Not a single reader supports this

Not a single writer or editor (except those working for Yahoo! Finance) supports the use of a plural verb (like support) with a singular noun (like, oh, say, maybe member):

Blogger addresses grammar

Let’s address the grammatical gaffe on yahoo.com:

What the heck were the editors thinking!?

New record errors in one sentence

This might just be a new record for number of errors in a single sentence:

It’s unimaginable to me (and to most English speakers) how the writer could think that sentence is okie-dokie for publication. She didn’t notice that prices starts is a grammatical horror? Or that prices can start at $700 and also go up to $1500. But there’s only one starting price for any item.  And prices … is sold? That one made me spit out my sugar-free, nonfat vanilla latte. That’s so bad, I almost didn’t notice the random and totally unnecessary at.

Reactions to headline

Reactions to a headline on Yahoo! Style shine:

Actually, I don’t know what that means; I have no idea how reactions shine (or shines, as Yahoo! editors would have it).

Removing your mistakes has never been exciting

Yahoo! Style staff seems to include a writer who is still learning English. That’s OK. There’s nothing wrong with hiring ESL students, especially if they’re working for a trade school, where on-the-job training is part of the experience. If they’re employed by a for-profit company, then they need a competent editor to avoid publishing an embarrassing statement like this:

Try to ignore the obvious grammatical gaffe and focus on the allegation that removing layers [of clothing] has never been exciting. You won’t get an argument from me.

They was there?

Anyone have any idea how this grammatical gaffe slipped by the eagle-eyed editors at Yahoo! Style?

was

Her subject and verb aren’t perfect

Whenever I see a grammatical goof this blatant, I wonder what the heck the writer was thinking:

silhouettes-and-palette-is

Then I remember I’m reading Yahoo! Style and there probably was no thinking involved.

The subjects and verb was wrong

Let’s take the charitable view and call this grammatical gaffe on Yahoo! Style a typo:

walls-runway-was

The writer meant to type were but her fingers slipped and she typed was. Yeah, that’s the ticket.

Does it involve a time machine?

If the current Mrs. Trump is like the first ladies to come before her, does that mean that in the future there will be first ladies who were first ladies in the past before the current first lady of the present?

to-come-before-sty

I’m so confused. Why didn’t the Yahoo! Style writer just say, “Like the first ladies who came before her”? Or just, “Like the first ladies before her”? Or, “Like other first ladies” since all other first ladies came before the current Mrs. Trump? Unless she means the future first ladies from the past. That would involve a DeLorean and Doc Brown.

How much more does it take?

If crop tops, chokers, neon everything and more trends aren’t enough to merit a plural verb, what more does it take? You’d have to ask the Yahoo! Style writer who can’t seem to match a verb to its (very plural) subject:

wasnt-enough-sty

%d bloggers like this: