It’s so unclear

After reading this on yahoo.com, I can’t figure out which players were fined:

fp its players

Were all WNBA players fined? It seems unlikely, but I’m hard-pressed to find any other singular noun that could be the antecedent for its. It’s more likely that the players on three teams were fined. If that’s the case, it’s clear that the writer should have referred to their players.

To whoever is reading this

To whoever is reading this: The Yahoo! Sports writer is confused about the use of whomever (which is the objective case of whoever and is used as the object of a preposition) and whoever (which can be the subject of a verb like was listening):

to whomever spo

This writer isn’t alone in his confusion. To many people, it appears that whomever is the object of the preposition to, but it’s the entire clause that’s the object of the preposition. And whoever should be the subject of the verb in that clause.

If you’re not into being grammatically nitpicky and you’re faced with the choice between who and whom or whoever and whomever, go with who or whoever. In more the half the cases, you’ll be correct, and even if you’re wrong, your writing will sound more authentic and less stilted and formal.

Her has made a mistake

Did this really sound right to the Yahoo! Beauty writer? Maybe it seemed right to the editor, too. So she and her editor have made a laughable grammatical mistake with this pronoun:

her 4 she sty

Thanks for clarifying that

Folks looking for clear information about the effects of Brexit on the US should steer clear of Yahoo! Finance, which offers this prediction:

has fin

Can you overlook the obvious disconnect between the plural subject (economy and market) and the singular verb (has)? I should have stopped reading at that point, because the next sentence is a mess of pronouns with no antecedents, except maybe in the mind of the writer. What does “it does have one… exposure” refer to? Does the pronoun it refer to the US economy or the US stock market or the UK economy? And what does its refer to? Some country?  I have no freakin’ idea. What I did learn from this? I won’t be reading the accompanying article.

How many can one sentence hold?

How many errors can be squeezed into a single sentence? If it’s on Yahoo! Style, at least four, each of which is completely avoidable:

each of which sty

If you’re writing about people, the preferred pronoun is who or whom, not which. There’s an apostrophe missing in what should be brand’s. And of course there are two misspelled names: Missy Elliott and Cara Delevingne.

Whoever wrote this needs an editor

Whoever is responsible for this grammatical gaffe on Yahoo! Celebrity needs an editor:

whomever cel sty

Maybe the writer thought whomever sounded cultured or erudite. But the word is the subject of the verb is and the subjective pronoun (who or whoever) is called for.

Is that even English?

I think this photo caption was originally written in Japanese and then translated by one of those apps written by someone with very limited knowledge of English:

all is sty

I don’t even know where to start with this one because I can’t understand any part of it. It has something to do with sunglasses, but not the “sports style” worn “a la” (does that mean à la?) Guy Fieri. But Mr. Fieri’s sunglasses aren’t possible, unlike other sunglasses. Is that what the writer meant? I won’t even go into the grammatical problems, of which there are many. I’ll just chalk this one up to ignorance of English and wonder why someone with such limited knowledge is allowed to write for a mega-company like Yahoo!.

The man of whom we speak

There’s at least one person who writes for a living, but has only a tenuous grasp of English grammar. Of course, the man of whom we speak is the Yahoo! Sports writer responsible for this:

of who mlb

Whoever did it should be embarrassed

There’s a dearth of competent editors over at Yahoo! Sports. Heck, there may be no editors at the website because any editor would know that the nominative case he is wrong following a preposition like between:

between he 1

Any editor would know that there’s a word missing in what should be a couple of years:

between he 2

And why can’t the writer and/or editor choose correct pronouns? The pronoun whomever is the objective case of whoever, which is the word the writer should have used since it’s the subject of the sentence.

Whoever wrote or edited this article should be embarrassed.

Between you and me, this is wrong

Here’s a common mistake on Yahoo! Sports — an incorrect pronoun:

between he mlb

The author probably thought that he was more erudite than the correct him. Between him and his editor, you’d think one of them would have spotted the error.

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