War on Buffett

Yahoo! is streaming the annual meeting of Berkshire Hathaway, so you’d think it could get the name of its CEO right. But nooooo. The folks at yahoo.com just can’t tell the difference between a serve-yourself meal and Warren Buffett:

fp buffet opt

The wrong effect

If you learned that affect is a verb and effect is a noun, you learned only part of the lesson about these two often-confused words. The writer for Yahoo! Sports probably learned that partial lesson, too, because she’s a little confused:

affect change mlb

To affect change means to have an effect on change. If you mean “bring about change,” use effect. As a verb effect means “bring about, make happen, or cause.” It’s often used in expressions like “effect a cure” or “effect change.”

Neither is correct

In this excerpt from Yahoo! Sports, neither or nor are is correct:

neither or are mlb

The correlative conjunction pair is neither…nor, not neither…or. And when neither…nor joins two nouns as the subject of a sentence, the verb (which should be is denying) must agree with the noun closer to it (which is Gordon).

This isn’t baseball

Well, at least the editors at Yahoo! Movies managed to get one possessive form right in this headline:

neesons mov

If this were baseball they’d be batting .500.

An adaptation of adaptation

It looks like someone at yahoo.com made an adaptation of adaptation, or just chose to use the less common adaption:

fp adaption

Some dictionaries don’t recognize adaption as a legitimate word. Others cite adaption as a variation of the preferred adaptation. Are they both correct? According to Grammarist:

 … the longer word, adaptation, is preferred by most publications and is much more common. Adaption is not completely absent, but it usually gives way to the longer form in edited writing. 

Aha! The word adaptation is the preferred option in edited writing. That explains why adaption appears on Yahoo!.

Editing and proofreading are the perfect combination

Editing and proofreading are the perfect combination to avoid the kind of grammatical error like this one from Yahoo! Style:

was sty

Chickens’ hit

Why was the Yahoo! Style writer confused about how to form the possessive of a plural noun like chickens?

chickenss prom sty

Maybe she couldn’t decide if the apostrophe went before or after the S. So, she put it before and after the S. That’s actually quite a clever solution. Totally wrong, though.

Striking the wrong chord

Nothing in this photo caption on Yahoo! Style hits the right note or strikes a chord with me:

hit cord sty

I’m embarrassed for the writer. She managed to screw up a common expression in two ways: The expression is “hit the right note” or “strike a chord” (but she can’t even use the correct homophone in the latter). It’s followed in the same sentence with a mismatched subject and verb. And to prove that she’s not just grammatically and verbally impaired, she shows that she knows little about the subject of this mess by misspelling Céline. I’ve read high school newspapers that are better written and edited than this.

How soon we forget

It hasn’t been a week since the passing of Prince, yet the editors at yahoo.com seem to have forgotten his name:

fp prnces

Lottie Moss: Model or photographer?

Lottie Moss isn’t just a model, she’s also a photographer. Who knew that someone who makes her living in front of a camera, also steps behind it?

behind camera sty

Who knew? Not this Yahoo! Style writer, who thinks that models are behind cameras, not in front of them.

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