It’s too funny

It’s hard to believe that a professional writer (even one who works for Yahoo! Makers) can make this mistake:

dollar 1

Using the contraction it’s (which means it is or it has), instead of the correct possessive pronoun its is one of the most common mistakes anywhere, but especially at Yahoo!.

In the same article the writer makes another homophonic error. This is too funny:

dollar 2

It’s missing something

It’s a missing apostrophe on the yahoo.com in what should be a contraction of it is:

fp its no apos

It could’ve easily been correct

With a little help from a competent editor, this could’ve easily been correct. But it’s on Yahoo! Style, a site that’s in its own grammatically incorrect world:

could've easy sty

Go take a nap

I was thinking of taking the gloves off when writing about the mistakes in a recent article on Yahoo! Style. But then I took pity on the writer, who is probably just tired and overworked and still learning English. That’s the only explanation I could come up with when I read the very first paragraph:

accessory who

Who doesn’t know that who is used exclusively for human beings? Oh, this writer. The correct word is which. And who doesn’t know that it’s is short for it is or it has. This tired, overworked writer.

But the blunder that had me feeling really, really sorry for the writer was this:

accessory who husband

That’s gotta be the result of a muddled head, unable to think clearly due to stress, long hours, and short deadlines. Yeah, that’s the reason.

Take a peek at this

Take a peek at this capitalization (or rather, lack of capitalization) of Christmas on Yahoo! DIY:

blogs 1

Who doesn’t know to capitalize the holiday? The same person who doesn’t know that using that to refer to human beings is considered impolite. The pronoun who would be more to Emily Post’s liking.

blogs 2

Just one peek into this paragraph reminds us that the writer isn’t fond of capitalizing holidays like Valentine’s Day:

blogs 3

Or Mother Nature:

blogs 4

Reading that, you feel like you are really peeking into the mind of the writer, who has trouble picking the right homophone and who forgets to use an apostrophe to show that it’s kids’ art.

Writer of anarchy

If you’ve never seen than mistaken for then, or haven’t seen the compound adjective 30-second without its hyphen, then you haven’t been reading Yahoo! DIY.

soa 1

What would Yahoo! DIY be without its very own misuse of it’s for its?

soa 2

Somehow in that same article, this got past the eagle-eyed editors:

soa 3

I think it has something to do with wearing a pattern to keep your head warm. Frankly, I think a hat would be warmer than a pattern.

Of course there are more typos, like this one below:

soa 4

Call me old-fashioned, but I appreciate the well-placed hyphen and the beauty of a real dash (like this: —) and not a puny hyphen:

soa 5

Also, I think pronouns (like them) should refer to a noun that’s actually present in the same sentence. Or paragraph. Or article.

Reverse that

It’s not unusual for a writer to use the possessive pronoun its when the contraction it’s is called for. So, I wasn’t surprised to see this goof on Yahoo! DIY:

its list diy

What did surprise me was that the writer uses it’s instead of the correct its:

its list diy 2

She’s really, really confused. But she can clear up this problem by writing it’s every time she thinks its is correct — and vice versa.

That’s not impossible

Do you ever think that you’ve seen every writing error that could possibly be made when traipsing around the Internet? Just when I think there are no new mistakes to be made, I read something on Yahoo! DIY that disabuses me of that notion. I’ll see randomly capitalized words (like fall and holiday), common idioms screwed up by the use of the wrong preposition (the expression is set foot in), and of course the ever-popular it’s for what should be its:

fall time diy

This is not impossible, but it should be:

fall time diy 2

Opposed to pasta? You may be antipasta. You also may be anti-spell-checker and anti-punctuation:

fall time diy 3

(That’s the first time I’ve encountered a misspelled antipasto. Who doesn’t love a good misspelling?)

And I’m totally looking forward to a new dish involving the mysterious slided tomato; there’s apparently a reipe for the tomoato concoction:

fall time diy 4

Have we seen every error that could possibly be made in the English language? Hardly.

What are the odds?

What are the odds that a professional writer would use its and mean it’s and use it’s and mean its? If that writer works for Yahoo! DIY, pretty good:

its w wo apos diy

Why not thinking out of the box

It looks like the elementary school crowd has taken over the writing of this article on Yahoo! DIY. How else would you explain the verb gets with an apostrophe? Or the use of it’s instead of its? Did we all master that by the time we were 12? And I’m still trying to figure out how an editor would fix the last sentence here:

gets its apos diy

Is it “Warm gatherings … call for” or “A warm gathering… calls for”? Anyone?

Sometimes when you’re trying to write something creative, you have to think out of the box. But not this far out of the box:

gets its apos diy 2

There’s that apostrophe again, used to form a plural this time. And for the third time in a single article, it’s wrong. Never has a little punctuation mark done so much and been so wrong.

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