Writing imbued with ignorance

I’m stumped. What do the Yahoo! News editors think imbue means?

Clearly they don’t know that it means to permeate or influence something.

The one thing everyone gets wrong about proofreading

Just about everyone makes a mistake when writing. Relying solely on a spell-checker for proofreading services is one of those mistakes. Spell-checkers can’t tell you if your perfectly spelled word is actually the wrong word. Just ask the folks at Yahoo! Finance:

To kick off this post

To kick off this blog post about Yahoo! Style, I’m excited to share that neither the writer nor the editor knows the difference between a noun (like kickoff) and a phrasal verb (like kick off):

Blogger is preparing to crack down

Someone at Yahoo! News should be preparing to crack down on editors who don’t know a noun (like crackdown) and a phrasal verb (like crack down):

Do you think a crackdown will actually happen?

Try romancing a dictionary

This Yahoo! Style writer won’t be making headlines for her knowledge of English:

Her rumored romance with a dictionary is hoax. Perhaps her editor can enlighten her on the correct preposition to use in this situation.

Racking my brain

I’m racking my brain trying to figure out how this Yahoo! Style writer could use raked up in this context:

The phrasal verb rake up means uncover. The expression the writer meant was raked in or racked up.

A full-blown editing crisis

At a legitimate publication, this would spawn a full-blown editing crisis. At Yahoo! Style, it’s just another misused word:

Apparently the editor didn’t know that crises isn’t singular; it’s the plural of crisis.

Bask in this!

I hopin’ one of my loyal readers can explain this sentence from Yahoo! Style:

Can you be “hugging onto” a person or simply hugging them? Or hanging onto them? What does that mean?

While you’re at it, maybe you can explain how one basks in firework beauty. Are you warmed by a single pyrotechnic device? Or are you enjoying fireworks, which is an actual display of the devices common on the Fourth of July.

Where do you keep your clothes?

While most people keep their clothes in a closet and maybe a dresser, this Yahoo! Style has wardrobe stables:

I think that means she hangs her dresses in a horse stall. Or it could just be proof that a dictionary should be a staple for every writer.

I suspect this is wrong

I’m not sure, but I think there’s an error in this headline from Yahoo! News:

Were there two London attacks, or were they suspected attacks? And what the heck was identified? I’m so confused. But so is the writer of this headline, I suspect.

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