Who was the bomber

Is this as confusing to you as it is to me? This headline on the Yahoo! front page has me wondering: Was the mosque bomber a Shiite or did the bomber attack a Shiite mosque?

fp id-ed

A hyphen would have made it clear that it was a Shiite-mosque bomber. And where did the missing hyphen go? It went into ID-ed, which should be ID’ed (according to the American Heritage Dictionary).

Are we agree’d?

You don’t write free’d or flee’d or agree’d, do you? So, why on God’s green Earth did the Yahoo! Makers writer think she needed an apostrophe in the past tense of pee?

mom peed diy

And while I’m questioning her knowledge of English, I’ll pose one more query: Why didn’t she capitalize mom?

And then I fell asleep

It must be so exhausting to write for Yahoo! Makers that the writer fell asleep before completing this photo caption:

plate setting diy

Clearly the writer wasn’t tired from searching the dictionary for the correct words to use. If she had tried looking up plate setting she would have found it doesn’t exist in the American Heritage Dictionary. The combination of plate and utensils for one person is called a place setting. Let’s hope that next time she’s a little less drained and she takes care to match a verb to a singular subject (like jar).

A Hall of Fame error

Do the Dallas Cowboys have a plan for Randy Gregory? Or does the team have plans? You just can’t tell because of this mismatch of subject and verb on Yahoo! Sports:

plan include spo

That’s not exactly an error for the Hall of Fame of Grammar Goofs, but hyphenating Hall of Fame is.

Putting in place

The editor of the Yahoo! front page has been putting in place some interesting typos and omissions:

fp has putting

So, did the writer mean has been putting? Or has put? Or is putting? Or was putting? Or something else?

How many is a number?

The number of errors on yahoo.com reaches a level that hasn’t been seen since yesterday at noon. Here’s one more:

fp number reach

A number of these errors are avoidable by simply employing an editor with a thorough understanding of grammar.

The American Heritage Dictionary describes how to choose the correct verb to use with the noun number:

As a collective noun number may take either a singular or a plural verb. It takes a singular verb when it is preceded by the definite article the: The number of skilled workers is increasing. It takes a plural verb when preceded by the indefinite article a: A number of the workers have learned new skills.

Dumbest Statement of the Day

If you read this on the Yahoo! front page, you might be wondering how Blake Lively could wear 256 outfits in one week:

fp outfits

That would require a lot of changes of clothes; in fact, she’d have to average 36 outfits a day. She’d have to change outfits not just between engagements, but during engagements and in the limo driving to  engagements.

So, why did the writer publish such a dumb statement? Because Ms. Lively asked designers for 256 outfits prior to her press tour. During the weeklong tour, she wore a total of 18 outfits. That’s just a tad different from what you read here.

Oh, and the use of was? If making grammatical errors were a sport, this writer would be considered an Olympian. A statement contrary to fact requires a verb in the subjunctive mood; in this case that’s were, not was.

More games amount to more than one

Was the writer for the Yahoo! front page unable to figure out that games is plural? More grammar errors and having to face disgruntled readers amount to one amateurish webpage requiring a little editorial support:

fp amounts

Writers who forget grammar

What do you think of writers who forget grammar and can’t match a verb to its subject? I’m thinkin’ of the person behind this grammatical goof on yahoo.com:

fp preys

Is that just a careless typo, a slip of a digit? Or is that an indication of a deeper, more serious attention deficit disorder when it comes to grammar?

Not that kind of writer

Some writers never make grammatical mistakes. They know every tense of every irregular verb; they can identify the subject of a sentence in a sea of prepositional phrases; they never use a plural pronoun with a singular antecedent. Some writers never make grammatical mistakes. This writer is not one of them:

shes began sty

She’s begun making her first string of mistakes in this article for Yahoo! Style with a grammatical gaffe that’s so easy to spot it’s a wonder it slipped by the editor. Oh, yeah, I almost forgot: Yahoo! doesn’t employ editors who are actually concerned with grammar.

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