Headline needs to read aggressively

Here’s why you need to proofread before you publish: You don’t want your audience to think that they’re reading  Yahoo! Finance, where headline writers drop words and never pick them up:

meeds-to-bought-fin

All writing serves a purpose

All writing serves a purpose. And the purpose of this article from Yahoo! Style may be to illustrate what not to do. First lesson: If you’re including names in your article, spell them correctly. It’s not enough to just misspell them in the same way. If you’re writing about Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, Google her name.

huntingdon-1

Second, if you’re writing about editors-in-chief, don’t capitalize the title and don’t look like an idiot by forming the plural incorrectly. And make sure you’re confident enough in your English to include the article the in “in the second row” and “in the third row.”

Don’t follow the example of this gal. She’s nothing if not consistent. When she misspells a name like Stella Tennant, she sticks with it. None of this silly Googling a name to check the spelling:

huntingdon-2

Finally we encounter this gem, a sterling example of what not to do:

huntingdon-3

The takeaway: Read everything you write before you publish it. Read everything you write before you publish it.

Trump cut short

People must be getting nervous over at Yahoo! Finance, and it’s affecting their work. It looks like a little p ran out of Mr. Trump:

trum fin

And instead of merely appealing the EU tax decision, Apple will appeal against it, which might mean something to the writer, but to me means the writer is unfamiliar with English:

appeal against fin hp

I don’t know why Apple will appeal the decision. Heck if I owed a $14.50 tax bill, I’d just pay it:

14.5 news hp

Maybe it’s the principle of the thing. Or maybe the stress is getting to those folks at Yahoo!.

Talk about abrupt!

If there’s anything in this world that is abrupt, it’s this sentence on yahoo.com:

fo abrupt of

I think it’s like the word game Mad Libs, except readers are supposed to supply the missing word or words. So, gimme a noun and we’ll plug it into “the abrupt noun of Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort.”

U.S. 8-year medal drought finally over

Forget what you think you know about Michael Phelps, the Final Five U.S. gymnasts, and Simone Manuel. It’s all a hoax. The United States of America hasn’t won a medal in the Olympics since 2008. At least until this boxer came along:

fp first medal

The long drought of losses and disappointment at the Olympics is finally over. At least according to Yahoo!.

Ha-ha. I kid. The truth is, Mr. Hernandez won the first medal in boxing for the U.S. since 2008. It’s just a teensy, weensy, itsy, bitsy detail that some editor forgot to mention.

Michael Phelps is not that big

At 6′ 4″ Michael Phelps is a big guy, but not big enough to carry the entire United States, despite what you may read on yahoo.com:

fp carry us

Truth is, he’ll be carrying the U.S. flag in the opening ceremony at the Olympics in Rio, not the U.S. and not into Rio.

A never-ending ability to make mistakes

The editors at yahoo.com display a never-ending ability to make mistakes:

fp ability make

Guess the missing word!

There’s a word missing from this headline on Yahoo! Style. Do you know what it is?

miss wd sty hp

This looks a lot like a sentence

This looks a lot like a sentence on the Yahoo! front page. It just doesn’t make a lot of sense, what with the missing word or words:

fp sounds a lot

They looking not so good

Editors at yahoo.com must be under a lot of stress and it shows. I wonder if they are looking for the missing word here:

fp they looking

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