Not done with Lea Michele

Yesterday we learned that the folks at Yahoo! Style have trouble spelling Lea Michele’s name. You might think the misspelling was a mere typo, but you would be wrong. In the article about Ms. Michele, the writer gets her name wrong twice in the opening paragraph:

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Not content to abuse Ms. Michele’s name, the writer took a sledgehammer to the English language with has sang (does anyone think that’s correct?), followed by a misplaced apostrophe in what should be Kohl’s, followed by a bit of nonsense that I think should be get to see which workout kicked and the ridiculous ideal of a perfect night (which I think is supposed to be idea of a perfect night).

The rest of the article doesn’t get any better. It contains more misspellings, more misplaced and missing punctuation, and a whole lot of unintelligible word salad. I’ve seen better writing in a high school newspaper. Maybe I should stick to reading that.

Here’s a wise word of wisdom for ya’

Here’s a word of wisdom for the Yahoo! Style editor: Consult a dictionary about the meaning of the words you use. Perhaps then you’d learn that “wise words” are the only kind that come with wisdom:

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You couldn’t have just said “wise words” or “words of wisdom” or just “wisdom”? Apparently not.

And here’s another bit of wisdom for ya’: Take some pride in your writing and try to spell the name of your subject correctly. She’s Lea Michele. Spelling her name wrong is worse than “wise words of wisdom.”

Someone should get a long sentence for that Clause

It’s off to the grammar slammer for the Yahoo! Celebrity writer responsible for this clumsy Clause:

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Fashion not your passion?

If fashion isn’t your passion, maybe you shouldn’t be writing for Yahoo! Style. Or maybe it just doesn’t matter that you don’t know the real name of designer Nicolas Ghesquière:

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So, you don’t care to spell his name correctly. No biggy. You might want to focus on grammar and using the correct tense instead. Or not.

Lily-Rose Depp, 17 years old

You might have overlooked the missing hyphen in Lily-Rose Depp’s name in this excerpt from Yahoo! Style:

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You might have ignored the misspelling of Métiers d’Arts. But no one could miss 17 years old. It’s just wrong here. It’s OK in “Lily-Rose is 17 years old.” But when used as an adjective, it should be “17-year-old Lily Rose.”

Don’t add to Kanye’s stress

As if Kanye West wasn’t stressed enough, this headline on yahoo.com might just send him around the bend. Again.

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What do you call a vigilant theoretical physicist?

What do you call a vigilant theoretical physicist? Alert Einstein!

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Thanks to Yahoo! Style for the best typo of the day!

Not a good place for this

The home page of Yahoo! Celebrity is not a good place to misspell Joe Giudice’s name:

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Is this the first time you’ve heard of Hillary Clinton?

Apparently the editors over at Yahoo! Style haven’t been paying attention. Somehow, Hillary Clinton just hasn’t been on their radar:

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Is there anyone in the United States (or any country with a newspaper, radio station, TV reception, Internet access, or smoke signals) who hasn’t heard of Hillary?

How to lose all credibility

If you’re a writer and your beat is fashion, shouldn’t you know how to spell the name of luxury brand Bottega Veneta? Not if you work for Yahoo! Style:

bottega-venetta-sty-hp

If you think that’s a typo, you would be wrong. In the article, after misspelling model Raquel Zimmermann’s name, she mangles Bottega Veneta:

bottega-venetta-sty

So, how much credibility does the writer — and Yahoo! Style —  have?

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