Write, then edit

What’s better than writing? Writing, and then editing. And maybe doing a little research. That’s what the writer for Yahoo! Style should have done:

oscar nom then sty

He might have mentioned that Ms. Blanchett is an Oscar-winning actress (and not just a nominee). And he might have figured out that she looked “more like the fairy godmother” than the stepmother. Maybe.

Are you brighter than this writer?

Are you brighter than the Yahoo! Style writer who confused then with than?

brighter then style

They never cease to fail

When in comes to quality writing, the scribes at Yahoo! DIY never cease to fail:

never ceases to fail

Why would anyone make cotton candy that is guaranteed to be a failure at wowing guests? What better way to show your carelessness than adding an unnecessary word to a common idiom or confusing then with than?

When it comes to writing errors, these folks never cease to amaze.

More than enough

Reading this on Yahoo! Style should have been more than enough to give me pause: Did I really want to continue reading?

mens jewel 1

In spite of that, I continued, only to discover a missing word (there should be an a between wearing and cool). Then a problem with the next sentence: I think the writer fidgeted with it a tad too much:

mens jewel 2

It seems that every day I wish that I hadn’t read something on Yahoo!, like this word that means “commonplace or ordinary”:

mens jewel 3

But I soldiered on. I wish the writer had, too, and that he tried to uncover an unnecessary word. Maybe he tried, but he doesn’t can’t find it:

mens jewel 4

Writer of anarchy

If you’ve never seen than mistaken for then, or haven’t seen the compound adjective 30-second without its hyphen, then you haven’t been reading Yahoo! DIY.

soa 1

What would Yahoo! DIY be without its very own misuse of it’s for its?

soa 2

Somehow in that same article, this got past the eagle-eyed editors:

soa 3

I think it has something to do with wearing a pattern to keep your head warm. Frankly, I think a hat would be warmer than a pattern.

Of course there are more typos, like this one below:

soa 4

Call me old-fashioned, but I appreciate the well-placed hyphen and the beauty of a real dash (like this: —) and not a puny hyphen:

soa 5

Also, I think pronouns (like them) should refer to a noun that’s actually present in the same sentence. Or paragraph. Or article.

Here’s a roundup

Here’s a roundup of what you can find in a single sentence on Yahoo! Style: A misspelling of roundup, a noun (round up, two words, is a phrasal verb) and a mistake that shines brighter than diamonds:

round up then style

Wrecking havoc with the language

Yahoo! just launched a new site called Yahoo! Style. I immediately thought that it must be better written than the rest of Yahoo!; after all, it was new! Wouldn’t the Internet giant invest in the quality of the writing of a new site? Wouldn’t Yahoo! finally hire competent editors to ensure the success of Style? I was hopeful as I jumped at the opportunity to read an article by Style’s editor in chef. Now there’s a person who must appreciate the need for quality writing.

The title promised info on dressing for extreme temperatures, so I’m thinking the heat of summer and the cold of the dead of winter:

how to dress style

By the time I’d finished the article, I’d learned about dressing for heat and for that other temperature extreme — rain. But I shouldn’t have been surprised that the writer (the editor in chief!) couldn’t figure out what he was supposed to be writing about. The more I read the more I realized he probably couldn’t figure out what language he was supposed to be writing in.

Here he takes a serious subject like global warming and reveals its true threat to humanity: It wrecks havoc on fashion:

wrecked havoc style

Well, wrecking havoc sounds good to me; that would be destroying chaos. It’d be much worse if it were wreaking (or bringing about) havoc.

Then, I read this use of then instead of than:

then seersucker style

I’m going to try to ignore the advice, which doesn’t exactly seem like it’s meant for the woman of the twenty-first century, and focus on the writing, which kinda sucks:

wearing is wearing style

When I read this, I thought wearing cotton over silk sounded odd for dressing for hot weather:

allows to breath style

But the writer (the editor in chief!) meant “prefer cotton over silk.” The rest of the stream-of-consciousness writing alleges that cottons allows [sic] the body to breath. Believe me, if your body ain’t breathing, wearing cotton isn’t going to help. The writer meant that cotton is preferable because cotton breaths (that is, it allows air to pass through it).

So, am I hopeful that Yahoo! Style will provide quality content? Not if it’s written by Yahoo! writers (and the editor in chief).

Then better than than

Want grammatically correct writing? Then Yahoo! Shine is not for you:

than shine animals

And then I wrote ‘then’

Question: What’s better than this description on Yahoo! Shine?

then shine

Answer: This would be better than it is if the writer had used than instead of then. Then, it would have been correct.

Writer was more worried about appearance than grammar

Yahoo! has changed the appearance of its front page, but its content hasn’t gotten any better. It’s still loaded with grammatical errors, typos, misspellings, and wrong words:

fp then being

It seems that the writer was more worried about appearances than choosing the correct word.

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