Neither writer nor editor

Over at Yahoo! Style, neither the writer nor the editor has spotted this grammatical goof:


When two words are joined by neither…nor, the verb must agree with the word closer to it, which in this case is the singular Hadid, and the verb should be has released.

Not a good place for a typo

Let’s take the charitable view and call this a typo on Yahoo! News:


Typo or egregious grammatical error? Doesn’t matter when it’s in a headline that big. It looks really bad.

Here’s 1 standout grammatical error

Here’s one standout grammatical error on the home page of Yahoo! Style:


Here are five common errors you’ll find on Yahoo!:

  • Mismatch of a subject (like moments) and its verb (which should be are, not is)

OK, that’s only one common error, but you get the point.

Are those letters to legislators?

While I’m pondering what “capitol letters” are (could they be missives to representatives on Capitol Hill?), you can ponder the mystery that is a mismatched subject and verb on Yahoo! Finance:


The word capitol means only one thing: A building or buildings where legislatures meet. If you mean something else (including uppercase letters), use capital. Maybe someone at Yahoo! can explain why using incorrect words does not matter to the Internet giant.

Maybe this wasn’t written in this country

While reading this photo caption on Yahoo! Style, I was struck by the writer’s use of the British whilst:


Perhaps Yahoo! outsourced the writing to an almost-English-speaking country. Maybe this was written for a UK site, and not for the American market. Maybe that’s why the writer capitalized queen; in some countries that are not the United States, that might actually be correct. And maybe that Lady Fag she writes of isn’t related to Ladyfag, the writer from New York City. The typo of that for than might be okie-dokie in the land where she lives. But in no English-speaking country is is what makes an acceptable substitute for the correct are what make.

Someone could use a grammar book

It looks like this Yahoo! Finance writer didn’t bother buying a grammar book. Perhaps she was concerned that the cost of books has soared. Perhaps she thought that she mastered grammar in fifth grade. Perhaps she can’t identify a singular subject (like cost) and match the correct verb to it (like has soared):


Each of these is wrong

What do these sentences have in common?

  • No misspelling ever appears on Yahoo!.
  • Articles written by Yahoo! staffers are grammatically correct.
  • Yahoo! articles are always accurate.

Each one of these sentences is wrong — just like this excerpt from Yahoo! Sports, where the writer can’t match the verb (which should be is) to the singular subject:

each are spo

After reading this…

After reading this on Yahoo! Beauty, I don’t feel good:

selfies makes bea

Let’s hope that was just a typo; I’d hate to think the writer thought it was correct.

Did the editor take a detour?

So, the editor for Yahoo! Sports was going to check this headline — you know, for grammatical errors, spelling, that sort of thing — but took a detour at the latte station and totally forgot about this:

takes mlb

Ha! I made that up. I really don’t know why that headline contains that error. It seems pretty obvious that there’s a plural subject, but a singular verb.

Neither was correct

It looks like the editor and writer for Yahoo! Sports gave this the stamp of approval:

neither were name mlb

Unfortunately, neither was correct. The pronoun neither is singular. Just sayin’.

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