Each of these is wrong

What do these sentences have in common?

  • No misspelling ever appears on Yahoo!.
  • Articles written by Yahoo! staffers are grammatically correct.
  • Yahoo! articles are always accurate.

Each one of these sentences is wrong — just like this excerpt from Yahoo! Sports, where the writer can’t match the verb (which should be is) to the singular subject:

each are spo

In-house editor needed

If ever there was a site that needed a competent in-house editor, it’s Yahoo! Style. Someone who knows that in-house needs a hyphen would be a start:

pedigree style

Someone who knows that “designed in house from a pedigree of experienced industry personnel” makes absolutely no sense could be helpful. It would be great if that person knew to shorten that to “designed in-house by experienced industry personnel.” Someone who knew that “boasts their apparel to be” also is nonsense and should be something like “boasts their apparel is.” An in-house editor would be great. Heck, even an outhouse editor could be great.

It’s so unclear

After reading this on yahoo.com, I can’t figure out which players were fined:

fp its players

Were all WNBA players fined? It seems unlikely, but I’m hard-pressed to find any other singular noun that could be the antecedent for its. It’s more likely that the players on three teams were fined. If that’s the case, it’s clear that the writer should have referred to their players.

After reading this…

After reading this on Yahoo! Beauty, I don’t feel good:

selfies makes bea

Let’s hope that was just a typo; I’d hate to think the writer thought it was correct.

To whoever is reading this

To whoever is reading this: The Yahoo! Sports writer is confused about the use of whomever (which is the objective case of whoever and is used as the object of a preposition) and whoever (which can be the subject of a verb like was listening):

to whomever spo

This writer isn’t alone in his confusion. To many people, it appears that whomever is the object of the preposition to, but it’s the entire clause that’s the object of the preposition. And whoever should be the subject of the verb in that clause.

If you’re not into being grammatically nitpicky and you’re faced with the choice between who and whom or whoever and whomever, go with who or whoever. In more the half the cases, you’ll be correct, and even if you’re wrong, your writing will sound more authentic and less stilted and formal.

We will emphasize with emphasis

We (meaning me and my keyboard) will emphasize that this Yahoo! Sports writer has confused a noun (like emphasis) with a verb (like emphasize):

we will emphasis mlb

Did the editor take a detour?

So, the editor for Yahoo! Sports was going to check this headline — you know, for grammatical errors, spelling, that sort of thing — but took a detour at the latte station and totally forgot about this:

takes mlb

Ha! I made that up. I really don’t know why that headline contains that error. It seems pretty obvious that there’s a plural subject, but a singular verb.

Weave got a problem

It looks like we’ve got a problem with a verb over at Yahoo! TV:

weaved tv otnb

If you mean “To make (a path or way) by winding in and out or from side to side,” then the past tense of the verb is weaved: The Uber driver weaved in and out of traffic. We weaved our way through the crowded marketplace.

If the meaning you’re after is “to combine elements into a complex whole,” then the correct word is wove or woven: He wove a fascinating story. One of the most prevalent themes woven…

Her has made a mistake

Did this really sound right to the Yahoo! Beauty writer? Maybe it seemed right to the editor, too. So she and her editor have made a laughable grammatical mistake with this pronoun:

her 4 she sty

Judd Apatow is singular

Neither the Yahoo! Movies editors nor the writer has any idea what the correct verb is here:

have pushed mov

When a compound subject (like reviews and Judd Apatow) is joined by neither…nor, the verb must agree with the subject closer to it. In this case, it’s Judd Apatow and the verb should be has pushed.

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