A writer’s face

The writer’s face should be red from embarrassment for this mysterious use of a plural (instead of the possessive celebrity’s) on Yahoo! Makers:

celebrities face diy

No Pulitzer Prize for this writer

If there were a prize for really embarrassing writing mistakes, this writer from Yahoo! Style would be in contention. There are few errors more embarrassing than misspelling the topic of your article. Like Lilly Pulitzer:

pullitzer 1

It’s possible to overlook the missing apostrophe in what should be the possessive brand’s. But no one with a basic knowledge of grammar can overlook this mismatch of subject and verb:

pullitzer 2

This writer’s style lacks a certain cachet — literally. She chose cache (which is pronounced cash and refers to concealed valuables or a type of computer storage) instead of the correct cachet.

Finally, convinced she knows how to spell Pulitzer and proving herself wrong again, she provides more evidence that she’s not going to be winning any prizes anytime soon:

pullitzer 3

Take a peek at this

Take a peek at this capitalization (or rather, lack of capitalization) of Christmas on Yahoo! DIY:

blogs 1

Who doesn’t know to capitalize the holiday? The same person who doesn’t know that using that to refer to human beings is considered impolite. The pronoun who would be more to Emily Post’s liking.

blogs 2

Just one peek into this paragraph reminds us that the writer isn’t fond of capitalizing holidays like Valentine’s Day:

blogs 3

Or Mother Nature:

blogs 4

Reading that, you feel like you are really peeking into the mind of the writer, who has trouble picking the right homophone and who forgets to use an apostrophe to show that it’s kids’ art.

You write the top, I’ll write the bottom

In today’s installment of “You Write the Top, I’ll Write the Bottom,” we witness the results of two people who write for yahoo.com and can’t figure out if it’s a children magazine or a children’s magazine:

fp children mag

You’re under arrest

The grammar police should make an arrest at the yahoo.com headquarters for this gaffe:

fp him being arrested

Did that really sound right to the writer? If so, then he or she needs to hang around people who speak proper English and start reading something other than Facebook timelines and Twitter posts.

The correct pronoun is the possessive his because being is a gerund, which is a verb functioning as a noun. The writer could have avoided this embarrassment by simply writing “by his arrest.” Easy, no?

You write the top, I’ll screw up the bottom

In this episode of “You Write the Top, I’ll Write the Bottom,” we see the results of two writers for the Yahoo! front page who can’t agree on the spelling of a rather important word to a headline:

fp eyeshadow

According to the American Heritage Dictionary, eye shadow is correct (although some dictionaries also allow eyeshadow). But that’s not all! There’s an apostrophe missing in pros: Depending on the number of pros involved, it should be either pro’s tips or pros’ tips.

One day’s worth of errors

This is just one error that showed up on Tuesday on Yahoo! Style:

7 days worth style

One day’s worth of writing errors would reveal a variety of goofs; seven days’ worth would be overwhelming.

One shopper, many bodies?

Can one person have more than one body? And can a department store survive with only one shopper? These are the questions that have plagued me since reading this on Yahoo! Style:

shoppers style

Back to school for you!

Could the writer of this module on the Yahoo! front page be a college graduate? I’m not sure. I’d expect a college graduate to know that an apostrophe is required in “Parents college debt nightmare”:

fp college debt

I’d expect that a college graduate could read an article and summarize it accurately. And that’s when I realized that perhaps this writer is still in high school, struggling with understanding text written for a tenth grader. That’s how I’d explain the allegation that these parents owe a huge sum “nearly a decade after the graduation.” Since the parents have more than one daughter, I wanted to know whose graduation was a decade ago. So I read the article and learned that these folks borrowed the money a decade ago — not that their daughters graduated a decade ago.

To the writer, I’d say, stay in school and get that high school diploma. To readers of yahoo.com, I say don’t believe what you read.

It takes one millisecond’s time

It takes just one millisecond’s time to spot the missing apostrophe on Yahoo! News:

six years time new

An apostrophe is required in what the Associated Press Stylebook calls a quasi possessive: 6 years’ time, one week’s pay, ten years’ experience.

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