More thought, time and energy might help

The thought, time and energy that go into editing have not increased exponentially on Yahoo! Sports:

More thought, time and energy might have led to correcting the mismatched plural subject and singular verbs.

Who do you trust?

Would you consider Yahoo! News a trustworthy source of information if the editors either don’t proofread or can’t spot an obvious typo in a headline?

The word they were going for is affluenza, a blend of affluence and influenza, which joined the pop culture lexicon in 2013 when it was used in the defense of an obnoxious teen charged with four counts of intoxication manslaughter.

I hate to be a tattletale…

… but the editors at Yahoo! Sports broke up a perfectly good word:

A good time to stop

Yahoo! News makes a good case for stopping a search:

Incidents like these

Incidents of mismatched subjects and verbs are unfortunately common on Yahoo! Style:

This doesn’t pass the smell test

If only there were a way for the Yahoo! Style writer to verify the spelling of the captions she writes. Maybe if she had a picture of the eau de parfum she’s writing about, she wouldn’t make these misspellings:

Oh, wait! Here’s the actual picture that goes with that caption:

Maybe she didn’t think she needed to look at it. But when writing this caption:

. . . don’t you think she should have checked out the picture of the bottle of eau de parfum, which is quite different from cologne and eau de cologne:

Well, she finally got the product right in this caption:

. . .  but not the name of the manufacturer:

If these captions didn’t appear right next to the product pictures, perhaps no one would have noticed that the writer can’t copy words right under her nose. But they’re there and there’s no amount of eau de parfum that can cover the stink.

The ghost of Audrey Hepburn

Many people say Audrey Hepburn was an angelic actress of heavenly beauty. They may be correct — literally. According to Yahoo! Celebrity after her death, Audrey Hepburn worked for UNICEF:

Where do you keep your clothes?

While most people keep their clothes in a closet and maybe a dresser, this Yahoo! Style has wardrobe stables:

I think that means she hangs her dresses in a horse stall. Or it could just be proof that a dictionary should be a staple for every writer.

You might be ‘acting like an American editor,’ according to blogger

If you think a comma goes before a closing quotation mark, and never after, you might just be an American. ‘Cause that’s the way we punctuate here in the U. S. of A. If you think it goes after, then you might be thinking like the rest of the English-speaking world and like this Yahoo! Beauty editor:

In the U.S., two punctuation marks always go before a closing quotation mark: comma and period.

Neither is correct

The writer and editor at Yahoo! Style — neither of whom is a grammatical genius — thought this was correct:

In general neither, used as a pronoun, is grammatically singular and takes a singular verb like is, not are.  Some experts are OK with neither taking a plural verb when it is followed by of and a plural, like: Neither of us know much about grammar.

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