Let’s run through that again

Let’s run through this one more time for the folks at Yahoo! Style: If you’re unsure of the spelling of a word, consult a dictionary. If a word looks funny (like, oh, say, maybe throughs), consult a dictionary:

run-throughs-sty

If the writer had done that, she might have seen that run-throughs is a noun requiring a hyphen. Just in case incidents like this happen to arise, editors can cut them out and replace them with the correct word. Editors can also be sure pronouns (like them, not it) match their antecedents (which in this case is incidents).

Number of errors has skyrocketed

The number of grammatical errors on Yahoo! Style hasn’t really skyrocketed. It’s just held steady at a number that is far too large for a professionally written site. Here’s just one more example:

searches-has-sty

I can’t explain how a mistake like that gets made. Maybe the writer thought the subject of the verb was accessory, and not searches. Yeah, I’m going with that.

Writer and editor has a problem

This Yahoo! Celebrity writer and his/her editor have a problem with grammar — specifically, matching a verb to its subject:

has-cel

Yahoo clinches worst headline of the day

Yahoo! Sports clinches the title for worst headline of the day with this mismatch of a singular subject and a plural verb:

clinch-spo-hp

What does an editor, writer, or proofreader say?

What does an editor, writer, or proofreader say about this from Yahoo! Style?

do-say-sty

They say, “Time to make an arrest and send this writer and editor to the grammar slammer!”

They all know that when a subject consists of two or more singular nouns joined by or, the verb must be singular.

Not a good place for a typo

Let’s take the charitable view and call this a typo on Yahoo! News:

russia-say

Typo or egregious grammatical error? Doesn’t matter when it’s in a headline that big. It looks really bad.

Here’s 1 standout grammatical error

Here’s one standout grammatical error on the home page of Yahoo! Style:

heres-5-sty-hp

Here are five common errors you’ll find on Yahoo!:

  • Mismatch of a subject (like moments) and its verb (which should be are, not is)

OK, that’s only one common error, but you get the point.

It was bound to happen

When it became acceptable (at least in some circles) to use the pronouns they, their, and them to refer to an individual of unknown gender, it was bound to happen: Those same plural pronouns would be used when a singular pronoun is required. It happened on yahoo.com:

fp-their-cause

The pronoun their refers to one of two candidates, both of whom are purported to be male. The correct pronoun is the singular his.

Are those letters to legislators?

While I’m pondering what “capitol letters” are (could they be missives to representatives on Capitol Hill?), you can ponder the mystery that is a mismatched subject and verb on Yahoo! Finance:

capitol-letters-fin

The word capitol means only one thing: A building or buildings where legislatures meet. If you mean something else (including uppercase letters), use capital. Maybe someone at Yahoo! can explain why using incorrect words does not matter to the Internet giant.

Women and her lifetime

Will Yahoo! Style writers make the same mistakes throughout their lifetime? Will they fail to understand that a plural noun (like women) requires a plural pronoun (like their)?

women-her-sty

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