Holly Holm isn’t the only one with a memory lapse

Reporting on Holly Holm’s memory lapse, the editors for yahoo.com seem to have forgotten that rapper Jay Z removed the hyphen from his name back in 2013:

fp jay-z holm

Hyphen happy

It’s not enough to be capitalization crazy, putting capital letters at the front of common nouns like holiday. No, that’s not enough for this Yahoo! Makers writer. She’s also idiom idiotic, with some crazy idiom stepping out, which makes no sense:

holiday cap diy

No, that’s not enough. She also happens to be hyphen happy, adding them indiscriminately in what should be seven-day lead-up. Two hyphens. That’s enough.

Life in the Royal Statute Factory

Although this writer for Yahoo! Style claims “we’ve all read the history books,” I don’t think she learned a lot:

ordinance sty

I’m not referring to her inability to pound out the word battlefield. Or her insistence on using a hyphen after an adverb ending in -LY. I’m referring to her mention of the Royal Ordinance Factory, which would be a place where statutes, regulations, or orders are manufactured.

It’s too bad there’s no ordinance prohibiting the incorrect use of words in a public place. This gal would be arrested and sent up the river because anyone who “read the history books” knows that military material, including weapons and ammunition, is ordnance.

Here’s an idea for when you’re bored

Here’s a quick DIY for the Yahoo! Makers editor for when she’s bored at her parents’ house waiting for Thanksgiving Dinner: Let some basic, fourth-grade grammar focusing on the use of the apostrophe to form possessives:

parents diy

Just call her EIC

I don’t get it. Does this woman write in the third person? Is she or isn’t she the author of this article? And is she the editor in chief or the editor-in-chief of Yahoo! Makers? Seems to me that whoever wrote this should know:

editor in chief mak

Perhaps my standards are just too high. Maybe I need to lower them and accept that plural subjects don’t need to have plural verbs.

Good use of two months’ rent

Here’s a thought for the “market editor” for Yahoo! Style: Invest about two months’ rent in a grammar class.

two months rent

You might learn something that would benefit you in your job, such as the use of an apostrophe in a quasi-possessive like two weeks’ pay, one day’s rest, and six years’ experience.

The depth of ignorance

This might actually be funny if it weren’t for the fact that it shows the depth of ignorance of one Yahoo! Makers writer:

waddle diy

A turkey’s “waddle” is its clumsy walk. But it seems that the writer was just kidding! Maybe that’s why she put those quotation marks around the word. I’m pretty sure she meant wattle, which is skin hanging from a turkey’s neck or throat. It is not the “red floppy part on top of the head.” That would be a comb. And it is not the “red floppy part … under the chin” because turkey’s do not have chins.

Well, it looks like the writer finally concluded that the area under a turkey’s beak is not really a chin. I think. I have no idea why this genius decided to put apostrophes about the word the second time she used it and not the first time. And those apostrophes are wrong, as is the placement of the period.

Imagine, a professional writer getting paid to screw up one single sentence in so many creative ways. Maybe she’s not the only ignorant staffer at Yahoo!.

You write the top, I’ll write the bottom

In this episode of “You Write the Top, I’ll Write the Bottom,” we witness a disagree about the need for a hyphen in a compound adjective, and the resulting inconsistency:

fp love scene

Someone should really get these people to communicate with each other. Pick up a phone. Text. Email. Instant message. Smoke signals. Anything to get these folks on the same page.

Sentence to which I am confused

OK, so placing a comma after a closing quotation mark isn’t a mistake everywhere — just in the U.S. But writing a sentence like this from Yahoo! Makers is the opposite of clear communication:

to which you use mak

Transforming transatlantic

The writer for Yahoo! Travel transformed transatlantic with an incorrect hyphen and a capital letter:

trans-atlantic tra

Often, when a prefix is added to a proper noun, the combination is hyphenated, like un-American, pre-Columbian, and non-Euclidean. But transatlantic is an exception to that general rule.


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