Let’s run through that again

Let’s run through this one more time for the folks at Yahoo! Style: If you’re unsure of the spelling of a word, consult a dictionary. If a word looks funny (like, oh, say, maybe throughs), consult a dictionary:

run-throughs-sty

If the writer had done that, she might have seen that run-throughs is a noun requiring a hyphen. Just in case incidents like this happen to arise, editors can cut them out and replace them with the correct word. Editors can also be sure pronouns (like them, not it) match their antecedents (which in this case is incidents).

Readers’ confusion

The writer of this article on Yahoo! Style is obviously confused. Very confused:

voterss-sty

Maybe she didn’t know if there was one voter’s ensembles or many voters’ ensembles, so she mashed them together and created voters’s ensembles. And readers’ confusion.

 

It’s a democratic process, but the Democratic party

Hillary Clinton is the Democratic nominee for the presidency, but you wouldn’t know it if you read this on Yahoo! Style:

democratic-clintonss-sty

As a common noun, democratic refers to a democracy or people in general. But if you’re referring to the political party in the U.S., it’s Democratic, with a big D.

Speaking of a big D, that’s the grade I’d give this writer for coming up with Clintons’s.  I’d be appalled if I hadn’t seen that error so often on Yahoo!. It seems Yahoo! writers (and their editors, if they have them) don’t know that the plural of Clinton is Clintons and the possessive of  Clintons is Clintons‘.

Friends’ and families’ faces fall

If well-educated editors overlooked this error on Yahoo! Style, their friends’ and families’ faces would fall to the floor:

friends-and-familys-sty

I’m assuming that the friends and families (there’s probably more than one family involved) have separated faces, so there needs to be an apostrophe after the S on both friends’ and families’.

When in doubt

When in doubt about forming the possessive of a word, just follow the example of this Yahoo! Style writer:

friendss-sty

Does the apostrophe go before the S? After the S? Unsure? Put it before and after! Turn your dilemma into dilemma-ade!

Back to school for you!

The editor for Yahoo! Style should head back to elementary school to learn the importance of the apostrophe:

girls boys no apo sty hp

Without the correct punctuation (and that would be two apostrophes), that headline leaves me scratching my head and dusting the dandruff off my keyboard. Were one girl’s outfits responsible for one boy’s bad grades? Or were many girls’ outfits responsible for many boys’ grades? Or was it one girl’s outfits and many boys’ grades? Or many girls’ outfits and one boy’s grades? Oy, now I’ve got a headache. I think I have to go lay down.

Readers’ favorite writer

If you’re one of those readers who cringes when you encounter a typo or — horrors!— a grammatical error, you’ll want to skip this article on Yahoo! Style. The writer seems to have a problem with a common rule we all learned in third grade:

starss style

Perhaps the writer didn’t know if she was writing about one star (and therefore should use star’s) or more than one (requiring stars’). So, she combined the possessives into misguided mashup.

Was it writers’s block?

Did the Yahoo! Style writer suffer a brain aneurysm or just writer’s block when it came to writing this?

sportss sty

She was probably wondering if she should have used the singular sport’s or the plural sports’ and couldn’t make up her mind, so she did a little melding. Or maybe she just has no idea how to form the possessive of a noun. ‘Cuz she made the same mistake in a photo caption:

winnerss sty

The Kardashians aren’t possessive

The Kardashians might have a lot of possessions, but they’re not possessive. The plural is Kardashians, without an apostrophe. Please ignore what you read on Yahoo! Beauty:

kar

How many can one sentence hold?

How many errors can be squeezed into a single sentence? If it’s on Yahoo! Style, at least four, each of which is completely avoidable:

each of which sty

If you’re writing about people, the preferred pronoun is who or whom, not which. There’s an apostrophe missing in what should be brand’s. And of course there are two misspelled names: Missy Elliott and Cara Delevingne.

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