That’s no way to treat Celine Dion’s husband’s death

When dealing with a sensitive subject like death, try not to look like the Einstein on Yahoo! Style who doesn’t know when to use an apostrophe. And try not to do it in a headline:

husbands sty hp

Prom? Is that your question?

It’s a short question, and it may mean something to a Yahoo! Style reader, but to me it’s nonsense:

prom ques sty hp

Prom? That’s the question? Uh, no. The question is: Are these kids too young to be dressing up for ‘prom’? The entire headline is a question, not just the word in the quotation marks.

One day’s worth of errors

This doesn’t represent one day’s worth of errors; it just represents a single error in a single caption on Yahoo! Style:

three weeks worth sty

This is what the Associated Press calls a quasi possessive. If you’re as confused about whether it requires an apostrophe, I have a little trick you can use so you don’t embarrass yourself in public.

Let’s make sure this is correct

Let’s pretend that the Yahoo! Style writer knows what a contraction is and knows that it requires an apostrophe:

lets make sty

Uniquely unprepared to edit

The editors at the Yahoo! front page seem uniquely unqualified to perform their jobs. They just can’t remember that there’s no hyphen between an adverb ending in -LY (like, oh, say, maybe uniquely) and the word that follows it:

fp uniquely-shaped

Clean up your flippin’ writing

When I was a kid, the only F-word we used when to express anger or frustration by using an adjective, was flippin‘. “I don’t want your flippin’ Hula Hoop!” I might yell. Or, “Get your flippin’ hands off my Howdy Doody puppet!” So, of course, I assume that the Yahoo! Sports writer was using flipping as a euphemism for another word beginning with F:

pitchers apos mlb

Does anyone really want a pitcher’s flipping bats? And which pitcher? I guess a pitcher’s flipping bats are more desirable than pitchers flipping bats. That could be dangerous.

But wait! There’s more!

When she’s not confusing her right hand with her left (see today’s first post), the “news editor” for Yahoo! Style is confusing her readers. She’s also kinda insulting them with her disregard for niceties like punctuation, accurate spelling, and correct grammar.

Omitting a comma isn’t the worst offense in this paragraph, the ungrammatical were (which should be was) is. Or maybe it’s the inability to spell Ms. Wohlfahrt’s name correctly more than once:

tek sty 1

Each of those mistakes was made by a professional writer, who again thinks that each is a plural and that Ms. Wohlfahrt is someone named Wolfhart:

tek sty 2

But wait! There’s more! Once more the editor displays a woeful ignorance of grammar and the name of the subject she’s writing about:

tek sty 3

Where else can one person make so many mistakes in front of so many people and get paid for it?

This isn’t baseball

Well, at least the editors at Yahoo! Movies managed to get one possessive form right in this headline:

neesons mov

If this were baseball they’d be batting .500.

Punctuation friendly headline

Here’s a headline from Yahoo! Style that’s a tad hyphen happy:

environmentally-friendly sty

There’s no need for a hyphen between an adverb ending in -LY and the word it modifies. The -LY is the signal to the reader that the adverb modifies the word following it.

If it ends in S, add an apostrophe

It seems that the writer for Yahoo! Style thinks that a word ending in S requires an apostrophe, even if it’s a simple plural:

models apos sty

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,125 other followers

%d bloggers like this: