If you don;t like this…

If you don’t like the use of a semicolon to form a contraction, you won’t like this caption from Yahoo! Makers. But it doesn’t stop there: Your eyes aren’t deceiving you, the writer (who happens to be the site’s editor in chief) doesn’t know the difference between you’re and your and she omitted the hyphen in the compound adjective store-bought:

dont like youre diy

How many can you spot?

This is like Find Waldo, except you’re looking for the errors committed by one writer for Yahoo! Makers. How many can you find?

bike stor

I’m going with these:

  • an invisible storage? Shouldn’t that be just invisible storage?
  • If it’s like invisible storage, then you wouldn’t see it, would you? Then how could you hardly ever see it?
  • Misspelling! That misspelled allows was just too easy.
  • Your bike themselves? Really? Does the writer really not understand the concept of matching a pronoun with the noun it refers to? And why include themselves (or even the correct itself)?

Your turn. What did I miss?

Even when there’s more than one, there’s only one

There’s only one aircraft. Even if you’re talking about more than one plane, there’s only aircraft — it’s both a singular and plural noun. You’d think a writer for Yahoo! travel would know that:

aircrafts tra

Series of errors is common

A series of errors on the Yahoo! front page is not unusual. It’s quite common to see a mismatch of a subject (like series) and its verb (which should be aims):

fp series aim

The noun series is both singular and plural. In this case, it’s used as a singular noun because there’s only one series of ads.

Gambling on it

I’ll bet anyone dollars to donuts that the editors for the Yahoo! front page have no idea what an antecedent is and why a pronoun must agree with it:

fp gambling on it

An antecedent is the noun that a pronoun refers to. The pronoun must agree with its antecedent, meaning that they both must be the same number (singular or plural). A plural noun (like oh, say, maybe fights) requires a plural pronoun (like them).

I cry sometimes, too

I admit that I cry sometimes, especially when I read something as stupid as this sentence from Yahoo! Answers:

yamster

There is no rational explanation possible for using they to refer to a Yamster, which appears to be a hamster mascot for the Yahoo! site. Unless the Yamster is a collective name for conjoined twins, and Yahoo! is hiding the other twin out of our view. As for the rest of the text, just be thankful that I obscured some words with my red circle. You really don’t want to read that juvenile, amateurishly written tripe.

The number of errors is increasing

The number of errors on Yahoo! is increasing every day. A number of errors have appeared on yahoo.com every day:

fp a number has

Here’s what the American Heritage Dictionary says about matching a verb to the noun number:

As a collective noun number may take either a singular or a plural verb. It takes a singular verb when it is preceded by the definite article the: The number of skilled workers is increasing. It takes a plural verb when preceded by the indefinite article a: A number of the workers have learned new skills.

Arriving at the wrong word

When trying to choose the correct word to follow arriving, the writer for Yahoo! Style arrived at the wrong preposition:

arriving to sty

Here’s some helpful information from Daily Writing Tips:

A prepositional error usually associated with ESL learners seems to be gaining ground with native English speakers. It’s the error of following the verb arrive with the preposition to…

To is a preposition of movement. One travels to a restaurant, but arrives at a restaurant.

Prepositions that can follow arrive include at, in, and on.

Check out the site for some great examples of the correct use of those prepositions with arrive.

Casting about for the right word

Proving that being grammatically challenged is no barrier to getting a job writing for the Yahoo! front page, this writer should have cast off the ED on what should be cast:

fp casted

Repeat after me: Today I cast, yesterday I cast, I have cast.

I have never found myself doing that

I admit it: I have never found myself sat at my desk. However, I have found myself sitting at my desk. That is because I am familiar with English and grammar and words and idioms, and I take pride in that knowledge. I wonder what the writer for Yahoo! Makers takes pride in:

sat diy

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