All writing serves a purpose

All writing serves a purpose. And the purpose of this article from Yahoo! Style may be to illustrate what not to do. First lesson: If you’re including names in your article, spell them correctly. It’s not enough to just misspell them in the same way. If you’re writing about Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, Google her name.

huntingdon-1

Second, if you’re writing about editors-in-chief, don’t capitalize the title and don’t look like an idiot by forming the plural incorrectly. And make sure you’re confident enough in your English to include the article the in “in the second row” and “in the third row.”

Don’t follow the example of this gal. She’s nothing if not consistent. When she misspells a name like Stella Tennant, she sticks with it. None of this silly Googling a name to check the spelling:

huntingdon-2

Finally we encounter this gem, a sterling example of what not to do:

huntingdon-3

The takeaway: Read everything you write before you publish it. Read everything you write before you publish it.

All by one photographer

I know that paparazzi can seem to be everywhere, but is it really possible that one photographer took all the pictures for this article on Yahoo! Movies?

paparazzo mov

It’s possible, but not likely. What is likely: The writer thinks that paparazzo is a plural, meaning photographers. It is not. It is the singular of paparazzi.

The Kardashians aren’t possessive

The Kardashians might have a lot of possessions, but they’re not possessive. The plural is Kardashians, without an apostrophe. Please ignore what you read on Yahoo! Beauty:

kar

Chickens’ hit

Why was the Yahoo! Style writer confused about how to form the possessive of a plural noun like chickens?

chickenss prom sty

Maybe she couldn’t decide if the apostrophe went before or after the S. So, she put it before and after the S. That’s actually quite a clever solution. Totally wrong, though.

If it ends in S, add an apostrophe

It seems that the writer for Yahoo! Style thinks that a word ending in S requires an apostrophe, even if it’s a simple plural:

models apos sty

Watch out for these annoying errors

If you’re reading Yahoo! Finance, watch out for the annoying errors, like this attempt at making traveler plural:

travelers fin

There’s no apostrophe in that plural, except in the mind of Yahoo!’s editors.

Belt and suspenders. Again

It seems writers at Yahoo! Celebrity still haven’t figured out how to form the possessive of a plural noun:

actorss apos cel

What this writer has managed to do was create the possessive of a noun that is both singular and plural. Very creative.

Are emoji plural? These writers certainly don’t know

What’s the plural of emoji? According to the folks at Yahoo! Style, it’s emojis. And emoji.

emojis sty

It looks like they can’t figure out which plural is correct (and heaven forbid they should consult a dictionary), so they used both plurals.

Apostrophes: Extraneous edition

Imagine going to the trouble and expense of creating a graphic for the Yahoo! Style home page, and then screwing it up by stuffing an apostrophe in a simple plural like Oscars:

oscars apos sty

Bring those jobs back to the U.S.!

I’m kinda appalled by this on the Yahoo! front page:

fp womens apos

Is this really the best Yahoo! can do? Has the company outsourced all writing to a non-English-speaking country? Or are these errors the result of a public school education in the U.S.? How do you explain the fact that a professional writer or editor doesn’t know the possessive of women is women’s and that in the United States, Congress is a proper noun?

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