What color is the roof of your mouth?

Somehow, the writer for Yahoo Lifestyle managed to see the roofs of the mouths of a “stylish group.” I wonder what a brightly colored palate looks like:

I also wonder why the writer and her editor don’t know that palate refers to the roof of the mouth and palette refers to a selection of colors. (I also wonder why there’s a hyphen following brightly. It’s considered wrong to put a hyphen between an adverb ending in -LY and the word it modifies.)

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Are your policies benefiting readers?

Are Yahoo News’ policies benefiting its readers? I don’t know what the company’s policies are, but I know what they should adopt: Requiring that headlines be proofread by an actual human being before they’re published. In that way, the Internet giant might avoid embarrassments like this:

A spell-checker won’t have caught that typo. Nor would it have flagged this as a spelling mistake:

I’m not going to say that the Yahoo editors are pulling a total con job on readers. This is just one more reminder that you can’t rely on a spell-checker. But there’s one benefit — at least for me. I learned that puling is a real word; it means whimpering or whining.

 

Editor kicks off letter

A typo isn’t unusual on yahoo.com, and generally a typo doesn’t merit attention. But when it kicks off a letter in a word critical to the readers’ comprehension, a typo is serious mistake:

The lesson for all of us: Don’t rely solely on a spell-checker to do your proofreading.

If only there were a way…

If only there were a way to check the spelling of app names. Like, if the folks at Yahoo News had a picture of the app Grindr so that they could see how it’s spelled. Wouldn’t that be great!?

To to funny

If it’s really cold where you live, the weather might be called wintry. Except on yahoo.com, where it’s wintery:

In the U.S., the preferred pronunciation is with two syllables and the preferred spelling is wintry. Choosing an uncommon spelling of a word is not as bad as two to‘s, which I find too, too funny.

Quote unquote

Whose back did Lola Openg want scratched? That’s the question I’m left with when I read this on Yahoo Lifestyle:

The writer alleges that Ms. Openg said, “Scratch her back.” Whose back would that be? In fact Ms. Openg asked Alexa, “Scratch my back.” That’s a bit different, isn’t it? And that illustrates what happens when a writer and editor have no idea what a direct quote is.

Apostrophe-impaired?

Is there a shortage of apostrophes at Yahoo Lifestyle? Or is it just a shortage of editors who know how to use them? Here’s a headline and teaser that has me questioning if Yahoo hires only apostrophe- and spelling-impaired editors:

OK. So that was just a careless mistake (or two or three). The actual article must be better, right? Wrong. Those folks at Yahoo are still apostrophe-impaired, unable to put them in two places in one sentence:

Let’s take the charitable view that this is just a typo and not the result of a writer’s unfamiliarity with a common expression like “fill it up”:

I’d overlook this mistake (just like the writer overlooked the word to before walk), if it were the only goof, but alas, it’s not:

Another apostrophe goes missing here, but maybe it’s just the result of a malfunctioning keyboard:

But, wait! There’s more! After I wrote this post, the headline and teaser were corrected. Somewhat:

It looks like the editors noticed the missing apostrophe and the typo. Good job! Maybe next time they’ll learn to use a spell-checker and proofread before publishing. If not, I may just harass them some more.

Maybe it really is fake news

I’m not one to holler “fake news” when I see something obviously wrong online. I’m more likely to holler “Yahoo!” Yup, the internet giant makes mistakes on its pages — mistakes that are completely avoidable by a little bit of reading by its editors. Take this teaser on Yahoo News:

I can’t understand how that mistake was made. For the last month we’ve heard and read about the 17 deaths in Florida. And anyone who has been paying attention knows that 14 students and 3 staff members were victims of that tragedy. Why don’t the Yahoo editors know that?

Maybe they just don’t like to read. Maybe they prefer to exercise their imagination. Like they did on yahoo.com with this falsehood:

The pedestrian bridge that collapsed has not been open for a few days. Not even for one day. The bridge has not been opened at all. Period! (as Sean Spicer would say).

I had hope that the editors corrected the error when I noticed they updated the headline, but noooooo:

The editors still insist that the bridge opened days ago. With hope springing once more, I was sure they’d corrected the error when they updated the headline yet again:

And yet again, the alternative fact is still there. Maybe I have to reconsider my avoidance of calling obvious errors fake news.

I don’t think it’s right

It’s not unusual to see a completely erroneous apostrophe in the possessive pronoun its. What is unusual is a missing apostrophe in the contraction it’s. But it’s not so unusual on Yahoo Finance:

A historic mistake

It’s a historic mistake. No, I’m not talking about the trump regime. I’m referring to the use of the indefinite article an on Yahoo News:

Unless you’re Cockney and don’t pronounce the H in historic, the correct article is a. The article an is used before words that begin with a vowel sound, like an honest woman and an honorable man.

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