Trudging and plodding along

Was the Yahoo! Style trying to be clever with a mashup of trudging and plodding to come up with this non-word?

trodding-along-sty

Or did she (and her editor) really think that’s a word? Well, it’s not.

Based on my knowledge of English

Based on my knowledge of English, I’d say that this Yahoo! Style writer has trouble with common idioms (like based on) and likes to use redundant words (like off of):

based-off-of-sty-z

That’s quite a claim

Sometimes separating a number from the words that explain it, isn’t such a bright idea. Take this excerpt from Yahoo! Finance:

less-than-claimed-fin

You might think, as I did, that $29,000 was 67% less than claimed earnings of $90,000. Then you might think, as I did, that $29,000 was the real median. And then you’d reread the sentence to reassure yourself that the real median was $61,000, or 33% less than claimed. Or maybe $61,000—67% of the amount claimed. But not, 67% less than claimed.

I’m starting to get a headache. I think I’ll go take 4 or 5 Advil and go lie down.

She’s not a prima donna

No, she’s not a prima donna, according to Yahoo! Style. She’s a misspelled primadonna:

primadonna-sty

Not done with Lea Michele

Yesterday we learned that the folks at Yahoo! Style have trouble spelling Lea Michele’s name. You might think the misspelling was a mere typo, but you would be wrong. In the article about Ms. Michele, the writer gets her name wrong twice in the opening paragraph:

lea-1

Not content to abuse Ms. Michele’s name, the writer took a sledgehammer to the English language with has sang (does anyone think that’s correct?), followed by a misplaced apostrophe in what should be Kohl’s, followed by a bit of nonsense that I think should be get to see which workout kicked and the ridiculous ideal of a perfect night (which I think is supposed to be idea of a perfect night).

The rest of the article doesn’t get any better. It contains more misspellings, more misplaced and missing punctuation, and a whole lot of unintelligible word salad. I’ve seen better writing in a high school newspaper. Maybe I should stick to reading that.

Here’s a wise word of wisdom for ya’

Here’s a word of wisdom for the Yahoo! Style editor: Consult a dictionary about the meaning of the words you use. Perhaps then you’d learn that “wise words” are the only kind that come with wisdom:

wise-wisdom-sty-hp

You couldn’t have just said “wise words” or “words of wisdom” or just “wisdom”? Apparently not.

And here’s another bit of wisdom for ya’: Take some pride in your writing and try to spell the name of your subject correctly. She’s Lea Michele. Spelling her name wrong is worse than “wise words of wisdom.”

Were you comma-tose at the time?

Here’s a relatively unimportant fact: In the United States, a comma is placed before closing quotation marks; in the rest of the English-speaking world, it goes after.

commas-yr-end

Where do you think the person who wrote this for Yahoo! hails from? England? Canada? Australia?

Take a peek at this!

It piques my interest when I see a mistake like this one on Yahoo! Style:

sneak-peak-sty-3

Did the writer choose to use peak (instead of the correct peek) because of the spelling of sneak?

Your attendance at an English class is recommended

Attendance at an English class is recommended for this Yahoo! Style, who has a little problem with a little word:

attendance-to

Julia Louis-Dreyfus: Wrong again

Why do the writers and editors at Yahoo! have so much trouble with Julia Louis-Dreyfus’ name? Her last name is Louis-Dreyfus, not Dreyfus:

dreyfus

That’s bad. But it’s not the worst they’ve done to Ms. Louis-Dreyfus. There was the time they called her Julia Louie Dreyfus, which I thought was pretty funny. And the hyphen confusion that produced Julia-Louis Dreyfus. And the gender change that resulted in Julia Louise-Dreyfus. And the time she was both Julia-Louis Dreyfus and Julia Louis Dreyfuss in the same article.

I guess you just gotta admire the creativity, if not the accuracy, of Yahoo! staffers.

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