Is this the first time you’ve heard of Hillary Clinton?

Apparently the editors over at Yahoo! Style haven’t been paying attention. Somehow, Hillary Clinton just hasn’t been on their radar:


Is there anyone in the United States (or any country with a newspaper, radio station, TV reception, Internet access, or smoke signals) who hasn’t heard of Hillary?

How to lose all credibility

If you’re a writer and your beat is fashion, shouldn’t you know how to spell the name of luxury brand Bottega Veneta? Not if you work for Yahoo! Style:


If you think that’s a typo, you would be wrong. In the article, after misspelling model Raquel Zimmermann’s name, she mangles Bottega Veneta:


So, how much credibility does the writer — and Yahoo! Style —  have?

Maybe this wasn’t written in this country

While reading this photo caption on Yahoo! Style, I was struck by the writer’s use of the British whilst:


Perhaps Yahoo! outsourced the writing to an almost-English-speaking country. Maybe this was written for a UK site, and not for the American market. Maybe that’s why the writer capitalized queen; in some countries that are not the United States, that might actually be correct. And maybe that Lady Fag she writes of isn’t related to Ladyfag, the writer from New York City. The typo of that for than might be okie-dokie in the land where she lives. But in no English-speaking country is is what makes an acceptable substitute for the correct are what make.

All writing serves a purpose

All writing serves a purpose. And the purpose of this article from Yahoo! Style may be to illustrate what not to do. First lesson: If you’re including names in your article, spell them correctly. It’s not enough to just misspell them in the same way. If you’re writing about Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, Google her name.


Second, if you’re writing about editors-in-chief, don’t capitalize the title and don’t look like an idiot by forming the plural incorrectly. And make sure you’re confident enough in your English to include the article the in “in the second row” and “in the third row.”

Don’t follow the example of this gal. She’s nothing if not consistent. When she misspells a name like Stella Tennant, she sticks with it. None of this silly Googling a name to check the spelling:


Finally we encounter this gem, a sterling example of what not to do:


The takeaway: Read everything you write before you publish it. Read everything you write before you publish it.

If you can’t be right, at least be consistent

Well, you gotta give this Yahoo! Style writer props for being consistent. Not only did she misspell both the first and last names of actor Jussie Smollett, but she also did it twice:


It takes a special kind of confidence to pound out a name without bothering to Google it first.

Is the pressure too much?

Is there too much pressure on the writers at Yahoo! Style? Are they so stressed that they can’t do their jobs properly? Is that why 5 out of 7 recent photo captions contain misspelled names?

You might think this is just a typo, and not a deliberate misspelling of Pharrell:

pharell 1

You would be wrong. Unless the writer made the same typo twice:

pharell 2

You might not know how to spell Mica Arganaraz’s name, but a writer should:

pharell 4

Emily Ratajkowski is such a well-known model, that you’d think someone who writes about fashion would be familiar with her name. Again, you would be wrong:

pharell 3

Ale Dragulele sounds like an exotic alcoholic beverage, but it’s just a misspelling of Alex Dragulele:

pharell 5

It must be awful working in that environment. But can’t a writer take a little pride in their work and at least check the spelling of all names? (To check the spelling of all the names in this post, I highlighted the name, right-clicked, and selected “Search Google for …” It takes just a few seconds and saves me lots of embarrassment.)


Trump cut short

People must be getting nervous over at Yahoo! Finance, and it’s affecting their work. It looks like a little p ran out of Mr. Trump:

trum fin

And instead of merely appealing the EU tax decision, Apple will appeal against it, which might mean something to the writer, but to me means the writer is unfamiliar with English:

appeal against fin hp

I don’t know why Apple will appeal the decision. Heck if I owed a $14.50 tax bill, I’d just pay it:

14.5 news hp

Maybe it’s the principle of the thing. Or maybe the stress is getting to those folks at Yahoo!.

Two Trinas?

Are there really two women named Trina who share their weight-loss stories on Yahoo! Beauty?

cosland bea

Or did someone at Yahoo! forget to proofread?

Katie Couric would be horrified

Katie Couric was a legitimate journalist before she joined Yahoo. She’d be horrified if she saw this spelling of Philando Castile on

castille fp

Raquel Welch gains a little

Imagine going through the trouble of making a video for Yahoo! Style and committing a stupid misspelling like this:

racquel sty

The actress is Raquel Welch.

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