Cast and crew: one and the same?

According to Yahoo! Movies, the “Suicide Squad” cast and crew are a single unit; either that, or the writer can’t match a verb to its subject:

celebrates mov

Uncovering the quote

Holy moley. In what universe is the pronoun its correct in this sentence from Yahoo! Style?

its baring sty

What does it refer to? newbie? tools? I think the writer meant tools and just didn’t recognize it as a plural noun requiring the plural pronoun their. It’s a careless oversight, just like using the wrong closing quotation mark.

I’m calling T-shirts baring a quote total BS. T-shirts don’t bare quotes, though they’ve been known to bear them.

It should be getting hotter

Someone should turn the heat on the writers and editors at the Yahoo! front page. Maybe then we wouldn’t be subjected to grammatical gaffes:

fp wave smother

This is so different

This little paragraph from Yahoo! Style is so different from what you’d expect from a senior editor:

us mortals sty

Wouldn’t you expect that someone with that title would know to use different from us and not different than us? Maybe that’s asking too much of someone who thinks that us can be the subject of a verb. It can’t. The fact is, we mere mortals who read Yahoo! know more about grammar than its “senior editors.”

A word that’s not right

English is funny. And challenging. It provides lots of words for lots of circumstances. But it’s also missing a few words that would be of benefit to writers and readers. One of those missing words is a possessive form of the word that. (Make that two missing words; which doesn’t have a possessive form either.) But that didn’t stop the writer for Yahoo! Autos from trying to come up with one — and failing:

car thats auto

The writer might have used whose: a car whose value is beginning to soar. But that might have set off alarm bells among grammarians who feel who and whose cannot be applied to non-humans. What’s a writer to do? Recast the sentence. One of these might have worked:

  • a car with a value that’s beginning to soar
  • when the car’s value is beginning to soar
  • a car the value of which is beginning to soar

Each of those options is slightly longer, slightly different in meaning, or slightly awkward. But none of those would have appeared in Terribly Write.

Would that be an Alp?

Kylie Jenner’s cap and gown, which she word for her high school graduation, are two objects, I think. Isn’t that a plural subject in this sentence from Yahoo! Style?

sneak peak sty

If that were the only problem with that sentence, I’d probably ignore it. But no! The writer had to go tell us about a “sneak peak,” which I think refers to some mountain, like an Alp. Readers might be more interested in a sneak peek of a party thrown by Ryan Seacrest. Hey, at least she didn’t tell us it was throne by Mr. Seacrest. So maybe it’s not so bad.

My ‘aha’ moment

Reading this on Yahoo! Makers, I had an “aha” moment: This writer is in need of a competent editor and a course in English and writing:

a-ha diy

It wasn’t the incorrectly capitalized portobello; it wasn’t even the incorrectly hyphenated aha, although both indicate a careless writer unfamiliar with a basic dictionary. It was the dangling participle styling, which leads readers to believe that Mushroom Savanna did the styling of the fungi.

Whoever decided this was correct…

Whoever decided that whomever was correct in this excerpt from Yahoo! Style was wrong:

whomever decided sty

The pronoun whomever is the objective case of whoever, meaning that it can be the object of a preposition, but not the subject of a verb like, oh, say decided.

Sometimes I think writers use whom and whomever because they think it sounds more sophisticated or erudite. When used correctly, it might.

I’ll never ever understand

I’ll never ever understand who sentences like this one from Yahoo! TV get past the editors:

none never

If I believe this, then all pupils on “The Simpsons” seem to graduate. Which is not what the writer meant. Someone needs to explain the effect of a double negative like none and never.

Which word looks best?

Which of these words in this Yahoo! Movies title looks best?

which look mov

Here’s a hint: It ain’t look, since it’s plural and its subject is which, which isn’t.

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