say it ain’t are). In its stead, the writer should have used is. And in staid‘s stead, she should have used stead.

All good things come to an end

All good things come to an end, and in this excerpt from Yahoo! Style that end starts with the fourth word:

of-our-dream-sty

Why couldn’t the writer match the verb to the subject? Probably for the same reason she thought “our dream” was a substitute for “our dreams.”

Number of errors has skyrocketed

The number of grammatical errors on Yahoo! Style hasn’t really skyrocketed. It’s just held steady at a number that is far too large for a professionally written site. Here’s just one more example:

searches-has-sty

I can’t explain how a mistake like that gets made. Maybe the writer thought the subject of the verb was accessory, and not searches. Yeah, I’m going with that.

Writer and editor has a problem

This Yahoo! Celebrity writer and his/her editor have a problem with grammar — specifically, matching a verb to its subject:

has-cel

Yahoo clinches worst headline of the day

Yahoo! Sports clinches the title for worst headline of the day with this mismatch of a singular subject and a plural verb:

clinch-spo-hp

Who is your writing crush?

Do you have a crush on a writer? I don’t. But if I did, it wouldn’t be this Yahoo! Style writer who can’t construct a grammatically correct question and can’t tell the difference between loose (which rhymes with noose) and lose (which rhymes with news), which is the word she should have used:

loose-sty

What does an editor, writer, or proofreader say?

What does an editor, writer, or proofreader say about this from Yahoo! Style?

do-say-sty

They say, “Time to make an arrest and send this writer and editor to the grammar slammer!”

They all know that when a subject consists of two or more singular nouns joined by or, the verb must be singular.

Neither writer nor editor

Over at Yahoo! Style, neither the writer nor the editor has spotted this grammatical goof:

neither-have-released-sty

When two words are joined by neither…nor, the verb must agree with the word closer to it, which in this case is the singular Hadid, and the verb should be has released.

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