Kim Kardashian and deadly fame

If you’re unfamiliar with French, as this Yahoo! Style writer appears to be, perhaps you should avoid certain words and phrases, like femme fatale:

fame-fatale-sty

Pardon my French

It looks as if this Yahoo! Style writer knows a little French and not much more English. If this were an actual English word, it would probably be pronounced cash-ay. If it were a real English word, it would be spelled cachet.

cache-acc-sty

What month would you select?

What month would you select in the Dylann Roof trial? According to yahoo.com, a July selection begins in the trial.

fp-july

But what is the selection for? Personally, I’d prefer to see a jury selection start now for Mr. Roof’s trial.

How to lose all credibility

If you’re a writer and your beat is fashion, shouldn’t you know how to spell the name of luxury brand Bottega Veneta? Not if you work for Yahoo! Style:

bottega-venetta-sty-hp

If you think that’s a typo, you would be wrong. In the article, after misspelling model Raquel Zimmermann’s name, she mangles Bottega Veneta:

bottega-venetta-sty

So, how much credibility does the writer — and Yahoo! Style —  have?

Speaking out

I must speak out about the writing by Yahoo! Answers staff: It sucks.

mylan-ans

Judging by the incorrect word usage, I’d guess that the writer is not a native English speaker. Why do I think that? The CEO of Mylan testified before Congress. Neither the CEO nor Mylan can be accused of “speaking out,” which means to talk freely and fearlessly. Quite the contrary. The expression “in the recent years” isn’t familiar to me, but “in recent years” is. And people aren’t affected about an issue, but affected by one.

This writer just isn’t familiar enough with English to be let loose on the public without the support of a competent editor.

Numbers make my head hurt!

Maybe this Yahoo! Finance writer shouldn’t be writing anything that involves numbers. She’s just no good at it. She claims that a company was acquired for $900 million:

bid-fin-2

That much seems pretty clear. Then she tells me that the acquired company actually had other offers — including one for $700 billion:

bid-fin-1

I’m no mathematical genius, but isn’t $700 billion more — a lot more — than $900 million, which the writer claims was the highest bid. I’m so confused. But not as confused as this writer.

Can you spot it?

Can you spot the misspelling from yahoo.com?

fp-dalmation

The white dog with the spots is a Dalmatian. The breed is named after Dalmatia, an area on the Adriatic Sea.

Are those letters to legislators?

While I’m pondering what “capitol letters” are (could they be missives to representatives on Capitol Hill?), you can ponder the mystery that is a mismatched subject and verb on Yahoo! Finance:

capitol-letters-fin

The word capitol means only one thing: A building or buildings where legislatures meet. If you mean something else (including uppercase letters), use capital. Maybe someone at Yahoo! can explain why using incorrect words does not matter to the Internet giant.

Women and her lifetime

Will Yahoo! Style writers make the same mistakes throughout their lifetime? Will they fail to understand that a plural noun (like women) requires a plural pronoun (like their)?

women-her-sty

No clue. No clue at all

I have no idea how this misspelling made it to the front page of Yahoo! Style:

paire-sty-hp

Is that some new, hip word that buzzing on social media? Is that the product of an American public school education? Anyone have a clue as to how that got by the editor, proofreader, and spell-checker?

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