Downright embarrassing

As anyone who’s ever been duped by something they’ve read on Yahoo! Shine can attest, the site has some problems. There are problems with the accuracy of some articles. Like the claim that Shine had pictures of Prince George in Australia — days before he arrived there. And, of course, there are problems with grammar and spelling and word choice.

Not all mistakes are horrid, like this sentence with an extra word and the breakup of a perfectly fine word into two words:

praying 1

But some goofs are downright embarrassing:

praying 2

I’m assuming that the writer meant preying (which means victimizing). But co-counsil? Is that the bastard child of a council mating with a counsel?

How many people were infected?

Geez, I can’t imagine how many people suffered from this staff infection, but it must have been a lot because it’s mentioned on Yahoo! Sports:

staff sports

The only thing worse would be a staff with a staph infection.

Not the first time

Unfortunately, this isn’t the first time a Yahoo! scribe has confused premier and premiere. This time it’s on Yahoo! Finance:

premiers finance

Premier is a noun or adjective; the verb is premiere.

Is it too much to ask that you rein those errors in?

If I could tell the writer for Yahoo! TV, I’d tell him to rein in his errors. I’d probably have to explain that a monarch reigns; the things you use to control a horse are reins:

hom reign tv

I’d take this writer aside and tell him that even one error is too much. This is not too much; in fact, it’s one letter short of too much:

hom to much tv

That adds up — not!

What was the writer for yahoo.com really thinking when writing this?

fp ads

Did the writer have advertisements, a major source of revenue for the Internet giant, on the brain?

Slacker’s guide to proofreading

If you’re still thinking you can get away without proofreading everything you’ve written (OK, so maybe you don’t need to proof your shopping list), that’s just what the writer for Yahoo! Shine thought. She was wrong:

your still wearing shine hp

It’s hard to do worse than this

When it comes to its treatment of the English language, it’s hard to do worse than Yahoo! Shine. In just seven words the writer manages to omit two words and misspell one:

when it comes its shine

It’s never to late

It’s never “to late.” The correct expression is “too late.” That’s just one of several homophones a Yahoo! Shine writer gets wrong in a single article:

to late 1

She’s racked up another homophonic horror here:

to late 2

As a verb wrack means “to wreck”; when you mean “to accumulate” use rack up.

She’s made more than her fair share of errors. Here’s another one:

to late 3

I wish I could call it a compliment

Yahoo! News is the armpit of online media. That’s not a compliment. It’s just a reaction I had to this made-up word that appears in a very large headline on the site:

nj 1

Residents of New Jersey are New Jerseyans or New Jerseyites.

So, OK, the writer made up a word. Is that worse than making up rules for the use of the comma, and randomly sprinkling that punctuation in a sentence?

nj 2

Probably not. It’s not worse than this:

nj 3

If you’re trying to be sarcastic, you have to be scrupulous in your use of language; otherwise, readers will think your sarcasm is just one more careless or ignorant mistake. This attempt at sarcasm fails because the writer doesn’t know the difference between it’s (for “it is” or “it has”) and the possessive its. If the writer had mentioned that the state is famous for its even-keeled, milquetoast residents, then it might have been seen as an attempt at humor.

It’s hard not to cringe

It’s hard not to cringe when you read something as poorly written as this article on Yahoo! Shine. From the typos and the writer’s imaginative spelling of Rutgers, it has a lot to offer the discerning reader:

email 1

She writes about an author whose most recent book is “The Essentials of Business Etiquette: How to Greet, Eat, and Tweet…” using who’s (which means “who is” or “who has”) and getting the title wrong:

email 2

I’d tell the writer to learn to proofread, or if you don’t have time, get someone to do it for you. It would be helpful to you for your career:

email 3

It’s time she learn the difference between a possessive pronoun (like its) and a contraction (like it’s):

email 4

If she learned to proofread, she could send an email and post something on a social media site without typos and missing words:

email 5

She might also learn to check her articles after they’ve been published to ensure she hasn’t omitted vital information, like the text of a tweet:

email 6

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